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Old 05-03-2012, 03:13 PM   #1
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Brick/Mortar Repair


House built in 1930. There a a couple areas where mortar repair is needed, but this area is the one that drives me nuts. Right at the front entrance.

I thought about chiseling or grinding out the old mortar and repointing the area. It looks as if the bricks have separated more than what is consistent on the rest of the house, so I don't know if this is an option.

Should I rip this area out and completely redo?
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Old 05-03-2012, 03:36 PM   #2
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Brick/Mortar Repair


I don't think you want to deal with a foundation problem.

Grind out the mortar (do not chisel!!!) and tuckpoint the joints with an appropriate color mortar. The fresh mortar may appear dark initially and will lighten as it cures. If it seems to get too light, you can rub some soil on it and then rinse off later.

Dick

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Old 05-03-2012, 04:29 PM   #3
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Brick/Mortar Repair


Quote:
Originally Posted by concretemasonry View Post

Grind out the mortar (do not chisel!!!)
As a point of interest, why do you suggest grinding out the mortar rather than chiselling? Even with a small grinder, wouldn't it risk damaging the bricks if he was a bit too enthusiastic? I know chiselling is a pain but I wonder if it would be safer. Or is it that the brick is a veneer over a timber frame and might work loose by chiselling? Just wondering.
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Old 05-03-2012, 05:25 PM   #4
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Brick/Mortar Repair


That crack looks to have been repaired once already. If you don't deal with the underlying problem it will come back again.

Grinding is usually much quicker and cleaner than chiseling.
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Old 05-03-2012, 08:29 PM   #5
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Brick/Mortar Repair


Once you start banging a brick veneer with a hammer and chisel, you never know what will come loose, be cracked or show up later.

Dick
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