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Jj375 10-12-2011 09:33 AM

Window help
 
4 Attachment(s)
Just gutted the bathroom and found the window frame from the old window looks like it was butchered with a sawzall. The vynl replacement window in old and I was going to replace. I don't see anything holding the window frame in other than the exterior trim.I'm wondering if this is ok ( doesn't look right)? can I install a new replacement window or should I reframe and use a new construction window?

Clutchcargo 10-12-2011 10:42 AM

Yep, that's old school!
That's how all my windows were installed in my 1925 house.

HomeSealed 10-12-2011 05:57 PM

Clutchcargo is correct, there are a lot of old windows installed with fasteners through the brickmold and thats about it. They should also at least be shimmed, but in reality, its really the same concept as a nailing fin (which incidentally needs shimming as well).

kwikfishron 10-12-2011 06:16 PM

It doesn’t make it right.

Re-frame the opening to "new school" standards.

HomeSealed 10-12-2011 08:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kwikfishron (Post 747496)
It doesn’t make it right.

Re-frame the opening to "new school" standards.

Uh, so what exactly is the major difference between shimming the buck frame, nailing through a piece attached to the outside of the frame (ie:brick mold), and then incorporating proper flashing detail? ... I see no difference. Same concept and equally effective done properly. I can also vouch for the fact that in all of the windows that we install (over 1200 per yr), I see leaking, mold, and overall shoddy workmanship far more often when working on newer homes with "superior, new school" nailing flange windows. Literally, it is next to never that I see signs of water infiltration in "old-school" window installation, and almost always that I see it in homes less than 20 yrs old.

kwikfishron 10-12-2011 08:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HomeSealed (Post 747570)
Uh, so what exactly is the major difference between shimming the buck frame, nailing through a piece attached to the outside of the frame (ie:brick mold), and then incorporating proper flashing detail? ... I see no difference. Same concept and equally effective done properly. I can also vouch for the fact that in all of the windows that we install (over 1200 per yr), I see leaking, mold, and overall shoddy workmanship far more often when working on newer homes with "superior, new school" nailing flange windows. Literally, it is next to never that I see signs of water infiltration in "old-school" window installation, and almost always that I see it in homes less than 20 yrs old.

It would be nice to have some nailing for the interior trim. Especially in a old house where the interior detail is likely more than 2 . Either way at least before there was some lath to bite into.

Jj375 10-13-2011 07:42 AM

Yeah there is no sign of water at all, I think I'll just add some lumber to strengthen it up and for nailers.I'm going to install a new replacement window also. Thanks all.


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