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-   -   Can Travertine Pavers be used in Cold areas with strong sun? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f105/can-travertine-pavers-used-cold-areas-strong-sun-147836/)

peakcelln 06-21-2012 06:39 PM

Can Travertine Pavers be used in Cold areas with strong sun?
 
I am exploring using Travertine Pavers on a raised deck. They will be sitting on a grate that is attached to deck joists, so trapped moisture and upheaval will not be a problem. I will have landscaping fabric directly under the travertine to catch sand/polymer/stone dust or what ever I use.

My problem is I have read conflicting "Facts" all over the internet. Some say travertine cannot be used in freeze/thaw climates and it will turn to "Powder"; some say it can be used but needs a permeating Sealer. Some say it needs the permeating sealer and another type of a sealer. I've also read the sealer will yellow in the sun and will, and, or will need to be stripped every tyear and reapplied. I have extremely strong sun and UV rays year round. I live in Colorado, so snow and severe temperature swings of 60 degrees in a day are common. It can also get up to 105 in the summer. I'm trying to get the best look, longevity, and low maintainence I dont have to work on every year with the exception of a power wash.

I have also read the polymer sand is best, but others say it will crack in cold/wet weather. Others say the stone dust is best, but will need to be re-applied every year.

I would really appreciate some Pro's with real life experiences with Travertine in cold zones input. THANX!!

TRUEPRO 06-22-2012 02:08 AM

Travertine is a very soft, natural stone. I would never recommend travertine for outdoor use. Despite countless layers of sealer, it can still absorb water and spall. If they made glazed travertine pavers then maybe...

peakcelln 06-22-2012 01:04 PM

Then why do so many "Pro's" swear by it? Strange.. Would 3cm Granite Pavers work? What would there maintainence be?

TRUEPRO 06-22-2012 01:44 PM

Granite is def a good stone for outdoor applications. Not sure what pros would swear by using travertine outdoors but maybe im wrong and theirs other products specifically for outdoors idk.

peakcelln 06-26-2012 11:40 AM

It's amazing to me how the more I research this, the more diversity of opinion there is. I have a feeling I'm not going to risk it and go with possibly using Granite. It's probably going to be very hot, but I'll get a light gray and white mix and hopefully it wont be that bad. It cant be worse than Composite encapsulated, which I've read several times, is unbearably hot in a strong sun; along with all the other problems it has.

TRUEPRO 07-02-2012 08:43 PM

After extensive research, i have determined that travertine is indeed a very suitable material for outdoor application. Sorry for the mixed reviews but this is my final determination.

GL

Daniel Holzman 07-02-2012 09:05 PM

I have never used travertine in either an indoor or outdoor application, so I have no opinion on its suitability for use in an outdoor application. I have used outdoor rated brick successfully in a walkway, granite stones in a wall, cut granite edging on a walkway, slate, and sandstone in walkways, all successfully. I am curious exactly what research TRUEPRO did in the 10 days between declaring that travertine was totally unsuitable as an outdoor material until today that convinced him that travertine was a very suitable material.

oh'mike 07-02-2012 09:26 PM

I'm curious too--that is one of the softest and most absorbent of the marbles---

Well? A vision in a dream? Doby whispered the answer? You found a well researched study?

peakcelln 07-03-2012 12:08 PM

I know travertine is good in outside applications. The Collisium in Rome is built with it, and it's been around a couple of years. What i need to know, and keep getting conflicting info about, is it good in a freeze/thaw severe temperature swing area. That's the $64k question....

oh'mike 07-03-2012 12:18 PM

My opinion? No --it is highly absorbent--the water inside the stone will freeze and break down the material--

Granite--if very dense will do well---

TRUEPRO 07-03-2012 05:20 PM

Actually, i found travertine to be used for pool coping quite often. I have only ever used it for tile jobs but if some of the biggest and best pool companies are using it on 100k pools then apparently its good to go? fawkidk

oh'mike 07-03-2012 05:27 PM

I'm not much of an out door worker--So I bow to your superior knowledge

TRUEPRO 07-03-2012 05:41 PM

I am just relaying some of my findings from asking other tradesman. I never claimed to have knowledge in a way. Thanks for the sarcasm.

oh'mike 07-03-2012 05:51 PM

Sorry--I was not trying to be a jerk--I really do not do outside work often--no offense meant--

peakcelln 07-03-2012 06:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TRUEPRO (Post 957096)
Actually, i found travertine to be used for pool coping quite often. I have only ever used it for tile jobs but if some of the biggest and best pool companies are using it on 100k pools then apparently its good to go? fawkidk

Was that use in cold winter climates? The problem with Colorado is it's severe temp swings of 60 degrees. Winter sun will melt the snow and turn the deck temp to 50-60 or higher. Then the sun goes down and it drops to single digits and everything freezes.

I just wanted to see if anyone out there had real life cold weather experience with Travertine.

All the other natural stone i can get here , with this sun, is too hot to walk on in the summmertime.


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