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Old 10-09-2013, 03:09 PM   #1
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new construction window


Hi,

When you install a flanged new construction window do the brick layers simply install the brick around the flange or does the brick usually cover the nailing flange leaving just an air space? Reason I am asking is what do you do if you need to replace a window that is flanged in a brick sided house? Do you replace it with a window that does not utilize a nailing flange and do you simple use a brick mould to cover the air space between the sheathing and brick?

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Old 10-09-2013, 07:54 PM   #2
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The masonry usually overlaps the nailing flange with an air space between and the gap is covered with a wood moulding. To remove, the old window must be cut apart. The new window is installed without flanges. Lacking flanges is tricky because running screws sideways into the opening jambs can VERY easily pinch or stretch the frame causing the window to stick or leak air along the side tracks. Seems dumb but that's the way it's most often done.

Commercial windows are available with a "panning system" which is essentially an outer casing frame that is screwed to the wall and the window unit "floats" inside the casing. I have not seen this for residential windows.

Rick

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Old 10-09-2013, 09:27 PM   #3
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i think i would build buck frames
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Old 10-10-2013, 08:00 AM   #4
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i think i would build buck frames
a window buck is to extend the frame out past the opening.
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Old 10-10-2013, 08:00 AM   #5
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The masonry usually overlaps the nailing flange with an air space between and the gap is covered with a wood moulding. To remove, the old window must be cut apart. The new window is installed without flanges. Lacking flanges is tricky because running screws sideways into the opening jambs can VERY easily pinch or stretch the frame causing the window to stick or leak air along the side tracks. Seems dumb but that's the way it's most often done.

Commercial windows are available with a "panning system" which is essentially an outer casing frame that is screwed to the wall and the window unit "floats" inside the casing. I have not seen this for residential windows.

Rick
So, basically just replacement windows? Those don't have nailing flanges.
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Old 10-10-2013, 01:46 PM   #6
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So, basically just replacement windows? Those don't have nailing flanges.
You can order window frames with or without flanges (or fins). Having flanges is the norm because most windows are sold for new installation work not for retrofit. Some brands are only available with flanges but they have a score line where the fins can be broken off. If at all possible, I recommend installation using the flanges.

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Old 10-10-2013, 03:54 PM   #7
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You can order window frames with or without flanges (or fins). Having flanges is the norm because most windows are sold for new installation work not for retrofit. Some brands are only available with flanges but they have a score line where the fins can be broken off. If at all possible, I recommend installation using the flanges.

Rick
But as I said its a masonry (brick) opening. How am I supposed to utilize nailing flanges?
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Old 10-10-2013, 07:53 PM   #8
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build a frame the exact size of the opening. i used 1x PT. use tapcons to secure it in the hole. sp/caulk as needed. nail the flanges to the frame.

been there, done that. block wall foundation.
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Old 10-11-2013, 08:51 AM   #9
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build a frame the exact size of the opening. i used 1x PT. use tapcons to secure it in the hole. sp/caulk as needed. nail the flanges to the frame.

been there, done that. block wall foundation.
How do you figure the 3/4" edges is enough surface for the nailing flanges to be fastened to?
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Old 10-11-2013, 03:52 PM   #10
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Tigerfan, I assume that this opening is already in existence and this is not just a conceptual question? If so, take off the exterior trim/brickmold (if there is any) and see what you have.
If the RO is smaller than the opening in the masonry to allow removal and install of finned units, then that is the way to go. OTOH, if the masonry laps over where the fin sits then your best bet is simply to use a finless window. I would not build a buck frame and downsize it under most circumstances. If you were going to do that you may as well just do a pocket install unless there is some circumstance that would preclude that.
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Old 10-12-2013, 07:36 AM   #11
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i did it my way, and it worked out very well. block wall. perhaps that makes a difference ?
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Old 10-12-2013, 11:58 AM   #12
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+1

Pull the brickmold and see what you got.

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