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Old 01-19-2014, 03:27 PM   #1
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Cinder Block Foundation Repair


I have two areas I wish to re-coat:
1) Cinder block exterior foundation
2) Cinder block basement walls

I would like to know which product you recommend for applying a smooth uniform coat. The walls are exposed cinder block with mortar and very rough, but mostly intact with few mortar cracks.

I am doing this mostly for aesthetics and further protection from erosion at least on the exterior part.

In the basement, it would be great if this was either a light colored coating or something I could paint over so I can lighten up the "Silence of the Lambs" basement I currently have.

I believe this is called "parging" but I'm still doing my research. Thanks!

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Old 01-19-2014, 07:26 PM   #2
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It is called Parging for the outside. As for the inside, more lighting and Ugl Drylok, which you can have tinted to the color you want.

Really if you are worried about water coming through, you need to fix that first, by either digging around all four sides of the foundation, having weeping tile put in. The after the outside walls are pressure washed clean, use the Coating on them, then the membrane, which will allow any water to go down to the weeping tile, then fill with rock and replace all dirt dug out.

That is the more expensive way. Cheaper way for a dry basement, is to install a perimeter French drain/weeping system inside around the foundation, then use the same fabric which is used on the outside, placed so that any water that comes through the walls, goes down to the weeping tile. Then you cover the tile with Cement, then put up real walls that are about an 1" off the wall, insulate, cover with Drywall, tape & mud, then paint.

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Old 01-19-2014, 08:17 PM   #3
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Cinder Block Foundation Repair


If you are intent on plastering the interior side of the walls, I would recommend a fiber-reinforced plaster. It was initially offered under the brand name "surewall" and came in white and gray.

It is sold in Menards under another name. I'm not sure if they have it in white, or only gray. You can plaster this on with one or two coats. If you use the white as your final coat, you won't need to paint it. It is a bright white.

Regarding the exterior, typically the exterior is back plastered a few courses at a time from the interior as the walls are being built. One might lay up four courses of block, then reach over the wall with a trowel and plaster those four courses and so on until the top of the wall was reached. The plaster could stop below the top of the wall if you didn't want it above grade.

I don't remember the exact recipe for this plaster, but I'm sure someone else will contribute. It may have been a full load of masonry mortar with 1/2 sack of portland added with extra water of course. This layer of plaster could be 1/2" thick.

After the wall was finished, one would go in the trench on the exterior and waterproof with some tar-like product using a thick brush.

If you just want to spruce up the part of the wall above grade, you may consider whether gray or white would work. Then plaster the outside with this fiberglass reinforced plaster and call it good. You'll want to landscape with something which will keep the area around the wall clean-river rock, some other decorative rock, etc. It won't look good if mud splatters up on it.

Normally, people paint this above grade portion and then you have to deal with peeling paint, etc. for the rest of your life.
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Old 01-19-2014, 08:19 PM   #4
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Cinder Block Foundation Repair


As Gregzoll stated, your main body of work on this has to be done on the exterior. That's where the problem lies as far as waterproofing your basement. UGL is a good product to use on the interior but its' main purpose is to stop SMALL migrations of moisture through the block. It will NOT stop any kind of steady water flow. So, in reality, if you properly take care of the exterior, you can apply a regular interior latex paint on your block basement walls………you really won't need to use the UGL which can be difficult to apply because of its thickness. Also, it cannot be applied to any walls that already have paint on them.
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Old 01-19-2014, 11:00 PM   #5
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He didn't mention anything about waterproofing.

I think when he was talking about erosion, he was referring to the mortar in the joints deteriorating.
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Old 01-19-2014, 11:40 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cleveman View Post
He didn't mention anything about waterproofing.

I think when he was talking about erosion, he was referring to the mortar in the joints deteriorating.
He will still have to fix it from the outside. Just putting something up on the inside, is not going to solve the problem. A lot of old homes have issue with the mortar coming loose out of the joints, for bricks and Cinder/Concrete blocks. Especially if you have high concentrations of Salt in the rain water, Acid Rain from the environment in the area you live in (Smelting or Steel plant, Coke plant in your area), or even was originally just a bad mix to begin with.

Either way, they have two ways to fix or solve this. They also if you had read, are looking at a way to brighten the interior. That means painting it as they asked. Which would entail some type of coating on the block or concrete foundation walls, and more lighting.

Personally you are better to fix it from the outside in, tuck and point, then Parge the exterior or Interior, waterproof the outside, so that you can finish the interior.

Plus side is that if you do finish the interior, your heating bills will go down, due to the basement will be warmer.
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Old 01-29-2014, 10:34 AM   #7
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I'm not a fan of french drains on the inside of the basement.
I know in some situations it's all you can do and it is cheaper but at that point you've lost the battle for a dry basement and now your just trying to manage the consequences.

