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-   -   Garage Concrete Pad (http://www.diychatroom.com/f105/garage-concrete-pad-181716/)

CheapCharlie 06-12-2013 07:08 AM

Garage Concrete Pad
 
I'm going to be building a 26'x34' shop. I want to do the site prep, forming, rebar and insulation myself. I'm going to get my foundation contractor to place and finish the conrete. What is the best way to start? I need a 1' thickened edge (1'x1') and am having a 4" slab. Do I lay my sub base out 26x34 and hand dig out the thickened edge? Or place my forms and compact the sub base in the middle after?

Be nice I'm learning...lol
Thanks.

joecaption 06-12-2013 07:36 AM

Why would you not be asking these question to the man that's going to be finishing your concrete?
There far more likly to know what your local codes and soil conditions area.
Around here we have to do a stem wall. Main reason is then the walls will be at least 6" above grade so the siding does not rot out' and less likly to end up with termite damage.
It also makes it so if you wanted to you could hose out the inside with no damage.

MTN REMODEL LLC 06-12-2013 08:08 AM

As Joe says... best to coordinate with your concrete contractor....

But I'm interested in what this reinforced edge for a SOG is all about.... around here we are same as Joe, we pour a stemwall (with spread T footer) for a garage slab. Besides getting 6" above grade exterior... you get a garage curb so your plate is not sitting in damp garage floor conditions.

So where is this perimeter reinforced slab applicable (I guess you could think of it as a 1' foot deep stem wall mono-pour.... sorta)

stadry 06-12-2013 09:56 AM

both responders address important points but i pick'd up on something else,,, ' do the site prep, forming, rebar and insulation myself ',,, WHY the mention of rebar since no one, especially aci, recommends it in a 4" slab ? yes, they do spec 2 bars in a turned down edge but that's it.

where's the insulation - under the sog, in the walls, or both :huh: ?


CheapCharlie 06-13-2013 12:23 AM

1 Attachment(s)
I know what the local codes are. I was mistaken in my first post. Up to 900 sqft I need a 6" slab with a 1' thinckened edge. Rebar 10M at 18" O/C. Insulation under the 6" slab (can't put under thickened edge) and insulation vertically around the ouside of the pad and out horizontally to prevent frost. This is seperate from my house build and I wanted to do most of it myself (except the concrete). Just looking for tips on how to get the thickened edge with the sub base compacted.

jomama45 06-14-2013 06:30 AM

I don't personally see anything wrong with any part of your plan, we do it in a similar fashion here all the time. As for 6" of protection from the soil, there's no reason you can't pour a curb on top of the slab at the same time, or lay a course of block afterwards. Both are very common here.

As for your actual questions, we always level the perimeter to the grade beam height, compact the perimeter, set forms on 3 sides, install gravel in center form open side, compact in 4" lifts, using the forms to establish finish grade........

MTN REMODEL LLC 06-14-2013 09:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jomama45 (Post 1200892)
I don't personally see anything wrong with any part of your plan, we do it in a similar fashion here all the time. As for 6" of protection from the soil, there's no reason you can't pour a curb on top of the slab at the same time, or lay a course of block afterwards. Both are very common here.

As for your actual questions, we always level the perimeter to the grade beam height, compact the perimeter, set forms on 3 sides, install gravel in center form open side, compact in 4" lifts, using the forms to establish finish grade........

Jomama.... Thanks... You guys are in freeze country like me and I've not really encountered this assembly for a SOG in freeze country....

it's sort of is a "floating slab" is it not.... ?

is it restricted to non-attached structures?

and does the insulation serve a non-frost heaving solution???

Best

Peter

ddawg16 06-14-2013 09:50 AM

cheapcharlie.....like you, I'm a cheap ba$tard....actually, poor is more accurate.....

