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-   -   What are the machines that vacuum out attic insulation called? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f103/what-machines-vacuum-out-attic-insulation-called-181087/)

imola ghost 06-01-2013 11:10 PM

What are the machines that vacuum out attic insulation called?
 
I want to remove the old stuff to do some sealing up, can lighting installation and structured wiring install while the stuff was out.

joecaption 06-02-2013 06:32 AM

Why not just move it out of the way?

imola ghost 06-02-2013 07:26 AM

Like I said I am running all new structured wiring, installing some new can lights and sealing up all of the seams. I'm also installing some baffles along the soffets. With it out of the way I can see where everything needs to be sealed up and plus I want to install new stuff.

747 06-02-2013 07:31 AM

I don't know. I have only see guys have them who do blown in insulation. I agree with you. its the way to go.

Fix'n it 06-02-2013 09:38 AM

a large shop vac, lots of hose, and a helper ?

wkearney99 06-02-2013 10:54 AM

That and a respirator and full tyvek suit. You do NOT want to be breathing that stuff or getting it on you. And several gallons of water to keep from getting dehydrated while you're schvitzing in that hot suit...

Be sure the insulation up there isn't vermiculite or something else with asbestos in it. It's often better to leave stuff like that in place rather than disturb it. At the very least I'd have a sample of it checked before disturbing any of it.

Windows on Wash 06-02-2013 11:13 AM

http://www.sunbeltrentals.com/equipm...500&catid=s475

The places that rent them normally have the bags as well.

Be sure to follow all of wkearney's recommendations as it pertains to PPE and precautions. You will have no idea that you are getting that dehydrated that fast. Trust me.

wkearney99 06-02-2013 11:49 AM

Funny that Sunbelt's number is 'No Sweat' and we're talking about removing attic insulation...

imola ghost 06-02-2013 12:11 PM

Thanks for the ideas. Fortunately my attic insulation is just blown in loose fill blow-in fiber glass insulation. It's not itchy the many times I've been up there. but I'll still wear a mask and respirator.

RWolff 06-02-2013 01:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by imola ghost (Post 1193338)
Thanks for the ideas. Fortunately my attic insulation is just blown in loose fill blow-in fiber glass insulation. It's not itchy the many times I've been up there. but I'll still wear a mask and respirator.

I don't like that stuff either, it's about one notch "safer" than the vermiculite since it's GLASS and glass when breathed in does not break down or "go away."
The major companies that produce the stuff- Owens-Corning and Johns-Manville have extremely sordid histories in the asbestos arena, one going bankrupt as WR Grace company did- to get out of the lawsuits for health damage etc.
I wouldn't trust either one of them and their claims of safety on anything, they have proven they are willing to lie in court, and even file for bankruptcy to save their behinds from the lawsuits.
Mansville's biggest shareholder was none other than JP Morgan who has a whole nasty history of his own surrounding the events that caused the stock market crash of '29


As of May 2011, Owens-Illinois has been named in thousands of lawsuits by plaintiffs who say their health suffered after they were exposed to asbestos in the company’s products. As of December 31, 2009, the company reported that it had 7,000 asbestos claims pending and had resolved approximately 10,000 claims the previous year alone.

Johns-Manville Corporation reorganized as the Manville Corporation in 1981. Soon after, they filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. This move was necessitated by an increasing number of lawsuits brought by workers (and their families) that were harmed as a result of their occupational exposure to dangerous asbestos dust. The company emerged from bankruptcy in 1988.


Quote:

Hazards It is important for InterNACHI inspectors to understand the health risks associated with exposure to fiberglass insulation. These risks are not, at present, fully understood or agreed upon, but it is generally accepted that, in certain situations, it has the potential to cause physical harm. Small particles that come into contact with skin can lodge in pores and cause itchiness, rashes and irritation. When inhaled, particles can cause coughing, nosebleeds, and other respiratory ailments. Very fine airborne particles are capable of becoming deeply lodged in the lungs and are believed by many to cause cancer and other serious afflictions. OSHA considers this threat to be serious enough that it requires fiberglass insulation to carry a cancer warning label.

When it is disturbed, fiberglass insulation releases particulates into the air which may be inhaled by those installing or removing it, or by property inspectors crawling through attics or crawlspaces.