Gymschu.........you mentioned a product called UGL.
I'm not familiar with that but if you want to attempt to water proof the foundation from the inside there is only one way to do it.
You need a liquid product that penetrates the concrete and crystallizes in the concrete wall.
One product is Xypex but there are others.
It works but it has it's limits and should not be counted on as a replacement for proper foundation exterior sealing and drainage.

Last edited by Gary Evans; 01-29-2014 at 10:37 AM.
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Old 01-29-2014, 12:44 PM   #8
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agree, gary,,, doubtful many ARE fans of interior drains, sumps, & pumps but, considering method/expense/feasibility of retro work, they're often customer's solution to leak remediation,,, waterproofing is only done outside - inside its caller ' water management '

ugl's ' ---lock ' is possibly the world leading seller of ' leak-stopping stuff that doesn't exactly ' but its a big seller for the apron/vest stores,,, i'm not a fan but it has uses ( eg, treating a leaking wall prior to selling then disclosing same to buyer ),,, IF it truly did, the leak's still inside your wall(s) - there the lime ( 1 of cement's ingredients ) is subject to soil/rain acid attack

kryton / xypex are crystalline penetrating waterproofing compounds often spec'd by engineers/architects/specifiers,,, to me, ' ---lock ' seems a latex paint fortified w/cement & various modifiers but i could be wrong
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Old 01-29-2014, 01:42 PM   #9
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Any paint on product that tries to stop water on the inside after it has penetrated the foundation is only a temporary fix.......band aid would be a better way to describe it.

Yes, french drains with sump pumps is for many people an affordable way to deal with water in the basement.
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Old 01-29-2014, 01:57 PM   #10
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If fixing a basement water problem from the outside is impossible there is way to fix it permanently on the inside that will give you a dry, safe, finished living space in the basement.

It uses a modified french drain system with a sump combined with some exterior waterproofing technology .
There's a lot of details to it and I have to get going.......so maybe the other experts here know what I'm talking about.

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Old 01-29-2014, 04:11 PM   #11
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Could be something like this.
http://www.deltamembranes.com/
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Old 01-29-2014, 07:45 PM   #12
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That's pretty close stuart.
Same basic idea, you need a drainage layer next to the inside of the foundation but sealed off from the basement.
This drainage layer which is very similar to Delta MS or Superseal then drains to below floor level into a weeper system ( similar to french drain but covered).
A sump then pumps the water away.

As luck would have it a Holmes on Homes episode called "Attic Dealbreaker" is on DIY right now and it shows a contractor installing something like this for Mike.
It's important this drainage system is completely sealed off from the basement living area and in this show they do it with spray foam insulation after the stud wall is installed.
And it worked real well.

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Old 01-29-2014, 07:45 PM   #13
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While were on the subject of Mikes Holmes and concrete......

In one of his shows recently Mike is replacing a concrete front step on a house.

He takes out the old steps ( about 4 or 5 rises ) and digs down about 5 feet.
The top landing stayed.
So he has a hole about 12' long by 5 feet wide and 5 feet deep.

He then fills this hole 1/2 full of fibremesh concrete for just the footing, this is just about the most expensive concrete you can get.
That's over 5 cubic yards of concrete !
Then he cribs the steps and fills the rest up.......another 6 or 7 yrds.

Good thing the show is paying for all that........lol, problem is now people who watched that show will think footings for steps need to be 2 1/2 feet thick using fibremesh concrete.
And it's a good thing there was a parging going over that step after, otherwise Mike would have had a rough time finishing them with all those fibres poking up.

He never explained that.......that you shouldn't use fibremesh concrete for concrete you have to finish.

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Old 01-30-2014, 11:21 PM   #14
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Lol, I want to do that!

Problem I see with Dryloc (both water/oil based- latter warranted waterproof) is stopping capillary wicking or soil pressure drive through the porous block sends moisture to collect in the empty cells where it will drain into the room later, either through the slab/block joint or the bottom courses of block as they fill up. Effectively collecting water and giving it more height (head) = more pressure to gain access where before it is more manageable in multiple areas rather than localized now.

Could use foam board with a drainage system, channels cut in back side/vertical glue application only of FB, thick enough to prevent interior air condensation on inside face, Fig. 15- or 16... http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...Gq3ToLZQruI9mg

Rather than demo/re-pour driveway concrete- though IMO FB or drainage mat/FB than FG panels; http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...d.cGU&cad=rja;

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Old 01-31-2014, 07:31 AM   #15
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'lock's great IF you're soon selling & must disclose since most don't know dick ( nixon ) about wtr ( proofing / management ) they will, however, recognize the brand

for interior work, we prefer ' waffleboard ' ( miradrain - no $ interest ) avail from many suppliers under different marketing names / brands,,, down here, even apron/vest stores are now selling it.

BIG 10-4 on fiber useless im-n-s-h-fo altho we often see it spec'd,,, IF we must finish fiber conc for decorative purposes, we use propane weedburner torches

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