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Old 02-16-2012, 11:43 AM   #1
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Installing Pocket Door with room for switch


I am remodeling MB walk-in closet and I want a converging pocket door entrance. The wall is approx. 6.5 feet long. I need to be able to put an electrical box near the door. The wall is not constructed yet, so I can construct it wider than 2 x 4 if necessary to accomodate the depth of an electrical box.

Has anyone here built a pocket door Without using a kit?

I understand that there are certain parts I will need to purchase, but I'm just looking for a little help on doing the framing without a kit.

Thanks,
Greg

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Old 02-16-2012, 12:48 PM   #2
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Installing Pocket Door with room for switch


What's converging? 2 doors coming together? Not sure about those.
Get a kit. I've never seen anybody try to build one.
In a normal pocket door,
if you want a 2'-8" door, your r/o needs to be 5'-6".
You'll probably have to go with a 2'-6" door to have a switch box on the same wall.

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Last edited by titanoman; 02-16-2012 at 01:06 PM.
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Old 02-16-2012, 02:19 PM   #3
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Installing Pocket Door with room for switch


A converging pocket door is a pocket door on each side of the opening, kind of like french doors.
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Old 03-30-2012, 11:25 PM   #4
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Installing Pocket Door with room for switch


I just completed something similar. I had 2 beautiful cherry wood louvered doors which were removed from the laundry room. I wanted to reuse them when I remodelled the master bathroom. The louvers would help with ventilation. The doors were only 15 inches wide, so converging pocket doors was the best option. As you discover with converging pocket doors, it is tough to find a good place to put the wall switch next to the door. The other thing is I'm lazy and wanted to avoid ripping 2 by stock. I ordered all my parts from Johnsons Hardware. Bing "Pocket Door", they'll be on the first page. They also have very good drawings to help with installation.

First the rough opening is twice the door opening. There is a stud and jack stud at each end of the rough opening, so subtract 6" (4 x 1.5") from the available width to get the maximum rough opening. So if you have 6' 6" - 6" would be 6' rough opening and divide by 2 for a 3' door opening. Since you want a converging door divide by 2, so each door is 18" wide.

Order a 6 foot track, that way you dont need a convergence kit. Get 4 wheels for the doors

Next you need to figure out how wide the pocket should be and were to put the pocket stud. In the back of the pocket there is a 3/8" door stop. A pocket door when open should be flat across the door frame. Some people like a slight recess. If you like a slight recess reduce the width of the door by 1/8 to 1/4 inch. The door frame will probably use 3/8 to 1/2" (true) stock. Therefore, the distance between the jack stud and outside of pocket stud is 18 + 3/8 - 1/2 = 17 7/8". That is the hard part.

Now comes the trick with the thickness of the wall. According to Johnson's the minimum size of the pocket opening is 3/8 inch more than the thickness of the door. If the door is 1 1/8 inch the opening needs to be 1 1/2 inch (1 1/8 + 3/8). It is possible to find electrical boxes which fit into a 3 inch stud wall and can hold 1 switch. So on the outside of the pocket use 3 inch studs. On the inside use studs turned on the side. A quick calculation 2 1/2 (stud) + 1 1/2 (pocket) + 1 1/2 (sideway stud) = 5 1/2 inches. Therefore, use 2 x 6 for the wall, jack stud and header. If your door is 1 3/8 use 5/4 stock for the inside. Johnson has steel re-enforced split studs you could use as well, but they cost $$. Since the studs are on the inside there is not much chance of accidental screwing through the stud. Be careful installing drywall. Use short screws.
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Old 03-30-2012, 11:40 PM   #5
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Installing Pocket Door with room for switch


Quote:
Originally Posted by goosebarry View Post
I just completed something similar. I had 2 beautiful cherry wood louvered doors which were removed from the laundry room. I wanted to reuse them when I remodelled the master bathroom. The louvers would help with ventilation. The doors were only 15 inches wide, so converging pocket doors was the best option. As you discover with converging pocket doors, it is tough to find a good place to put the wall switch next to the door. The other thing is I'm lazy and wanted to avoid ripping 2 by stock. I ordered all my parts from Johnsons Hardware. Bing "Pocket Door", they'll be on the first page. They also have very good drawings to help with installation.

First the rough opening is twice the door opening. There is a stud and jack stud at each end of the rough opening, so subtract 6" (4 x 1.5") from the available width to get the maximum rough opening. So if you have 6' 6" - 6" would be 6' rough opening and divide by 2 for a 3' door opening. Since you want a converging door divide by 2, so each door is 18" wide.

Order a 6 foot track, that way you dont need a convergence kit. Get 4 wheels for the doors

Next you need to figure out how wide the pocket should be and were to put the pocket stud. In the back of the pocket there is a 3/8" door stop. A pocket door when open should be flat across the door frame. Some people like a slight recess. If you like a slight recess reduce the width of the door by 1/8 to 1/4 inch. The door frame will probably use 3/8 to 1/2" (true) stock. Therefore, the distance between the jack stud and outside of pocket stud is 18 + 3/8 - 1/2 = 17 7/8". That is the hard part.

Now comes the trick with the thickness of the wall. According to Johnson's the minimum size of the pocket opening is 3/8 inch more than the thickness of the door. If the door is 1 1/8 inch the opening needs to be 1 1/2 inch (1 1/8 + 3/8). It is possible to find electrical boxes which fit into a 3 inch stud wall and can hold 1 switch. So on the outside of the pocket use 3 inch studs. On the inside use studs turned on the side. A quick calculation 2 1/2 (stud) + 1 1/2 (pocket) + 1 1/2 (sideway stud) = 5 1/2 inches. Therefore, use 2 x 6 for the wall, jack stud and header. If your door is 1 3/8 use 5/4 stock for the inside. Johnson has steel re-enforced split studs you could use as well, but they cost $$. Since the studs are on the inside there is not much chance of accidental screwing through the stud. Be careful installing drywall. Use short screws.
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