DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Concrete, Stone & Masonry (http://www.diychatroom.com/f105/)
-   -   concrete porch issues.... need help (http://www.diychatroom.com/f105/concrete-porch-issues-need-help-143386/)

JulesB 05-10-2012 09:23 PM

concrete porch issues.... need help
 
Needing some advise on what should be done with my little sister's concrete front porch. I'd like to think of myself as the king DIYer, but this one is probably best left to the pros.

Here's the facts:

- looking for cheapest long-term fix
- Porch area approx. 300 sq. ft.
- home built in the late 20's w/ stone foundation
- root/storm cellar underneath porch
- cellar ceiling leaking in several places, both at the perimeter, And centrally

My uneducated thoughts are these. The porch level sits better than 3 inches below the front door threshold, and very conveniently, the bottom porch step (see photo) is very shallow. Where I'm going with this is, could it be capped with 2-3inches of concrete, including the steps? Assuming an engineer "approves" of the added weight?
This might all be great, except for the heavy crumbling corners? Perhaps the porch could be cantilevered well past the existing corners?? Just thinking out loud here........ could the corners be "trimmed" down so there's more mass in the new pour??

Any and all input greatly appreciated.
Regards,
Jules



http://i599.photobucket.com/albums/t...k/IMG_5451.jpg

http://i599.photobucket.com/albums/t...k/IMG_5452.jpg

http://i599.photobucket.com/albums/t...k/IMG_5454.jpg

http://i599.photobucket.com/albums/t...k/IMG_5453.jpg

http://i599.photobucket.com/albums/t...k/IMG_5456.jpg

http://i599.photobucket.com/albums/t...k/IMG_5455.jpg

Canarywood1 05-10-2012 09:30 PM

That porch looks like it's well past it's intended lifetime, looks like a new porch is in order if you want to do it right.

joecaption 05-10-2012 09:33 PM

I agree, lokk under it and see if all the old steel holding it up is not also rusted out and leaking.

jaydevries 05-10-2012 09:34 PM

you said it has a cellar below. so can you see the bad concrete from from below in cellar and is there any type of support in cellar for porch concrete slab"i beam or joist"

and julesb thank you for a great forum with a location and plenty of great pics

joecaption 05-10-2012 09:37 PM

I agree, look under it and see if all the old steel holding it up is not also rusted out and leaking.

cortell 05-10-2012 10:05 PM

I definitely would not add 2-3 inches of concrete. Besides the additional and possibly dangerous weight on the support structure beneath, there's a reason there's a 3-4" drop off at the door. That helps prevent rain and snow from getting inside. You're really limited here. That crack down the middle looks really bad. If your main concern is preventing water penetration, and you want to punt the problem down the road, and, as other have suggested, the structure beneath looks OK, you may want to look at applying some sort of waterproofing product. Perhaps a layer of bitumen modified polyurethane, though that would probably need some sort of topcoat. I just don't know. I would consult with a reputable contractor in your area for his opinion. Personally, I'd just bite the bullet and get it re-poured. I'm not a big fan of spending a bunch of money on band-aids; they rarely work.

Also, it appears to me the cats may have some ideas.

JulesB 05-11-2012 10:58 AM

Thanks all, for the replies.

I agree, the best solution is replacement. That may not be finaincially feasible at this point though. Thus my post here, for possible outside-the-box options.

I've requested more pics from my sister. Specifically of the underside of the slab and any supports. I'll get those posted as soon as they are made available.

I suggested looking into the possibility of laying and grouting cut stones of some sort. But I'm worried that the general condition of the concret would cause the grout lines to crack out, and leak again. Any really great sealers out there?? Specifically something that one can lay an adherent over the top??

Thanks again!
Jules

JulesB 05-11-2012 11:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cortell (Post 919053)
Perhaps a layer of bitumen modified polyurethane, though that would probably need some sort of topcoat.
Also, it appears to me the cats may have some ideas.

Not fimiliar with the product. I'll do some research.

And yes, if only the cats could talk, I'm sure their advise would be sound........

cortell 05-11-2012 11:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JulesB (Post 919312)
Thanks all, for the replies.

I agree, the best solution is replacement. That may not be finaincially feasible at this point though. Thus my post here, for possible outside-the-box options.

I've requested more pics from my sister. Specifically of the underside of the slab and any supports. I'll get those posted as soon as they are made available.

I suggested looking into the possibility of laying and grouting cut stones of some sort. But I'm worried that the general condition of the concret would cause the grout lines to crack out, and leak again. Any really great sealers out there?? Specifically something that one can lay an adherent over the top??

Thanks again!
Jules

Stone and grout are far from waterproofing solutions. Assuming that addressing the leaks is one of your primary objectives, forget about that idea...unless you want to spend a lot of money to not fix the problem (not to mention concerns of overloading the supports underneath). I.e., your idea has three major strikes against it: not cheap, and not going to work, and possibly dangerous.

I suggested researching bitumen-modified polyurethane. It can seal cracks up to 1/8". It's typically used for foundation wall waterproofing, but you might be able to use it with an additional topcoat to band-aid the problem. I would make sure to try to achieve a 1/8" per foot slope with the topcoat, if possible. You do not want water pooling for days over the cracks; I don't think any waterproofing coating would hold up to that for very long.

Evstarr 05-11-2012 11:45 AM

As a bandaid I would consider cleaning and widening the surface cracks and using an epoxy sealer for at least the short term. The edge leaks need better pics to help with

JulesB 05-14-2012 11:44 AM

MOre Pics
 
Here's a few interior pics. Unfortunately, I don't have any good references/placement/measurements to offer, at this time.

http://i599.photobucket.com/albums/t...k/IMG_5510.jpg

http://i599.photobucket.com/albums/t...k/IMG_5504.jpg

http://i599.photobucket.com/albums/t...k/IMG_5509.jpg

http://i599.photobucket.com/albums/t...k/IMG_5508.jpg

http://i599.photobucket.com/albums/t...k/IMG_5506.jpg

AtlanticWBConst. 05-14-2012 12:08 PM

Turn the room into a SHTF bunker

:-)

biggles 05-16-2012 11:43 PM

whatever you do concrete wise..ace that roof gutter run off right onto the concrete :wink:.cap it off within the gutter letting the rain run off going to the other end.then make sure that runs away from the foundation

JulesB 05-17-2012 10:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by biggles (Post 923129)
whatever you do concrete wise..ace that roof gutter run off right onto the concrete :wink:.cap it off within the gutter letting the rain run off going to the other end.then make sure that runs away from the foundation

Very good point. That gutter dumps right on the major crack. I'm sure that's part of the problem.
Thanks for the input.

Concreteguy 05-17-2012 03:37 PM

Replacing it would be best..but for a repair...you could remove any of the loose concrete. Use a product like rapid set from cement all to repair the big voids.

Use a water proofing membrane like pro-red. It helps make a bond for cement style glues, and water proofs. They use it for tiling, water features, and showers.

Do a concrete overlay over the top. This should solve all of your problems. The cost shouldn't be near what it would be to replace a suspended slab.

Whatever you can do to divert outside water the better.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:30 PM.