Ledgestone Indoor High Walls - Concrete, Stone & Masonry - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Concrete, Stone & Masonry


CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-17-2015, 11:43 AM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 6
Rewards Points: 12
Default

Ledgestone Indoor High Walls


Hi There! Hopefully Someone can answer what prep-work needs to be done to the my high wall to hang real rock glued pattern ledge-stone. I've searched the internet to no avail. I have an almost 18' high wall. The stone will be covering the fireplace and that same size rock strip will go all the way up the wall. The wall is a perimeter wall and has standard drywall. I assume I will have to replace the drywall that is there with something stronger? Plywood? Thanks in advance for advice!

Advertisement

dyluck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2015, 11:54 AM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 1,304
Rewards Points: 2,600
Default


whats the plywood for? wall stability? if you use wood then why not go right over the drywall since drywall is a fire barrier ?

what about using construction adhesive and 1/2" cement board?

the shear strength of the drywall, or any board, is fairly high if the screw pattern is sufficient and done right.

Advertisement

concrete_joe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2015, 02:47 PM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 6
Rewards Points: 12
Default


thanks concrete joe. I think this is the question, what do I use? What would you do in my case? Lay the stone over existing drywall with adhesive or cement? Or rip down the drywall and replace it with cement board? I just dont' know what normal code is and wouldn't want rock falling down on our head if the drywall can old the weight. The drywall is probably 1/4" and I am uncertain of the screw pattern, however I could always throw more screws in it!
dyluck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2015, 03:29 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 1,304
Rewards Points: 2,600
Default


so, drywall is rather soft. i would remove the drywall and then screw on some 1/2" ply, then glue & screw 1/4" cement board over the ply (be sure to put correct side out for the stone). you then mortar per stone instructions. i am not sure how to finish the edges of the verticals if what you put on is thicker than existing drywall, does the stone have any reveal end pieces you can use?

if its 24" framing then i might opt for some 5/8" ply to keep bending between bays to a minimum. screw to studs only for best results.

use of a flexible "mortar" or "thinset" (one that can be used with the stone) would be best choice so that when things move a little the mortar doesnt crack and stone fall off, etc.

this 18ft wall, what does it sit on? slab? edge wall? is there enough support there? a sag in that bottom side can cause stone to break off, etc.
concrete_joe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2015, 05:25 AM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: atl & hilton head
Posts: 4,341
Rewards Points: 4,264
Default


why not just put up expanded wire mesh & use mortar like the pro's ? right screw/washer combo's strong enough to hold mesh both for pullout & shear,,, properly attached, mesh's also strong enough to hold liteweight stone,,, what's 'real rock' ? size ? weight ? its always challenging tryin' to 'work blind',,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
stadry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2015, 10:30 AM   #6
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 6
Rewards Points: 12
Default


Thanks for your replies. I will take a picture of the work area, the stone and the manufacturer and post them here.

I don't believe they have end stones to cap off unless I do some fancy rock cutting. I will reply again soon with the pictures and stone type etc.
dyluck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2015, 12:12 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 1,304
Rewards Points: 2,600
Default


i would not mesh over drywall, its like putting very strong veneer over thin foam board, the base layer is crap, it can move, which is not good for a stone veneer. if i were to mesh it i would mesh over plywood, not drywall.
concrete_joe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2015, 01:39 PM   #8
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 6
Rewards Points: 12
Default


Thanks Concrete Joe and stadry, Here is the stone.

The Rock is Travertine Splitface. Here is the picture of them front and back as well as the work site. They are about 1 inch thick or so. I don't have capstones for the sides. Would plywood and then mesh work instead of cement board?

The worksite for the rock wall will be in-between the red lines all the way up.

