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Old 01-18-2013, 03:54 PM   #1
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Concrete over brick over post tension slab


I have a "covered patio" that is within the footprint of my house (covered by the house roof, surrounded on three sides by exterior house walls, open to the outside on the fourth side. Essentially it is a room with the outside wall missing).

It is about 12 x 18 and I am converting it to living space by raising the floor and putting in a sliding door across the opening.

There is a post-tension slab below the patio, connected to the house slab on either side. The patio slab is about 4" below the house slab. On top of the patio slab is a brick veneer floor.

In order to bring the patio up to the level of the house slab, I need to add 0.5 to 1.5 inches. The patio is sloped, so that is the reason for the variance.

The engineer says we can float concrete atop the brick veneer, no rebar or mesh is needed.

The contractor wants to use self-leveling underlayment. LevelQuik ES can be applied up to 2" thick.

What would you guys do?
Can you do concrete only 0.5" thick?


Last edited by M3 Pete; 01-18-2013 at 04:43 PM. Reason: Changed thickness to 0.5 - 1.5 inches, and found you can use ES up to 2" thick in one application
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Old 01-18-2013, 04:02 PM   #2
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Concrete over brick over post tension slab


I thought I had a pretty unique situation, but here is another thread with a similar question.

Slab on slab to raise floor

Mine is a bit different though, since I have less height needed on one end.

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Old 01-19-2013, 05:33 AM   #3
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Concrete over brick over post tension slab


of course you can - we've placed conc only 1/8" thick,,, placing skills are more dependent on materials than pro-trowel-ability,,, not sure who's mtl i'd be using over brick, tho,,, if it were mine, i'd remove the skin brick 1st & get down to real conc but that's because i don't know a mtl that will properly adhere to brick [ hint: don't waste gas asking the guys in aprons or vests - they won't either ] head for a pro supply house & look for a hi flexural strength as compressive strengths typically are over 5,000psi
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if you hear it from a guy in the apron store, be VERY suspicious the mtl/method will work,,, when it time to build something together, they won't answer phones NOR help
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Old 01-19-2013, 06:44 PM   #4
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Concrete over brick over post tension slab


Quote:
Originally Posted by M3 Pete View Post
I thought I had a pretty unique situation, but here is another thread with a similar question.

Slab on slab to raise floor

Mine is a bit different though, since I have less height needed on one end.

You could do your's with sleepers,just like was suggested for his floor,the concrete your talking about will only be 1/2 to 3/4 of a yard, and the reason you don't need wire is the post tension slab,and the concrete would only be fill to level things up,so strength is not required.

Just be sure you use treated lumber for the sleepers.
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Old 01-19-2013, 08:48 PM   #5
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Concrete over brick over post tension slab


that other thread was asking about 3 or 3 1/2" as i recall,,, IF you want only 1/2", get a gauge rake from midwest tool ( no financial interest ) w/1/2" cams,,, placing wire in 1/2" is like hoping obama-yo-mama trips, falls, hits his head, & can't be inaugurated,,, unfortunately we'd have biden who's a complete idiot im-n-s-h-fo sleepers = screed bars for this job so don't try reinventing the wheel,,, you still need compressive & flexural strength - tension is not as critical HOWEVER you'll need to place a BONDED overlay.

wire, my patoot ! in 1/2" ? ? ? nfw,,, you won't even be able to cover coarse aggregate IF you use regular conc,,, this requires a specialty bag mix,,, usually 1bag yields 20sf @ 1/4" depth ( 10sf @ 1/2" ),,, your contractor's on the right track,,, hopefully he' got the right experience ( base prep/technique/skill ) to complete it properly,,, in the 1 1/2" depth, add 1/4" coarse aggregate to increase sf of yield - as you move to the thinner o'lay, delete it - good luck !
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if you hear it from a guy in the apron store, be VERY suspicious the mtl/method will work,,, when it time to build something together, they won't answer phones NOR help

Last edited by itsreallyconc; 01-20-2013 at 05:58 AM.
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Old 01-21-2013, 12:53 PM   #6
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Concrete over brick over post tension slab


Thanks guys. My contractor is now looking at Level Set
Deep Pour 3 Underlayment by ProSpec, which can be poured in 3" lifts.

It has 3500 psi compressive and 700 psi flexural strength.

Their Level Set 200 and 300 have higher compressive strength, 5000 and 5500 psi, and 1050 and 1100 flexural, but is that needed in residential flooring?
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Old 01-21-2013, 05:37 PM   #7
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Concrete over brick over post tension slab


Quote:
Originally Posted by M3 Pete View Post
Thanks guys. My contractor is now looking at Level Set
Deep Pour 3 Underlayment by ProSpec, which can be poured in 3" lifts.

It has 3500 psi compressive and 700 psi flexural strength.

Their Level Set 200 and 300 have higher compressive strength, 5000 and 5500 psi, and 1050 and 1100 flexural, but is that needed in residential flooring?

I doubt very much you would need to go with anything stronger than the 3500 psi,as your post tensioned slab alone would be sufficent to take the added weight,don't know if your familiar with how post tension is done,but will add a link to show how your slab probably looked before it was poured.

http://www.structuremag.org/article.aspx?articleID=1053

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