Click on the garage build link in my signature and you see some pics of my garage build including the foundation. I highly suggest building a stem wall to put your walls on. Not only will it get your wood up above the wet ground, it does a great job of keeping water out of the garage.

nicktools561 06-14-2013 10:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CheapCharlie (Post 1199768)
Be nice I'm learning...lol

Aren't we all hahaha I love your honesty :thumbup:

Good luck, let us know how things are progressing!

jomama45 06-14-2013 06:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MTN REMODEL LLC (Post 1200980)
Jomama.... Thanks... You guys are in freeze country like me and I've not really encountered this assembly for a SOG in freeze country....

it's sort of is a "floating slab" is it not.... ?

is it restricted to non-attached structures?

and does the insulation serve a non-frost heaving solution???

Best

Peter

What the OP is looking to construct is more likely to fall into the category of an "Alaska Slab", as it relies on the foam on the exterior (horizontally) to limit frost penetration. Here, it's rare to install the exterior foam, and yes, it's nothing more than a floating slab. And yes, this type of foundation is typically limited to detached structures only, although in 20+ years of concrete/masonry work, I have done one legit job that involved tying an existing grade beam slab to a new foundation with frost walls. Lots of work, not typically worth it, but in that one scenario, it made the most sense. ANd we're no strangers to frost here, it's not uncommon for a sewer lateral to freeze here at 5' depth if it's through a driveway and on the North side of a building........

MTN REMODEL LLC 06-14-2013 06:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jomama45 (Post 1201291)
What the OP is looking to construct is more likely to fall into the category of an "Alaska Slab", as it relies on the foam on the exterior (horizontally) to limit frost penetration. Here, it's rare to install the exterior foam, and yes, it's nothing more than a floating slab. And yes, this type of foundation is typically limited to detached structures only, although in 20+ years of concrete/masonry work, I have done one legit job that involved tying an existing grade beam slab to a new foundation with frost walls. Lots of work, not typically worth it, but in that one scenario, it made the most sense. ANd we're no strangers to frost here, it's not uncommon for a sewer lateral to freeze here at 5' depth if it's through a driveway and on the North side of a building........

Great direct, clean explanatory answer...Thank Ya mama :thumbsup::)

john_bry 04-28-2015 12:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jomama45 (Post 1200892)
I don't personally see anything wrong with any part of your plan, we do it in a similar fashion here all the time. As for 6" of protection from the soil, there's no reason you can't pour a curb on top of the slab at the same time, or lay a course of block afterwards. Both are very common here.

As for your actual questions, we always level the perimeter to the grade beam height, compact the perimeter, set forms on 3 sides, install gravel in center form open side, compact in 4" lifts, using the forms to establish finish grade........

Hi Jomama

Can you (or anyone else) expound on how you would add the 6" curb?
I have a slab with a 3-1/2" tall curb around the perimeter. And trying to figure out how to frame the footings.

Questions in my mind:
Do you pour the curb on top of the slab when it is semi hard?
Do you have to add height to the forms during the pour?
How do you level the slab with the curb forms in the way?

jomama45 04-28-2015 04:52 PM

On a new pour, we form the entire curb ahead of time. It takes some time and thought (experience is best of course) to set a curb up strong enough not to move during the pour, yet strip out easy & fast so it can be finished with the rest of the slab. As for the slab itself, we finish to the bottom of the curb forms (the curb forms are "hung" in mid air via long steel stakes and propped back to the outside form) and "wet-screed" inside of the curb forms. I've always wanted to take a picture of a garage slab set-up and ready to pour, but I always forget. I realize it's not easy to envision.

If you're asking about adding a curb to an existing slab, a half course, or full course, of block might be easiest, but you certainly need to dowel into the existing properly........

john_bry 05-05-2015 12:14 PM

curb forms
 
Hi Jomama

A photo/ even hand sketch would be great, especially the
steel outriggers your talking about.

Thanks allot!

For my garage, I am fine to leave the curb forms in place as the concrete sets. Do I really need to remove them?


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