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-   -   How do replace rotted wood in window frame? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f104/how-do-replace-rotted-wood-window-frame-110520/)

Sherm 07-12-2011 01:53 PM

How do replace rotted wood in window frame?
 
3 Attachment(s)
We have a psuedo-French door (only 1 of the "double-looking" doors opens) with a window above it. Some of the wood at the base of the window above the door is rotted. The wood seems loose as if I could just pull the piece out, but it also dovetails to the adjoining piece, and something tells me you can't buy pre-dovetailed wood. And no, I don't have a dovetail jig. Can this be replaced or repaired, then repainted?

Thank you in advance for your help,
John

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AGWhitehouse 07-12-2011 02:36 PM

Is there a stop (removable piece) on the interior side of glass?

If so, my approach would be to remove the stop, remove the glass, and then cut off the exterior "stop". From the looks of the picture the rotting is only happening in the stop location. Once cut off you should be left with a flat piece of wood. Go to the store and buy a piece of 1/2" minimum thickness wood (1/2" 1/4 round is ideal). cut to length and nail onto the window sill at the exterior with the vertical leg against where the glass will be. Re-install the glass and interior stop. Prime the exterior, paint the exterior and then fill the void between the new stop and the glass with caulk or glazing compound.

That's my approach based on what I see.....

p.s. Looks like you need to paint the balance of the frame before it all begins to rot.

Sherm 07-12-2011 08:29 PM

Thanks for your reply Mr. Whitehouse!

Quote:

Originally Posted by AGWhitehouse (Post 684768)
Is there a stop (removable piece) on the interior side of glass? If so, my approach would be to remove the stop, remove the glass, and then cut off the exterior "stop".

I'm not sure if there's a stop - I don't see a removable piece ... I just checked and I don't see how it's removable at all :(. With the exception of the rot, the "stop" on the instide looks just like the one on the outside ...


Quote:

Originally Posted by AGWhitehouse (Post 684768)
From the looks of the picture the rotting is only happening in the stop location. Once cut off you should be left with a flat piece of wood. Go to the store and buy a piece of 1/2" minimum thickness wood (1/2" 1/4 round is ideal). cut to length and nail onto the window sill at the exterior with the vertical leg against where the glass will be. Re-install the glass and interior stop. Prime the exterior, paint the exterior and then fill the void between the new stop and the glass with caulk or glazing compound.

Do you think this can be done with the glass still in place?


Quote:

Originally Posted by AGWhitehouse (Post 684768)
p.s. Looks like you need to paint the balance of the frame before it all begins to rot.

Yeah, I was actually stripping the rest of the frame in preparation for the paint when I realized how bad the window, or transom or whatever, was.

Thanks again much for taking the time to reply!

V/r,
John

oh'mike 07-12-2011 08:47 PM

Those joints you see are 'finger joints'----the board is glued up from smaller pieces of wood--

If the window has no removable stop inside---you are going to have to remove the outside stop in place.

It's all milled out of one board so you will need to neatly saw the stop away from the sill.

The best tool for that job is a Multi-tool or a Bosch Fine Cut saw.

Harbor Freight makes a dandy Multi-tool and the blades are 1/2 the price of the fancy brands.

I would use AZEK PVC trims to replace the stop molding--or mill some with a router.

What tools do you have? ---Mike---

Sherm 07-12-2011 08:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 685016)
Those joints you see are 'finger joints'----the board is glued up from smaller pieces of wood--

If the window has no removable stop inside---you are going to have to remove the outside stop in place.

It's all milled out of one board so you will need to neatly saw the stop away from the sill.

The best tool for that job is a Multi-tool or a Bosch Fine Cut saw.

Harbor Freight makes a dandy Multi-tool and the blades are 1/2 the price of the fancy brands.

I would use AZEK PVC trims to replace the stop molding--or mill some with a router.

What tools do you have? ---Mike---

Hey Mike! Thanks so much for your response! I have many tools, but mostly for automotive work ... so I don't think I've gotten around to a Multi-tool or Bosch Fine Cut saw yet. Well, no better time than the present if I need one. However, it doesn't seem to be "all milled out of one board", which should be good news - right? I should be able to remove the "stop-molding" without a fine cut saw ... I think what's there is simply glued in place. Guess I won't know till I go to remove it. Definitely appreciate you letting me know about "AZEK PVC trims to replace the stop molding"!!!

Thanks again very much!!!

Best,
John

Sherm 07-13-2011 01:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AGWhitehouse (Post 684768)
... Go to the store and buy a piece of 1/2" minimum thickness wood (1/2" 1/4 round is ideal). cut to length and nail onto the window sill at the exterior with the vertical leg against where the glass will be.

So, I think I'm going to use the AZEC PVC trim; I think that makes the most sense. Now, that would be glued into place - correct?

Quote:

Originally Posted by AGWhitehouse (Post 684768)
Prime the exterior, paint the exterior and then fill the void between the new stop and the glass with caulk or glazing compound.

Since I won't be able to remove the glass, I should apply caulk or glazing before "glueing" (?) the trim (or "stop") into place, or would it be carefully nailed ... or how about screwed ... into place. Thoughts?

AGWhitehouse 07-13-2011 01:28 PM

PVC trim is fine, with such a thin piece you may want to pre-drill all fastener holes to prevent potential cracking. It's pretty maleable stuff, but better safe than sorry.

you can glue and nail, or glue and screw. Screwing is probably easiest as it reduces the chance of breaking your window with a swinging hammer. I would caulk it once fully installed and prior to painting. Make sure it is paintable exterior grade caulking.

Sherm 07-13-2011 02:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AGWhitehouse (Post 685403)
PVC trim is fine, with such a thin piece you may want to pre-drill all fastener holes to prevent potential cracking. It's pretty maleable stuff, but better safe than sorry.

you can glue and nail, or glue and screw. Screwing is probably easiest as it reduces the chance of breaking your window with a swinging hammer. I would caulk it once fully installed and prior to painting. Make sure it is paintable exterior grade caulking.

Thanks again Mr. Whitehouse! This is actually starting to seem doable!

Best,
John


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