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Old 10-12-2011, 10:33 AM   #1
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Just gutted the bathroom and found the window frame from the old window looks like it was butchered with a sawzall. The vynl replacement window in old and I was going to replace. I don't see anything holding the window frame in other than the exterior trim.I'm wondering if this is ok ( doesn't look right)? can I install a new replacement window or should I reframe and use a new construction window?
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Old 10-12-2011, 11:42 AM   #2
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Yep, that's old school!
That's how all my windows were installed in my 1925 house.

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Old 10-12-2011, 06:57 PM   #3
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Clutchcargo is correct, there are a lot of old windows installed with fasteners through the brickmold and thats about it. They should also at least be shimmed, but in reality, its really the same concept as a nailing fin (which incidentally needs shimming as well).
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Old 10-12-2011, 07:16 PM   #4
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It doesn’t make it right.

Re-frame the opening to "new school" standards.
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Old 10-12-2011, 09:06 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by kwikfishron View Post
It doesn’t make it right.

Re-frame the opening to "new school" standards.
Uh, so what exactly is the major difference between shimming the buck frame, nailing through a piece attached to the outside of the frame (ie:brick mold), and then incorporating proper flashing detail? ... I see no difference. Same concept and equally effective done properly. I can also vouch for the fact that in all of the windows that we install (over 1200 per yr), I see leaking, mold, and overall shoddy workmanship far more often when working on newer homes with "superior, new school" nailing flange windows. Literally, it is next to never that I see signs of water infiltration in "old-school" window installation, and almost always that I see it in homes less than 20 yrs old.
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Old 10-12-2011, 09:21 PM   #6
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Uh, so what exactly is the major difference between shimming the buck frame, nailing through a piece attached to the outside of the frame (ie:brick mold), and then incorporating proper flashing detail? ... I see no difference. Same concept and equally effective done properly. I can also vouch for the fact that in all of the windows that we install (over 1200 per yr), I see leaking, mold, and overall shoddy workmanship far more often when working on newer homes with "superior, new school" nailing flange windows. Literally, it is next to never that I see signs of water infiltration in "old-school" window installation, and almost always that I see it in homes less than 20 yrs old.
It would be nice to have some nailing for the interior trim. Especially in a old house where the interior detail is likely more than 2 . Either way at least before there was some lath to bite into.
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Old 10-13-2011, 08:42 AM   #7
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Yeah there is no sign of water at all, I think I'll just add some lumber to strengthen it up and for nailers.I'm going to install a new replacement window also. Thanks all.

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