Ledgestone Indoor High Walls-dsc_1193.jpg

Ledgestone Indoor High Walls-dsc_1194.jpg

Name:  worksite.jpg
Views: 67
Size:  45.9 KB
dyluck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2015, 01:51 PM   #9
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 6
Rewards Points: 12
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by concrete_joe View Post
so, drywall is rather soft. i would remove the drywall and then screw on some 1/2" ply, then glue & screw 1/4" cement board over the ply (be sure to put correct side out for the stone). you then mortar per stone instructions. i am not sure how to finish the edges of the verticals if what you put on is thicker than existing drywall, does the stone have any reveal end pieces you can use?

if its 24" framing then i might opt for some 5/8" ply to keep bending between bays to a minimum. screw to studs only for best results.

use of a flexible "mortar" or "thinset" (one that can be used with the stone) would be best choice so that when things move a little the mortar doesnt crack and stone fall off, etc.

this 18ft wall, what does it sit on? slab? edge wall? is there enough support there? a sag in that bottom side can cause stone to break off, etc.
I will have to check the framing to see how close the studs are. I'm hoping they are 16" centers, but you never know! It was built in 99. I will find flexable mortar or thinset for sure. The wall is a perimeter wall, below it is the gap above the fireplace, the fireplace and below the wall is Wood ijoists resting on the basement foundation walls. Most are perpendicular to the main wall as the fireplace slot is a 2' cantilever.
dyluck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2015, 02:24 PM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 1,574
Rewards Points: 1,170
Default


Yes, remove the sheetrock, then screw 1/2" hardibacker, 16"x24" O.C. and use polymer modified thinset. You remove the sheetrock, by the way, not for strength, but to make a decent edge.
__________________
Advice is free, Lessons begin at 75 bucks an hour.
Tscarborough is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Tscarborough For This Useful Post:
jomama45 (08-18-2015), stadry (08-18-2015)
Old 08-18-2015, 09:00 PM   #11
Concrete & Masonry
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 3,343
Rewards Points: 346
Default


Listen to "concrete joe" if you prefer an uneducated guess.

Listen to "Tscarborough" if you want a proven installation.
jomama45 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2015, 12:28 AM   #12
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 1,304
Rewards Points: 2,600
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by jomama45 View Post
Listen to "concrete joe" if you prefer an uneducated guess.

Listen to "Tscarborough" if you want a proven installation.
right, i dont know nothing about it. what i do know is this, if the framing is more than 16" then you cant use the hardibacker by itself on the studs.
concrete_joe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2015, 08:34 AM   #13
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 6
Rewards Points: 12
Default


Thanks for everyone's input! If the studs are spaced greater then 16" OC I will use plywood behind hardibacker with polymer thinset. Otherwise just Hardibacker with polymer thinset. Do you have any other advise? If not, wish me luck!
dyluck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2015, 09:17 AM   #14
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 1,574
Rewards Points: 1,170
Default


The major issue with that particular type of stone is that the backs are sawn and are very smooth, and the stone is not very absorbent. Do not skimp on the price (it will be 18-30 bucks a bag) or amount used of the thinset.
__________________
Advice is free, Lessons begin at 75 bucks an hour.
Tscarborough is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2015, 11:08 AM   #15
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 1,304
Rewards Points: 2,600
Default


travertine is a limestone and is in fact very absorbent. or did you mean doesnt have a nice rough surface on backside for thinset to latch onto. really doesnt matter as the stone product itself will specify what type of thinset will work for the application.

Advertisement

concrete_joe is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Walls bowing out in large room hoffmandirt Building & Construction 8 07-14-2015 07:01 AM
Looking for confirmation these walls are not load-bearing walls jmai14 Remodeling 2 11-09-2013 09:28 PM
No Floating walls where there should be! DIY Master Building & Construction 1 02-23-2011 05:06 AM
Finishing Basement Walls, Inside Perimeter Drains, and Moisture, Oh My BSponz1 Building & Construction 1 02-08-2011 01:20 PM
load bearing walls worriedowner Building & Construction 3 02-02-2011 04:12 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

 

Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1