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Old 04-07-2007, 12:36 PM   #1
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Insulating Aluminum Window Frames


I have dual pane aluminum windows. The frames are very cold in the winter when I'm near them, and condensation builds up from time to time, especially in the bathroom, despite the use of the power ventaltion. Is there anything I can do other than sealing the draft with silicone that can minumize the conductivity of heat? I was courious if there is any durable paint barrier or veneer products out there that can coat or cover the aluminum that will reduce the heat loss and avoid the condensation.

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Old 04-07-2007, 02:31 PM   #2
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Insulating Aluminum Window Frames


I don't think there is a painting product that will help solve the problem.

As far as veneer, wood is always a better insulator than aluminum, however, not sure a veneer is viable for this situation.

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Old 04-11-2007, 11:15 AM   #3
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Insulating Aluminum Window Frames


I also have a case of Great Stuff expandable foam. I noticed the aluminum window frames have hollow chambers and cavities, and I wonder if they would better if filled with the expandable foam to deaden noise vibration and to minimize draft.

Please comment if you have any insight on this process.
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Old 04-11-2007, 01:45 PM   #4
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Insulating Aluminum Window Frames


The aluminum frames themselves are not structurally designed to withstand the pressure caused by expanding foam. Plus, it would void the warranty on your windows.

Your best bet is to buy some shrink film for the windows during the winter. More expensive windows already have existing hard foam to prevent heat loss.

http://www.frostking.com/windowweather.php
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Old 04-11-2007, 06:27 PM   #5
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Insulating Aluminum Window Frames


Quote:
Originally Posted by waynerlee View Post
I also have a case of Great Stuff expandable foam. I noticed the aluminum window frames have hollow chambers and cavities, and I wonder if they would better if filled with the expandable foam to deaden noise vibration and to minimize draft.

Please comment if you have any insight on this process.
Yes, this can work, However, make sure that it is not the rigid expanding foam. As stated, it will cause warpage in the flexible vinyl window frame and void warranties.

Use the foam that is soft-rated. It won't expand and warp frames. We have used it, I can't recall the name brand or what exactly the label says....But it's out there being sold.....
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Old 04-11-2007, 07:21 PM   #6
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Insulating Aluminum Window Frames


From what I've seen, one of the biggest issues with windows today is the cheap weatherstripping used, which is typically the flimsy furry tape.
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Old 04-12-2007, 10:31 AM   #7
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Insulating Aluminum Window Frames


I had a simular problem with a basement glass block window. The cold glass caused the air to drop down causing a draft.
What I did to solve this was to build a wood frame out of 1 x 3's. I would rout out the four pieces of the frame first, about 5/8 inch from the edge with a router bit sized to accomodate spline material. Then I would assemble the frame using four 1/2 inch wide corner angle brackets. Then attach my clear plastic sheeting with spline material. After this was done, then I attached a strip of adhesive foam, about 3/8 inch wide to the perimeter of the frame. Then this was attached to the window frame using screws.
In the Spring, its removed and put away untill the next season.

Now in your case, you may need to build a frame that will be permently attached to the inside area of the window, so that your new assembly can be attached to it and removed when needed.

If you have a router and tablesaw with some hand tools, you can build these yourself and save plenty or hireing a handyman to make them.

I did the same thing in my bathroom which has a skylite and I had to build a separate frame around the perimiter of the ceiling area surrounding the skylite. Then I built the new window as described above to fit it.

Last edited by rjordan392; 04-12-2007 at 10:36 AM.
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Old 04-13-2007, 06:14 PM   #8
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Insulating Aluminum Window Frames


Is replacing the windows an option?
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Old 04-20-2007, 12:35 PM   #9
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Insulating Aluminum Window Frames


Yes replacing the windows is an option. A replacement window will go over your existing frame.
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Old 04-20-2007, 05:54 PM   #10
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Actually, replacement windows go 'into' your existing window frames.
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Old 01-15-2010, 08:13 AM   #11
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Insulating Aluminum Window Frames


Hi

I had the same problem with aluminum frames with almost all windows in my condo. I found a
quick fix. For the window glass you can use the shrink film (works very well), but bigest problems are the aluminum frames (they are "sweating") when the weather is very cold.
You can use foam tape (self adhesive) to insulate the aluminum frames. They can in different sizes and thickness. Easy to apply. I bought mine in Home Depot http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/s...k=P_PartNumber

it's called Closed-Cell Foam Tape Self Adhesive Weatherstripping
from TAGO Canada
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Old 01-15-2010, 02:22 PM   #12
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Insulating Aluminum Window Frames


What sasocek said. Insulate using foam tape on the Al frame. Since you have double pane so you don't really need the film for your windows.
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Old 02-13-2010, 11:49 AM   #13
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Insulating Aluminum Window Frames


When I tried installing similar foam tape, the aluminum sliding glass door, and the sliding window, wouldn't close. It seems if I were to use something like this, it would require a pretty thin strip of this.

Does anyone know of any possibilities of a thin foam strip available?

Additionally, my windows seem to leak from all around - I'm guessing from the fur strip being old. What else can I do? Maybe caulk around the edges of the stationary windows? What should I do on the sliding window?

I've been looking around for fur stripped to try to seal the part where the window and door slides, but I'm pretty unsuccessful in my Google searches...
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Old 02-13-2010, 01:26 PM   #14
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Insulating Aluminum Window Frames


I have aluminum windows in my 20 year old home. When I first moved in we were using unvented gas fireplace and the moisture was unreal. I run the celing fans and set the central heat on constant fan, it was basically the same.
Later I found out that my wife was not using the range vent while cooking because she didn't in the home we moved from.
We figured this home was much tighter then our older home so she started using the range vent.
Ninety percent of the moisture stopped in our 3,400 sq.ft. home.
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Old 02-13-2010, 07:05 PM   #15
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Insulating Aluminum Window Frames


Quote:
Originally Posted by Giles View Post
I have aluminum windows in my 20 year old home. When I first moved in we were using unvented gas fireplace and the moisture was unreal. I run the celing fans and set the central heat on constant fan, it was basically the same.
Later I found out that my wife was not using the range vent while cooking because she didn't in the home we moved from.
We figured this home was much tighter then our older home so she started using the range vent.
Ninety percent of the moisture stopped in our 3,400 sq.ft. home.
The gas fireplace probably wouldn't be the reason for the moisture as it pulls moisture from the atmosphere, unlike propane.

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