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Old 02-22-2012, 01:25 PM   #16
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Garage Door Unbalanced - Adding Larger or Additional Spring?


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Originally Posted by super20g View Post
Thank you for a reply with at least a little usable content.

This isn't my first time adjusting or replacing torsion springs.

I was just looking for someone with knowledge who could assist with correctly sizing a spring or springs to this application. That I have not done before.
Well, you need to know the spring constants [k] and how much additional force you need.
Gimme' some numbers, including pulley diameters.
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Old 02-22-2012, 01:33 PM   #17
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Garage Door Unbalanced - Adding Larger or Additional Spring?


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You have anger management issues. I'd help you with that but I have more than a few of my own.
Appologies for the disruption. It just does little good to fill up a thread with back and forth offtopic banter. I suppose I come from different forum etiquette. I am appreciative of anyone taking time to help others. I try to play nice!

Last edited by super20g; 02-22-2012 at 02:11 PM.
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Old 02-22-2012, 01:56 PM   #18
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Garage Door Unbalanced - Adding Larger or Additional Spring?


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I hate to admit it, but in this case, possibly yes. And that's also why I couldn't have a Red Ryder BB gun.

The dangers are the speed of uncoiling and the force of uncoiling and of course the potential energy stored in the spring. The weight of the door along with some calculation will tell you the lb-ft of torque the spring is exerting.

If you can make some kind of brake assembly you may be able to let the energy out slowly (enormous energy let out slowly = low power). If your brake assembly fails it can then become a flying object.

If the spring is not totally uncoiled with the door all the way up this is another problem because it still has potential energy.

In any case, borrow some serious body armor and face protection. And do the calcs and measurements on paper first.

http://www.google.com/search?client=...UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

You have anger management issues. I'd help you with that but I have more than a few of my own.
Brake? You just walk it around with 2 "rods of some sort", like rebar.
Just don't let go of the wrong one.
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Old 02-22-2012, 02:09 PM   #19
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Garage Door Unbalanced - Adding Larger or Additional Spring?


I am going to use some of the direction at:

http://www.truetex.com/garage.htm

to calculate the springs needed for this application.

If you search for 'excel', he links to a few excel spreadsheets that do the math for you if needed.

Hopefully this will help others that are trying to do a similar DIY job.
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Old 02-22-2012, 02:55 PM   #20
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Garage Door Unbalanced - Adding Larger or Additional Spring?


I have to give you credit, Super.
I did Process Commentary ("You have anger management issues.") on you and you did not respond with more insults. Therefore, you seem to be able to benefit from the observations of other people.
For you, there is hope.

For me psych stuff is just a hobby but even I can tell that some other people on this forum, past and present, demonstrate and have demonstrated some serious character pathology.
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Old 02-25-2012, 11:08 PM   #21
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Garage Door Unbalanced - Adding Larger or Additional Spring?


In order to do the job properly you should insulate your door. Then weigh your door, you will need to float your spring to do this. You can than call your local garage door dealer and tell them the weight, height of your door. As well as the diameter of the cable drums. Assuming you have a standard lift door.
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Old 03-17-2012, 11:21 PM   #22
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Garage Door Unbalanced - Adding Larger or Additional Spring?


I am not an expert concerning the rewinding of springs on garage doors, but I have done a few. Your photos show what looks like a "light duty" spring compared to what "I" would expect to see on a garage door that size. If there are accommodations on the bracket for an additional spring of the same size I would do that, especially in light of the fact you'll be adding some additional weight with your insulation. As for the associated safety hazards, yes there are always things that can (and do) happen to those who jump in blind or ignorant to mechanical dangers. Usually you will succeed if you do the research and get the tools and safety equipment needed to do the job safely.

Last edited by CARSMills; 03-18-2012 at 08:08 PM. Reason: Apparently someone with more experience says: following my advice would be a bad idea
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Old 03-18-2012, 07:00 AM   #23
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Garage Door Unbalanced - Adding Larger or Additional Spring?


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I am not an expert concerning the rewinding of springs on garage doors, but I have done a few. Your photos show what looks like a "light duty" spring compared to what "I" would expect to see on a garage door that size. If there are accommodations on the bracket for an additional spring of the same size I would do that, especially in light of the fact you'll be adding some additional weight with your insulation. As for the associated safety hazards, yes there are always things that can (and do) happen to those who jump in blind or ignorant to mechanical dangers. Usually you will succeed if you do the research and get the tools and safety equipment needed to do the job safely.
Springs are made for the weight and height of the door as well as diameter of the cable drum. The different inch pounds per turn are determined any the length of the spring. The inside diameter of the spring and the thickness of the spring wire. I'm sure after reading this you can understand why following your advice would be a bad idea especially for someone with no experience.
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Old 03-18-2012, 07:16 PM   #24
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Garage Door Unbalanced - Adding Larger or Additional Spring?


SG,
insulate your door, unwind the spring. Place a bathroom scale under each side of the door at the ends. Add up the weight. Go to your local garage door supplier and show them what you have, including door size. They'll look up the proper weight and length springs for your door. What's your door doing now, not staying up at the halfway point, or not staying up at the top of its travel? Also, any manufacturer's stickers on the door to tell you who made it? Looks like a 16' x 7', steel pan door. The couple manufacturers that I deal with always have two springs on a 16' door. That's why I'm curious to see what you have there.
Mike Hawkins
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Old 05-29-2013, 11:12 AM   #25
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Garage Door Unbalanced - Adding Larger or Additional Spring?


I have just replaced torsion springs on my garage door. I am alive and well and no ER visits. This can be done by DIYers. It is dangerous, but so is working on electric stuff in your house. If you do not take proper precautions you can get killed. Enough said. I wanted to post a potentially useful link to an online torsion spring dealer that has lots of video tutorials that are excellent in preparing a DIYer for the job. They also sell springs, but I am neither connected with them in any way nor did I buy anything from them. I bought my springs elsewhere (different topic). However, the site mentioned also has a spring rate calculator (of sorts) that will show the lift force of the given spring. I used the calculator to upgrade my broken spring to a larger spring with the same lift force, which in effect increases the spring's cycle life. I increased wire diameter and length of the spring to yield similar lift force. The result is pretty close, but I think the springs I got a slightly heavier than the door. They are very close, though and I am planning on insulating or adding some weight to the door anyway. Here is the site link. Again, I am not at all affiliated with it and I have never bought anything from them. Just found it by googling.
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