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Old 05-29-2013, 01:12 PM   #1
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Concrete ramp


Hi guys

I have a small gravel ramp at my cottage we use for a boat launch, at this point it has been excavated down to rock, then filled with large gravel. It works "ok" but after looking at my neighbours cement ramp I am thinking of going that route. The ramp I have is a pretty steep angle, but, because of the way the land lyes it would take a ton of landscaping/excavating to change it.

I can do the "forming" myself since its not a basement floor and doesn't need to be perfect, and had considered doing it in sections, a little at a time, the total size will be about 12ft wide and 20 feet long

Ok, here is the (dumb?) question:

How do I keep the cement at consistant angle? In other words how do I stop gravity from pulling the cement down to the bottom of the ramp?

Sorry for the newbie question, and Thanks! For the input

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Old 05-29-2013, 03:17 PM   #2
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Hi guys

I have a small gravel ramp at my cottage we use for a boat launch, at this point it has been excavated down to rock, then filled with large gravel. It works "ok" but after looking at my neighbours cement ramp I am thinking of going that route. The ramp I have is a pretty steep angle, but, because of the way the land lyes it would take a ton of landscaping/excavating to change it.

I can do the "forming" myself since its not a basement floor and doesn't need to be perfect, and had considered doing it in sections, a little at a time, the total size will be about 12ft wide and 20 feet long

Ok, here is the (dumb?) question:

How do I keep the cement at consistant angle? In other words how do I stop gravity from pulling the cement down to the bottom of the ramp?

Sorry for the newbie question, and Thanks! For the input

What do you call " A little at a time"????

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Old 05-29-2013, 04:36 PM   #3
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I am thinking 8 or 10 feet at a time, whatever I can do with a large cement mixer
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Old 05-29-2013, 06:27 PM   #4
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I am thinking 8 or 10 feet at a time, whatever I can do with a large cement mixer

That would work okay,split your width down the middle so it's 6' and do 4 pours of 6'x10',put a bulkhead in at the 10' point and keep the slump down to 2-3" and you should be good to go,i assume you'll have some help with this as it's not a one man job,the more help the better.
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Old 05-29-2013, 07:25 PM   #5
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Good idea!

I will make sure I have a few extra sets of hands to help, any ideas of recipes to use to get a good ramp and/or concrete that wont "run" down the ramp before it dries?

Thanks!

Michael
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Old 05-29-2013, 08:07 PM   #6
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[QUOTE=n2omichael;1190594]Good idea!

I will make sure I have a few extra sets of hands to help, any ideas of recipes to use to get a good ramp and/or concrete that wont "run" down the ramp before it dries?

Thanks!

Don't know of any batch designs for small quantities,but the reason for a lower slump (drier mix) is to keep it from "running " down the ramp.

Forgot to say you should be able to find a decent mix if you google it.
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Old 05-29-2013, 09:11 PM   #7
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Mixing concrete by hand or even in small batches with a portable mixer is a lot of work. If you are using a pre mix product like quickcrete it will take 178 60# bags to pour your slab 4 inches thick. If you are using bulk sand and gravel with portland you will be shoveling it in the mixer all day long. And to top it off if you won't save enough to matter, especially if you have to rent the mixer.

Get your forms set, use more stakes than you think you will need. Concrete is very heavy and can push the forms out if not adequately supported. Skip the wire mesh and go straight for rebar, lay it out, tie it and support it. Find a friend or hire a helper that knows at least a little about pouring and finishing concrete, then call a ready mix truck, pour the whole thing at once and pay the bill. You will end up with a much better slab in the long run. You can still save a lot by doing it yourself, but some things cost money because they are worth it. Most people severely underestimate just how much work even a small slab can be. Having poured probably over a thousand yards of concrete over the years I would not even consider mixing anything that size by hand, no matter how many sections you divide it into.
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Old 05-29-2013, 09:48 PM   #8
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Unless you're on a small island somewhere, get it in a truck. Even if you have to wheelbarrow it a few hundred feet, it's a lot less work than mixing all those bags.

When ordering, specify a 4000psi 3/4 mix with air and fibers, at a 3" slump maximum. With the fibers you can probably forgo the steel. There are a few guys on this site that will argue vehemently on both sides of that, but I just poured this same mix the other day for some guys I trust completely, and they'll be driving tractor trailers and heavy equipment over the slab. No rebar, no mesh.
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Old 05-29-2013, 09:54 PM   #9
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LOL, sadly, we ARE on an island, Wolfe Island actually, there is a good sized ferry (55 cars) that trucks can travel on, but they really hose you for travel time to come to the "Island"

If it takes a few summers I am good with that, I could post a pic of the ramp as it is now if that would help?

I have done some cement work, mostly footings and sonotubes, but this will be my first job this large. Sounds like I need to weigh my options!
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Old 05-30-2013, 06:28 AM   #10
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Sounds like your neighbor would be a good source of info. Could this ramp be made of wood? Three guys did an apron of a small driveway by hand. Order that truck what ever you have to do. We were using up bags of concrete, if I had to pay the other two guys and buy the cement it would have been a lot more than just ordering a truck.
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Old 05-30-2013, 12:21 PM   #11
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You need a few cu.yds. Someone else on your island may need several yards also. Call your ready mix guys and see if they can coordinate two pours. You could even share the wheelbarrows and crews. Ask around.
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Old 05-30-2013, 01:34 PM   #12
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I didn't calculate it, but if you need several yards, you'd probably still be money ahead getting a truck and paying for the time.
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Old 05-30-2013, 03:44 PM   #13
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I did a subbasement (my own) which was 20 X 20'.

I broke it into 4 20x5 pours over 4 days (not counting prep of vapor barrier and rebar).

My subbasement was very inaccesable (although not on an island) and a truck and pumper was just not economic for the project.

Furthermore, with a truck I would have needed a pour/finish crew, which would have been additional cost.

Actually, it was not that difficult. Working alone, at my convenience, I would mix....pour some, screed, mix, pour, finish sections and just work steadily forward.

Thee toughest part was carring 200 80lb bags down the hill and into the subbasement.

I was a level pour... but I don't think that mattered that much if your slope is not terrible.

Now the drawback was that you end up with cold joints. You'll want to tie those pours together real well.... I used rebar throughout and remesh accross the cold joints. I did also use that bonding agent at the cold pours.

Obviously I'm not driving accross it, but I'm sure I could. It's been prpbably 10 years, with no cracking (I had control joints in but they haven't been cracking) and no water moisture migration.

I would not recommend it forproduction work obviously... but if ya just take your time... I think you can do it fine.

Best

Peter

Edit: If you are on a pretty steep slope, you may want a helper that can keep screeding any slump back level untill you get intial set. There is a chemical product (powder) that makes concrete "thixotropic", which means it takes a set relatively quickly once it is not in motion. The set is not per se an initial set, and the chemical is not an accelerator.... It just sorta thickens when not in motion (ie when not mixing , pouring, screeding.)

Just for laughts, went and calculated it, and my total pour was about 5 yards... so I was pouring about 1.25 yards each day that I went down there.
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Old 05-30-2013, 03:53 PM   #14
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Aren't you going to have to run this ramp at least ten or fifteen feet down underwater? How is this going to work out, stretching the work out over a couple of Summers?
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Old 05-30-2013, 04:01 PM   #15
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Aren't you going to have to run this ramp at least ten or fifteen feet down underwater? How is this going to work out, stretching the work out over a couple of Summers?
Thanks Willie....Oh Yea.... forgot to ask you about that... I don't know how you pour underwater.... and curious

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