Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Concrete, Stone & Masonry

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-14-2013, 01:42 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Houston Texas
Posts: 1,026
Share |
Default

Brick Mortar replacement


Is there an additive that will allow replaced brick mortar to remain some what flexible to absorb minor movement?

__________________
digitalplumber is just a name for use here, I am not a plumber!
digitalplumber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2013, 04:00 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: hilton head & atlanta
Posts: 2,992
Default

Brick Mortar replacement


mortar is somewhat flexible,,, if it weren't, every day when the sun hit the bricks & heats 'em, it compresses as brick expands,,, when it cools at nite, the reverse happens - bricks shrink / mortar expands ( despite what you're thinking, there's lots of air in mortar )

simple hi-skoul fizicks

__________________

if you hear it from a guy in the apron store, be VERY suspicious the mtl/method will work,,, when it time to build something together, they won't answer phones NOR help
itsreallyconc is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2013, 05:36 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: UK
Posts: 709
Default

Brick Mortar replacement


Quote:
Originally Posted by itsreallyconc View Post
mortar is somewhat flexible,,,
Doesn't that depend on how much cement is in the mix?
(richer mix = harder mortar an' all that?)
tony.g is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2013, 05:55 PM   #4
Civil Engineer
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Boston
Posts: 4,118
Default

Brick Mortar replacement


Lime mortar is very flexible. It has mostly been replaced with cement mortar because cement mortar is stronger (not always a good thing) and cures much more quickly. It is still possible to mix your own lime mortar, however using lime mortar on part of a building, and cement mortar on another part, could be problematic. I defer to a mason on that question.
Daniel Holzman is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Daniel Holzman For This Useful Post:
concretemasonry (11-14-2013)
Old 11-14-2013, 08:53 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Sarasota,Florida
Posts: 1,396
Default

Brick Mortar replacement


Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalplumber View Post
Is there an additive that will allow replaced brick mortar to remain some what flexible to absorb minor movement?
Sakrete has a type S sand,lime,and portland cement in a bag,it's what your looking for,just add water.
Canarywood1 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Canarywood1 For This Useful Post:
digitalplumber (11-14-2013)
Old 11-17-2013, 07:41 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 1,204
Default

Brick Mortar replacement


Type S is in no way suitable for tuckpointing most existing brick. Type N or softer is just fine, and a good mix would be:

Portland cement: 1 part
Lime: 2 parts
Masonry sand: 5-6 parts
__________________
Advice is free, Lessons begin at 75 bucks an hour.

Last edited by Tscarborough; 11-17-2013 at 07:43 PM.
Tscarborough is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Tscarborough For This Useful Post:
digitalplumber (11-17-2013)
Old 11-17-2013, 08:14 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Sarasota,Florida
Posts: 1,396
Default

Brick Mortar replacement


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tscarborough View Post
Type S is in no way suitable for tuckpointing most existing brick. Type N or softer is just fine, and a good mix would be:

Portland cement: 1 part
Lime: 2 parts
Masonry sand: 5-6 parts
Type N is fine if your exterior above grade or interior, otherwise Type S.
Canarywood1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2013, 08:22 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 1,204
Default

Brick Mortar replacement


Yes, well I didn't see where the OP said anything about below grade, but other than that or a very limited type of brick, Type N or softer will always be required, if not outright lime mortar. If you have any doubts or questions, I refer you to the Brick institute's Tek Notes 8b on the matter.

http://www.gobrick.com/Technical-Not...echnical-Notes
__________________
Advice is free, Lessons begin at 75 bucks an hour.
Tscarborough is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2013, 08:58 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Sarasota,Florida
Posts: 1,396
Default

Brick Mortar replacement


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tscarborough View Post
Yes, well I didn't see where the OP said anything about below grade, but other than that or a very limited type of brick, Type N or softer will always be required, if not outright lime mortar. If you have any doubts or questions, I refer you to the Brick institute's Tek Notes 8b on the matter.

http://www.gobrick.com/Technical-Not...echnical-Notes
I don't see where he said anything about above grade either,but each is an acceptable alternative either way.

http://www.cement.org/masonry/cc_mortar_types.asp
Canarywood1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2013, 09:10 PM   #10
Member
 
concretemasonry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota - Latitude 45.057 Longitude -93.074
Posts: 3,694
Default

Brick Mortar replacement


Strength is really not a criteria for mortar selection. There are more important factors such as workability, band and usability. Even the specifications for mortar state that the lowest strength possible to carry the loads. Adding to that is the factor that compressive strength has a small effect of the actual strength of a masonry wall.

It is one of contradictions to the falicy that more is better.

Dick
concretemasonry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2013, 09:21 PM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 1,204
Default

Brick Mortar replacement


What it is, Dick, is the confusion between mortar and concrete. They are not the same, even though they share some of the same ingredients. As you well know, they serve totally different purposes and have totally different requirements.

Concrete is a cast material that relies upon it's compressive strength in some applications (slabs for example) and it's tensile strength in others (precast girders for example). Mortar is used to hold masonry units that are not prefect in their dimensions apart with the primary goal of being softer than the units, with a good bond strength, flexural strength and a degree of breathable waterproofing. Softer is always better, the actual compressive strength of any structural masonry wall will almost always be far lower than what is considered to be a modern mortar.

__________________
Advice is free, Lessons begin at 75 bucks an hour.
Tscarborough is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Frost Free Hose Bibb replacement through brick siding Morgan R Plumbing 1 03-12-2012 05:19 PM
brick wall window -- replacement review amakarevic Building & Construction 3 01-24-2012 01:48 PM
Painting Brick - not the mortar Dan-D Painting 3 03-07-2010 12:00 AM
Potential foundation issues oklahomaguy32 General DIY Discussions 7 02-14-2010 03:12 PM
Mortar or thin set for brick pavers bdawson General DIY Discussions 0 04-27-2008 01:44 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.