If you must disturb fiberglass insulation, wear gloves, long-sleeved shirts, pants and goggles. A respirator with a particulate filter should be used to prevent inhalation of the potentially dangerous fibers.

Before removing fiberglass insulation, it is a good idea to dampen the area to prevent particles from entering the airspace. Afterwards, wash your hands with water, preferably cold water, as warm water can expand pores which have trapped particles and allow them to travel deeper into your skin.


An Alternative – Cellulose
Cellulose, a plant-based insulator, is the oldest form of home insulation and, at times, has been produced from sawdust, cotton, straw, hemp, and other plant materials with low thermal-conductivity. Today, it is produced from recycled newspapers that are later treated with chemicals that reduce its ignition potential. It became popular in the 1970s due to the oil crisis, although it suffered from competition with fiberglass insulation as a result of fire-standards lobbying by the fiberglass and mineral companies. Cellulose must be chemically treated in order to reduce its flammable properties, although it always has the potential to burn. These chemicals, usually sodium borate, boric acid, or ammonium sulfate, are generally considered safe for human contact.

This material provides a number of advantages over fiberglass – it is inexpensive, significantly reduces airflow, and is not believed to pose any serious health risks. It is possible that the material can produce harmful off-gasses from the ink contained in the newspapers, but insulation is generally contained in sealed locations, so this is not likely to be a health concern. As is true with fiberglass, protect your lungs with a breathing mask when handling cellulose insulation.



TarheelTerp 06-02-2013 02:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by imola ghost (Post 1193338)
Thanks for the ideas. Fortunately my attic insulation is just blown in loose fill blow-in fiber glass insulation. It's not itchy the many times I've been up there. but I'll still wear a mask and respirator.

I've found that a leaf rake will move it around just fine.

Rake the material away from the farthest area.
Do whatever you need to in that one area.
Rake the material from the next area over the first area.
Repeat.

When you're all done you add new to the last area.
The others should have plenty. All nicely fluffed.

Start wayyyyyyyy early before it gets hot.
Plan to quit by sun up

wkearney99 06-02-2013 02:51 PM

I was going to say plastic snow shovel, but a leaf rake would move a fair bit of material too. Maybe some 'kid sized' ones.

But I'd still question the rationale behind removing it entirely. Don't forget, that's going to be a LARGE volume of material. It's one thing to move some of it around in piles, but think about how BIG a bag it's going to take to hold it.

Here's a better idea, call and have someone else come do it. This is just one nasty job I'd readily pay someone else to perform.

digitalplumber 06-02-2013 06:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wkearney99
I was going to say plastic snow shovel, but a leaf rake would move a fair bit of material too. Maybe some 'kid sized' ones.

But I'd still question the rationale behind removing it entirely. Don't forget, that's going to be a LARGE volume of material. It's one thing to move some of it around in piles, but think about how BIG a bag it's going to take to hold it.

Here's a better idea, call and have someone else come do it. This is just one nasty job I'd readily pay someone else to perform.

I have it's very expensive. They wanted 2k for a 1700 sq ft home.

You can get bags online cheaper!

wkearney99 06-02-2013 06:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by digitalplumber (Post 1193694)
I have it's very expensive. They wanted 2k for a 1700 sq ft home.

You can get bags online cheaper!

Right, so factor the cost of the bags and the rental for the beast of a machine, along with making sure you've got a 'friend' dumb enough to help you on this adventure. Someone's going to have to mind the machine, the bags and the hose while you're getting braised in the attic.

Then factor the health costs of dealing with that crap.

I'd shop around for a better price. There's gotta be someone else with that gear dumb enough to do it cheaper.

digitalplumber 06-02-2013 06:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wkearney99

Right, so factor the cost of the bags and the rental for the beast of a machine, along with making sure you've got a 'friend' dumb enough to help you on this adventure. Someone's going to have to mind the machine, the bags and the hose while you're getting braised in the attic.

Then factor the health costs of dealing with that crap.

I'd shop around for a better price. There's gotta be someone else with that gear dumb enough to do it cheaper.

I agree but for 500 for bag and machine.....i have done a lot of looking in Houston, can't find for less.

By the way for the guy renting the machine if you get pm on sat they are closed Sunday so you bring back Monday.


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