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-   -   Damp concrete floor (http://www.diychatroom.com/f105/damp-concrete-floor-133950/)

hardwick46 02-16-2012 12:26 PM

Damp concrete floor
 
My house, which is 2 years old, has a full basement that is poured concrete. I have been finishing the basement and I am now ready to do flooring. I had a flooring company come out and look and the floor and they tested it for moisture. The readings came back that the concrete was around 16% moisture which was very high. The floor and basement are both very dry. My house sits on the peak of a small hill and the sump pit hasn't ever had a drop of water in it and we have had several wet seasons. Several moths ago I had a radon system installed and when we drilled through the basement floor there was zero moisture under the slab. There isn't a vapor barrier under the slab though. The floor had a sealer applied to it after the pour. I have a dehumidifer running in the basement and it does not run very often and maintains a humidity of 40% very easily. I am very confused as to why my slab is so wet. Does anyone have any ideas as to why or how I can fix it? Thanks1

joecaption 02-16-2012 12:37 PM

Sounds like your doing all the right things.
Around here we have to have a vaper barrier and foam under the slab, to late now for you though.
May still be able to use an engineered flooring is you add a cork vaper barrier.

hardwick46 02-16-2012 12:41 PM

Thanks for the reply. Won't I have to worry about mold growing on the cork with the moisture coming out of my floor?

jaydevries 02-16-2012 02:31 PM

it is why a vapor barrier is used due to thermal transfer causing moisture if i remember correctly same reason you use vapor barrier on insulated exterior walls i would look into "research" using a concrete sealing paint "like drylock" as a solution

Nailbags 02-16-2012 05:27 PM

All ground gives off moisture vapor I don't care if your in the dessert or in a rain forest the ground gives off moisture. When Cement is poured in a slab a real contractor that does not cut corners will lay down a 8-15 mil thick vapor barrier why? because concrete is porous and moisture vapor will migrate up and through the slab. Not much you can do now.

Nailbags 02-16-2012 05:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jaydevries (Post 855151)
it is why a vapor barrier is used due to thermal transfer causing moisture if i remember correctly same reason you use vapor barrier on insulated exterior walls i would look into "research" using a concrete sealing paint "like drylock" as a solution

a good link here http://www.concretenetwork.com/vapor-barriers/

Gary in WA 02-16-2012 11:08 PM

You have a few choices, after the fact. Delta FL is one, or Fig. 2- just closed-cell foamboard, or Dricore, fig. 3: http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...ms?full_view=1

Photo 3, if you have the height (same as other, just more detail): http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...g-your-basment

Gary

hardwick46 02-17-2012 09:07 AM

Those are great links. Thanks a lot for the info. My only problem with closed cell foamboard is that it usually requires a thermal barrier. Any way to get around that? I also looked into a product called Place N Go flooring that has dimpled underlayment covered with a piece of vinyl tile. Ceramic sounds like it
might be my best bet though.

framer52 02-17-2012 09:54 AM

I would use
Dricore or tile.

hardwick46 02-20-2012 07:41 AM

If i use tile do I need to use any special kind of thinset for the concrete? Any special kind of grout? Thanks.


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