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-   -   which is more reliable ... (http://www.diychatroom.com/f104/more-reliable-141271/)

Fix'n it 04-23-2012 09:05 PM

which is more reliable ...
 
... and which is the least expensive ?

sliders or casements ?

i cannot decide what to get. maybe this will break the deadlock.

i used to have casements. i am sure they were builders grade (as everything else was. new construction). i liked them. but the finish on the wood was flaking and burning from the sun. and the crank mechanism was becoming problematic on 2 windows.

i'm talking vinyl.

joecaption 04-23-2012 09:16 PM

I dislike both of them but a slider has less parts to mess up and leak.

HomeSealed 04-23-2012 10:04 PM

There are pros and cons to each. Any compression-seal configuration (casement, awning, etc) will have better performance ratings, although I've experienced fewer service issues with sliders and double hungs.

Windows on Wash 04-23-2012 11:12 PM

:thumbsup:
Quote:

Originally Posted by HomeSealed (Post 905972)
There are pros and cons to each. Any compression-seal configuration (casement, awning, etc) will have better performance ratings, although I've experienced fewer service issues with sliders and double hungs.

+1

Going to service a casement tomorrow AM.

firehawkmph 04-24-2012 06:46 PM

I happen to like casements. When I was building houses, including my own, I used quite a few over the years. All Andersens. The sash is completely wrapped in vinyl so no problem with rot. They use Truth hardware. Mine have been in for 20 years now with no problems. They definitely seal up better than sliders or double hungs. Whatever you get, buy a quality window so you aren't redoing the job a few years from now.
Mike Hawkins:)

Fix'n it 04-24-2012 08:58 PM

so, what is the problem with casements ? the crank mechanism i bet ?

Windows on Wash 04-24-2012 09:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fix'n it (Post 906785)
so, what is the problem with casements ? the crank mechanism i bet ?

The operator and the fact that when the window is open, it requires more structure and engineering to support that weight properly as compared to a sliding window sitting in a track.

HomeSealed 04-24-2012 10:04 PM

Yep ^... And on some models that are not adjustable, those sashes sag after several years and cause problems with operation. I just looked at some 12 yr old Pellas that had several sash rails rotted and falling off, and the rest of them were sagging so bad that the homeowners actually broke the operator by having to crank so hard to get them open.

Windows on Wash 04-26-2012 10:46 AM

I am starting to sag after 12 years so that seems about normal... :laughing:

Fix'n it 05-05-2012 09:31 AM

i have been driving around and looking at houses windows. i hardly ever see sliders.
probably :
49.4% casements
49.4% DH's
.2%(if that) sliders.

i am leaning sliders. but 1 thing i don't like about them, is that the screen is always on the outside = more likely to get damaged.
and, because the pains are offset, the window looks uneven.

HomeSealed 05-07-2012 09:03 AM

Those issues are the exact same as double-hungs... The sashes won't look "off-set" when the screen is on.
I see far more damaged casement screens (being on the interior they are wrecked by kids and pets) than I do dh or sliders on the exterior.
The size of your opening (ie: is it taller or wider) should play a role in the configuration that you choose. If you have a wider opening, sliders are more economical than twin casements. If taller, then dh's or casements are a good choice.

oberon 05-07-2012 04:17 PM

Personal opinion - I don't like casements in a heating climate. In any climate I don't like the interior screen and I don't like the crank.

With a couple of specific provisions I do like sliders (vertical or horizontal) in a heating climate.

Provisions (in no particular order):
1 - TIGHT-ly sealed
2 - when possible include a storm window
3 - Don't waste your money on junk - there are lots of sliders out there that are junk - in part because they can be made both simple and cheap.
4 - GOOD weather stripping resulting in TIGHT-ly sealed

Best thing about a casement - can be sealed tight. This is a VERY good thing.

Worst thing about a casement - everything else other than they seal tightly, but especially how they "stick-out" from the exterior of the structure exposing the sash and glass package to the worst possible weather extremes.

Best things about a slider (talking horzontal here) - the sash / glass package isn't sticking out past the plane of the exterior wall - and they don't have an interior screen and a crank.

Worst thing about a slider - they can be made simple and cheap thus consigning them to the "simple and cheap" category of building products (in most cases - but not all - there are some very good sliders out there and oh-boy can they be expensive).

Best window design on the market when considering overall performance - tilt/turn or dual action.

:whistling2:

Fix'n it 05-07-2012 09:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HomeSealed (Post 916426)
Those issues are the exact same as double-hungs... The sashes won't look "off-set" when the screen is on.

I see far more damaged casement screens (being on the interior they are wrecked by kids and pets) than I do dh or sliders on the exterior.

The size of your opening (ie: is it taller or wider) should play a role in the configuration that you choose. If you have a wider opening, sliders are more economical than twin casements. If taller, then dh's or casements are a good choice.

ok, sounds good. i can live with that.

good point. one of my cats did to a number on my old screens.

sizes:huh: yeah. well, there are going to be a few different sizes. but i will keep the height the same, i'm thinking 3'6". except for, perhaps, the window over the kitchen sink. may have to make that one a little shorter. i want the top of all the windows the same height all around the house.
many/most, i am thinking around 3 1/2'-4' wide.

the window in the laundry room will have to be a casement. as the room/wall is narrow. and a thin slider looks silly.

Fix'n it 05-07-2012 09:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oberon (Post 916652)
Personal opinion - I don't like casements in a heating climate. In any climate I don't like the interior screen and I don't like the crank.

With a couple of specific provisions I do like sliders (vertical or horizontal) in a heating climate.

Provisions (in no particular order):
1 - TIGHT-ly sealed
2 - when possible include a storm window
3 - Don't waste your money on junk - there are lots of sliders out there that are junk - in part because they can be made both simple and cheap.
4 - GOOD weather stripping resulting in TIGHT-ly sealed

Best thing about a casement - can be sealed tight. This is a VERY good thing.

Worst thing about a casement - everything else other than they seal tightly, but especially how they "stick-out" from the exterior of the structure exposing the sash and glass package to the worst possible weather extremes.

Best things about a slider (talking horzontal here) - the sash / glass package isn't sticking out past the plane of the exterior wall - and they don't have an interior screen and a crank.

Worst thing about a slider - they can be made simple and cheap thus consigning them to the "simple and cheap" category of building products (in most cases - but not all - there are some very good sliders out there and oh-boy can they be expensive).

Best window design on the market when considering overall performance - tilt/turn or dual action.

good points. except for the "worst possible weather extremes" thing. when that happens, ya just close em. and i didn't mind my old casements sticking out past the building.

as far as price goes. $500 a window isn't going to happen. but i think i can do better than the $140 window at menards.

what are tilt/turn & dual action, and how are they priced ?

Fix'n it 05-07-2012 09:29 PM

ok, now. what is it about sliders that makes them seal not as good as casements ? i know that the seal compression is very good on casements.
but with todays technology, i would think that there is a seal for sliders that would seal just as well.

i am still trying to find a dealer of GOOD windows somewhere around me. so i can see/touch them
(but in one of the largest markets in the world, chicago area. i am having a hard time finding them. sure, i can drive an hour+ away, but that is not practical ). but by looking at the ones at HD and menards. it looks like the seal around the glass, and the little fizzy seals, are the weak points.


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