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-   -   Masonry Siding: Can it extend up to the 2nd floor? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f105/masonry-siding-can-extend-up-2nd-floor-138138/)

AlexHouse 03-24-2012 10:35 PM

Masonry Siding: Can it extend up to the 2nd floor?
 
Is it possible to achieve this design? The issue that I'm questioning is how to attach the roof above the first floor windows and still have the 2nd floor masonry siding being supported on the foundation's brick ledge.

To my simple way of looking at this, either the roof is attached to the framing, thus breaking the column of masonry which rests on the brick ledge, or the masonry continues up to the second floor without interruption, thus all of it is supported on the brick ledge but now the roof has to be attached to the wall in some way that escapes me.

Can anyone shed some light on whether this is possible and what techniques are required?

http://img600.imageshack.us/img600/589/wallsi.jpg

joecaption 03-24-2012 10:47 PM

Looks like dry stacked Faux stone to me.
Do a key word search on it.

AlexHouse 03-24-2012 11:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 884806)
Looks like dry stacked Faux stone to me.
Do a key word search on it.


Please excuse the rendering. It may look like faux stone but the design criteria calls for real stone built over a brick ledge on the foundation.

I suppose the easy solution is to have real stone on the first floor, built on the brick ledge and then transition to some type of concrete fake stone which is mortered right onto the wall surface and doesn't need a brick ledge. I'd rather not do this if there is a way of using real stone.

cleveman 03-24-2012 11:47 PM

I think you either do the masonry first, then build the roofs, attaching the ledger to the masonry, or you frame the roof first and run the masonry around the rafters.

If you run the masonry around the rafters, the ledger would be set-in so it doesn't interfere with the masonry coming up, then one would work up through the rafters (around).

It depends on the construction of the structure. Are the walls framed with lumber, or are they masonry, ICF, whatever getting a stone veneer later?

Can you dig that?

AlexHouse 03-25-2012 12:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cleveman (Post 884826)
If you run the masonry around the rafters, the ledger would be set-in so it doesn't interfere with the masonry coming up, then one would work up through the rafters (around).

Good! That makes sense to me. The walls are 2x6 lumber framed, so the inset ledger seems to be the way to go, now it's just a matter of firmly securing the ledger between the studs instead of onto the surface of the studs.

jomama45 03-25-2012 09:31 AM

The most common way to deal with that in my own past experiences is to stop the stone at the soffit, work 4" concrete block between the "truss bays" to the top of roof flashing and then start with stone again above the counter-flashing line. The reason for the block going so high is to allow a nice flat substrate to flash into, an a "reglet" is easier to cut into a level horizontal joint.

If you wanted to build it out differently there are other options, like only bringing the block or stone up every 4' or so and spanning the balance with a steel lintel/angle iron.

AlexHouse 03-27-2012 02:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jomama45 (Post 884959)
The most common way to deal with that in my own past experiences is to stop the stone at the soffit, work 4" concrete block between the "truss bays" to the top of roof flashing and then start with stone again above the counter-flashing line. The reason for the block going so high is to allow a nice flat substrate to flash into, an a "reglet" is easier to cut into a level horizontal joint.

If you wanted to build it out differently there are other options, like only bringing the block or stone up every 4' or so and spanning the balance with a steel lintel/angle iron.


Thank you for the detailed explanation. I have a better understanding of what is involved now and this will help me in the design phase. I really want to avoid discovering problems too late after the fact.


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