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-   -   1928 house - help replacing front door lock (http://www.diychatroom.com/f104/1928-house-help-replacing-front-door-lock-180841/)

Rekonn 05-29-2013 08:30 PM

1928 house - help replacing front door lock
 
I'd like to replace the lock on my front door and made a purchase before really looking at what I have. (happy I kept receipt!) I'm guessing the Schlage handleset with deadbolt probably isn't going to work with this door, or can it?

http://imageshack.us/a/img827/8308/frontdoor3.jpghttp://imageshack.us/a/img823/9527/frontdoor2.jpghttp://imageshack.us/a/img43/200/frontdoor1.jpg

Windows on Wash 05-29-2013 09:25 PM

Will not work.

Whats wrong with the existing one?

Rekonn 05-29-2013 10:09 PM

We wanted to change all the locks since we have no idea who has keys to the house currently. The doorknob on the interior has a lot of play. On the exterior, the part you push down with your thumb, starts from a low position, and moves down only 1/4 of an inch. Also, the key needs to be inserted just right, won't turn if inserted too far in. It's functional, but it just feels worn out. Then, just aesthetic personal preference, I don't like the glass doorknob.

RWolff 05-30-2013 12:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rekonn (Post 1190838)
We wanted to change all the locks since we have no idea who has keys to the house currently. The doorknob on the interior has a lot of play. On the exterior, the part you push down with your thumb, starts from a low position, and moves down only 1/4 of an inch. Also, the key needs to be inserted just right, won't turn if inserted too far in. It's functional, but it just feels worn out. Then, just aesthetic personal preference, I don't like the glass doorknob.

Then all you really need is to have the cylinders rekeyed by a locksmith, or replace the cylinders, you shouldnt need to replace the entire lock.
The doorknob might only need tightening.
These older locksets are made out of much better materials than the new junk, the old stuf was solid brass, steel , cast iron, no plastic or aluminum.

Renovator's supply and other restoration hardware dealers carry parts as well as reproductions, they might be able to offer a fix if all else fails.

oh'mike 05-30-2013 06:04 AM

If you have an old locksmith in the area--have that one serviced---many different knobs will fit,so retiring the glass one is not an issue.

Saving the old one will cost less than preparing the door for a modern lock set.

Windows on Wash 05-30-2013 06:26 AM

+2 to the two above comments.

Fix it...don't trash it.

wkearney99 05-30-2013 06:29 AM

To use a new lockset with that old door you'd need to have the hole for the old mortise filled. This would require taking down the door, cutting out the old mortised area and replacing it with new wood. You'd *really* have to want to do this. It'd be much, much simpler and likely cheaper to pay a locksmith to put on a new key cylinder and clean up the old assembly.

TheBobmanNH 05-30-2013 08:42 AM

I also have a door with an older lockset, and the inside knob has a lot of play. Having taken it apart, the thing is solid and will NEVER break, but there's also no way to tighten it up that I can see. So while I'm sure you can fix some of it, if the "play" factor bothers you be aware of that.

Rekonn 06-01-2013 03:26 PM

Ok, thanks! I'll get a locksmith a friend recommended to put in a new key cylinder and fix it up.

AZLambdaK1 06-05-2013 04:06 PM

Small world. I live in San Francisco, and I'm 95% sure I have the exact same mortise lock on my front door! The inside is pretty badly rusted, so we leave the door unlocked (there's also a gate). The glass knob is constantly falling off. I've replaced the J-hooks already, too. We've gotten locked in - ready to leave, turn the knob, knob falls off; and locked out - key turns about a quarter turn then gets stuck. I really want to replace this lock set, but I'm pretty sure it's going to be a pain in the butt to get done! Are these types of locks still made??

wkearney99 06-05-2013 04:13 PM

Scour local salvage yards. Pull the mortise out and take it with you during the hunt. That and take the door measurements (including the mortise height). You never know, you might find a nicer looking door that also has the same mortise setup. That or talk with a local specialty-work locksmith. They might have a line on finding stuff like that and it might not be as expensive to repair as you think.

Rekonn 06-05-2013 04:15 PM

Very small world - I lived in San Francisco for almost 4 years. My wife hates our lock so much she wants to replace whole door and frame too.

AZLambdaK1 06-05-2013 04:21 PM

I can completely vibe with that! The front door was once a solid door, but someone along the way thought it'd look nice to cut the center and add a piece of glass... then shoddily tack some trim around it to hold it in place! The more I look at that door, the more things I find wrong with it. I'm so glad there's a gate.

oh'mike 06-05-2013 06:46 PM

If the door has no real charm and needs replacing---then,by all means,change it.

Retaining the integrity of an antique feature in a house is great---

So is saving the high cost of converting a good door to use a modern lock.


But if the door and lock set are shot----go for it.

Modern mortice lock sets are still being made----bring a full wallet.--Mike---

jagans 06-05-2013 07:51 PM

You could bring that Lockset back to life, as it is solid brass. You simply cannot buy that quality today. I would get some brasso and buff that sucker up like new. A couple of springs and a new barrel and you have a new lock. I dont understand what you dont like about the glass knob, but to each his own. You should be able to find a brass knob for it.


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