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-   -   'Laying' Wire Mesh (http://www.diychatroom.com/f105/laying-wire-mesh-175448/)

DaveLeeNC 03-25-2013 07:27 AM

'Laying' Wire Mesh
 
Hopefully this week I will be pouring my telescope pier pad (basically a cube of concrete requiring less than 0.5 yards of concrete). I have decided to go the sakrete route.

On general principles I have decided to use wire mesh. There is always lots of discussion about 'pulling' this stuff up vs. using little holder things to hold them, etc. In my case is there any reason not to just lay down a few inches of concrete and then just place a piece of wire mesh down, and repeat?

Also is there any reason not to simply line the entire 'hole in the ground' with plastic? I will be using a form but only for the top 6 inches or so.

Thanks.

dave (the clueless concrete guy)

Bondo 03-25-2013 09:26 AM

Quote:

Also is there any reason not to simply line the entire 'hole in the ground' with plastic? I will be using a form but only for the top 6 inches or so.
Ayuh,... The stability yer lookin' for, comes from not only the mass of the concrete, but also the square corners at the bottom of the block....
So,...
Make Sure the bottom has square corners, plastic or not...

DaveLeeNC 03-25-2013 09:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bondo (Post 1145215)
Ayuh,... The stability yer lookin' for, comes from not only the mass of the concrete, but also the square corners at the bottom of the block....
So,...
Make Sure the bottom has square corners, plastic or not...

Thanks for the comment. I certainly could make square corners with a form - would not be hard or expensive. But what is special about square (vs. round)? From a pure physics perspective I would think that round would be 'more efficient' as the bottom width for any direction of tilt is the same. Square would have weaker and stronger directional preferences.

I actually started out thinking of doing a column, until I priced great/big sonotube :( .

Thanks.

dave

ddawg16 03-25-2013 11:11 AM

Square? That one has me stumped as to what it actually means.

Given the size....I really doubt square vs round will make any difference...any difference at all.....unless I'm missing something. The weight on this thing is nothing compared to the actual weight of the concrete....so it's not a loading issue.

As for the wire...your basically putting it in to more or less hold everything together....your not going to have a heavy load on it so your not using it for strength. I would just try to get it as centered as possible....give or take an inch or so...

Since your going for weight....if you have some big rocks...yea...toss them in the hole...I see nothing wrong with having a few rocks sticking up into your slab...more weight...less vibration...as long as your slab has at least 25% of the rock in it...it should hold on pretty good.

Side note...went camping with my boys last weekend (1 week ago)...we were out in Jushua Tree....the night sky was gorgeous.....my younger son was pointing out a few items of note....Orions Belt...Big dipper....north star.....yea....I really need to get a good telescope....I'm thinking an 8" reflecting would be a nice size....

Bondo 03-25-2013 11:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DaveLeeNC (Post 1145234)
Thanks for the comment. I certainly could make square corners with a form - would not be hard or expensive. But what is special about square (vs. round)? From a pure physics perspective I would think that round would be 'more efficient' as the bottom width for any direction of tilt is the same. Square would have weaker and stronger directional preferences.

I actually started out thinking of doing a column, until I priced great/big sonotube :( .

Thanks.

dave

Ayuh,... From a pure physics perspective square cornered foundations are less likely to tip, at All...

ddawg16 03-25-2013 11:39 AM

Dave....how big is this pad going to be?

DaveLeeNC 03-25-2013 03:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ddawg16 (Post 1145341)
Dave....how big is this pad going to be?

Basically a cube 2 to 2.5 feet on a side. I've got a bunch of brick sized rocks that will be used to reduce the amount of concrete.

dave

ddawg16 03-25-2013 04:20 PM

So....4-5 sq ft......that b!tch will not be going anywhere...you could park a couple of tons on it and it's not going to move.

Make the corners anyway you want.

DaveLeeNC 03-25-2013 04:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ddawg16 (Post 1145591)
So....4-5 sq ft......that b!tch will not be going anywhere...you could park a couple of tons on it and it's not going to move.

Make the corners anyway you want.

There is an astronomy rule of thumb of using 10 pounds of pier pad for every pound of load. However, it isn't clear if the pier itself is part of the load or it is just the scope/drive/whatever. Clearly the pier (mostly being lower than the scope/etc) is a smaller consideration, so I scaled that back a bit (just my pier weighs 100 pounds) and came up with a target of 1200 pounds of pier pad.

Here in NC frost line issues are minimal so anything reasonable gets well below that.

dave


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