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Old 07-01-2012, 11:22 PM   #16
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Door sill surface leveling


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Fix the paint, then the door.
Yeah, might just have to do that before the storm door goes in.

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But honestly you have to ask just how much obsessing about it is worth the time.
Hehe, I think you nailed it. I get bogged down in details often times. I was thinking about using dremel tool afterwards to "age" it a bit.

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My final bit of advice is if you buy a planer (or rent one) that you try out using it on a separate scrap piece of wood...
Very good piece of advice. Thanks. I'll try getting a hang of it first. Thanks!

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Old 07-01-2012, 11:37 PM   #17
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Door sill surface leveling


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I would not put an air tight glass door on a south facing entry with an old wood door. Particularly if it's a dark color.
Oh really? It does get *some* sun, which is blocked at times by the trees. Seems like we're getting conflicting opinions here.

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Have you pulled interior trim off to insure that any voids are properly filled? A thick heavy solid wood door is not going to pass that much sound anyway. But an empty cavity around it will.
We've got an original door there. Having a mail slot in the middle of it is part of the problem. I don't think I'd feel comfortable removing the original decorative trim w/o damaging either trim or walls, or both. My soundproofing research does point out that voids around the trim could be a contributing factor. I might have to have somebody else look into doing that part for me.

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If you think about it, an expanding bubble of hot air trapped by the storm has to go somewhere and in the summer, if it can't go outside, it's coming inside, increasing your ac load ( a little)
The living room is actually one of our coldest rooms so I we probably won't care if some of the heat is dispersed in there. Good point though, it has to go somewhere.

Thanks for your comments!
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Old 07-04-2012, 08:41 PM   #18
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Door sill surface leveling


There's nothing special about removing trim. Just use a utility knife around the outside edges to separate it from the wall paint. Then just carefully pry it up from the wall. One way to avoid marring either the wall or the trim is to make use of stiff, wide putty knives. Those will help spread the load vs a prybar or screwdriver. Once you're done you just use a bit of caulk in the same color as the trim to cover the score marks left by the utility blade.
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Old 07-15-2012, 11:22 PM   #19
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Door sill surface leveling


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There's nothing special about removing trim.
I don't know... May be a bit much for me to handle. I feel I've got one shot at getting it right. Not something I'd like to experiment with. Pics of trim attached. Thanks!
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Old 07-16-2012, 07:43 AM   #20
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Door sill surface leveling


Look, any job has it's complications. Yes, it's entirely possible the trim won't come off completely cleanly. Or there's been past insect damage and the paint is the only thing holding it together. Worst case there is you'd have to scour a local vintage salvage yard for some trim, or have a milling place create knives to cut new ones. But that shouldn't be an excuse not to get to the solution you desire.

It's one thing to weigh your options and consider the issues. It's another thing to over analyze it and delay it to death.
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Old 07-19-2012, 09:19 PM   #21
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Door sill surface leveling


I appreciate your and others responses. I use that to also judge whether that's a DIY type of job for *me* or not. This trim one while might be trivial to tackle for you doesn't seem that way to *me*. So, I decided to have a contractor do that part for me. Nothing wrong with asking questions in my book. I still plan on doing the door sill part myself though. Thanks again.

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