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-   -   Refilling Argon thermal pane windows (http://www.diychatroom.com/f104/refilling-argon-thermal-pane-windows-100077/)

Chiurato 03-30-2011 04:15 PM

Refilling Argon thermal pane windows
 
I have double pane thermal doors (sliding glass) I am going to be repairing this summer. Rot has started on the lower half and I'm thinking of repairing them (with pressure treated lumber) and then injecting argon gas in between the panes to keep the insulation value (after of course sealing all the edges with silicon). The argon is easily available from welding supplies stores or even on-line for wine preservation. The atomic mass of argon is 39.95 whereas the atomic mass of air is 28.97 meaning argon is heavier than air (of course factors such as humidity should affect this). So theoretically I should be able to drill two small holes (one to inject argon and one to release pressure) from the top of the repaired door and "recharge" the window after repair.

I know, just replace the sliding glass door. Well, I have thirteen of them. Not all are bad and if I do one, I will have to do them all or they won't match. A small fortune.

Does this sound feasible/workable?

Ron6519 03-30-2011 05:22 PM

You'll need to rethink the pressure treated wood for the doors. Too wet for this application. Use another rot resistant species.
Ron

kwikfishron 03-30-2011 05:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chiurato (Post 620145)
injecting argon gas in between the panes to keep the insulation value (after of course sealing all the edges with silicon).

So theoretically I should be able to drill two small holes (one to inject argon and one to release pressure) from the top of the repaired door and "recharge" the window after repair.

Does this sound feasible/workable?

:eek: My answer is NO.

Chiurato 03-30-2011 09:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kwikfishron (Post 620201)
:eek: My answer is NO.

Why? Is the argon used for welding unsuitable? Leak problems? Can you give me some input as to your answer? Not trying to be flip, just interested in the logic as to why this wouldn't work. Thanks.

fabrk8r 03-31-2011 08:16 AM

You won't get all the air out by just trying to displace it with Argon. You would have to pull a vacuum on the space between the panes of glass first like they did at the factory. If you do this you will also find out how hard it is to make a perfect seal using wood.

kwikfishron 03-31-2011 08:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fabrk8r (Post 620493)
You won't get all the air out by just trying to displace it with Argon. You would have to pull a vacuum on the space between the panes of glass first like they did at the factory. If you do this you will also find out how hard it is to make a perfect seal using wood.

Agreed.:thumbsup:


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