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-   -   Replacing cracked caulking around window (http://www.diychatroom.com/f104/replacing-cracked-caulking-around-window-152021/)

ItsPowers 07-30-2012 03:41 PM

Replacing cracked caulking around window
 
1 Attachment(s)
Hey everyone,

So I just bought a new house and found a couple places where caulking has cracked around a window, in some places it's big enough that you can see daylight through. It looks like it would be an easy fix, but just wanted to ask how I should go about this:

Do I need to remove the old caulking first, or should I just try to put a little in to seal up the crack? Also, is there a particular type of caulk I should be using - silicon? all-purpose? etc.?

Thanks in advance for any help you can provide.

Attachment 54965

rossfingal 07-30-2012 03:46 PM

Try to remove as much of the old caulking that you can.
Use "OSI" Quad or "NPT" Solar Seal.
RF

joecaption 07-30-2012 04:45 PM

No idea of what that's suppost to be a picture of.
New caulking will not stick to old, so the old has to go.
Someone used way to much caulking when caulking that window. You only need enough to fill the gap not all over the trin and the window.
Do not use silicon, it can not be painted.
I use Alex 230, it's water clean up, 50 year warrenty, paintable.
I just hate working with Quad, it stick great but it's a total mess to clean up on the trim and your hands while using it.

kwikfishron 07-30-2012 05:58 PM

I know of no other caulking that sticks (and stays stuck) better than a polyurethane based caulk (Quad or Vulkem) especially against masonry.

There is defiantly a learning curve to using the stuff without making a mess of things. A rag and a jug of thinner at your side is mandatory.

I hate working with the stuff. Between the caulking and the thinner you end up smelling like you bathed in diesel fuel by the end of the day.

I still use it regardless of it being user friendly or not because I believe it will out preform anything DAP has to offer.

What does a 50 year warranty mean anyway???

Save the empty tubes and the receipt. Here's the warranty for 230 from DAP.

50-Year Satisfaction Guarantee:
If not satisfied with product performance during guarantee period, return used container and sales receipt to
DAP Products Inc., Technical Customer Service, 2400 Boston St., Ste. 200, Baltimore, MD, 21224 for sales price refund. DAP is not liable for incidental or consequential damages.

Maintenance 6 08-03-2012 10:03 AM

Yeah! I know I put those empty caulk tubes and the reciept in my safe deposit box so that when I'm a hundred years old I can return them for my full refund. :laughing:

HomeSealed 08-03-2012 10:36 PM

Another vote for quad, vulkem, and/or solar seal. They are actually very easy to work with if you work with them regularly, but the key is that you need to be able to lay a nice bead without tooling. If you are going to need to tool it, you may be better off with some of that cheaper stuff.

Windows on Wash 08-04-2012 08:36 AM

Quad is sort of the industry standard now and day.

Be aware that in a confined space, you are going to need some circulation and fresh air.

bugmenot 08-08-2012 05:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kwikfishron (Post 977844)
What does a 50 year warranty mean anyway???

Save the empty tubes and the receipt. Here's the warranty for 230 from DAP.

50-Year Satisfaction Guarantee:
If not satisfied with product performance during guarantee period, return used container and sales receipt to
DAP Products Inc., Technical Customer Service, 2400 Boston St., Ste. 200, Baltimore, MD, 21224 for sales price refund. DAP is not liable for incidental or consequential damages.

Are you sure new tubes say that? I have a tube of DAP polyurethane flashing sealant that I bought a few days ago, and it says return within 1 year if not satisfied. No mention of 50 years besides the "50 year guarantee" text on the front. Anyway, if this stuff did last for 50 years, I wouldn't be replacing the peeled away caulking with 47 years of durability supposedly remaining.:laughing: Hoping that whoever did the flashing was just sloppy.

It also says xylene or toluene are recommended for cleanup, as opposed to paint thinner/mineral spirits. Seems to depend on the product, not necessarily the main advertised ingredient (different proportions etc.); be sure to read the label before you go getting any on yourself. best to wear gloves.


That damaged caulking on the window looks to be inside. Do the outside with something polyurethane-based (several recommendations above), and the inside with acrylic. It's not like the inside part will get wet, and you don't have to worry about messy stuff that is difficult to clean up and smells horrible. Acrylic will still resist moisture, it's just not as durable, which is a non-issue indoors/away from water.

kwikfishron 08-08-2012 05:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bugmenot (Post 984370)
Are you sure new tubes say that?

Never read the tube (don't use it), I got that off the TB http://www.dap.com/docs/tech/00010057101.pdf Bottom of the page.


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