Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Insulation

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-04-2011, 02:38 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 40
Rewards Points: 25
Default

sound proofing walls


HI, I am renovating an existing reno in a basement. There are 2 bachelor apts adjacent to each other. There are 2 walls between them. 1 wall consists of 1/2 inch drywall on each side and pink insulation with vapor barrier in the middle.

Should I tear out this wall and put soundproofing insulation in place of the pink fiberglass? Or just put up another layer of 1/2 inch drywall to cut down on the noise? Does r12 fiberglass provide any noise proofing?

The other wall was framed with 2x3" studs and 1/2 inch drywall. I wanted to put in roxul sound/fire proof insulation. Will it fit a 2x3 or does it have to be 2x4?

Thanks
Steve

tiki16 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2011, 09:19 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 130
Rewards Points: 75
Default

sound proofing walls


Do what ever you want. Yes, pink fiberglass insulation will cut down noise. There are a lot of ways to sound proof. If I was you and I was thinking of an additional layer of drywall I would use 5/8's drywall.

dberladyn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2011, 08:47 AM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 95
Rewards Points: 75
Default

sound proofing walls


Look up Green Glue if you are adding a new layer of drywall on top of the existing. I have never used it but many people on avsforum swear by it.

http://www.greengluecompany.com/upgr...stingWalls.php
leungw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2011, 04:30 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 445
Rewards Points: 250
Default

sound proofing walls


There are many options with large cost range. A good answer depends on your budget and time. You can use insulation, quiet rock, double walls, staggered studs, resilient channel.

The idea is to add mass and/or physically decouple the walls. Also, make sure there are no penetrations in the walls that will allow a path for sounds to travel.

Last edited by acerunner; 05-05-2011 at 04:34 PM.
acerunner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2011, 12:01 AM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Southeast US
Posts: 244
Rewards Points: 150
Default

sound proofing walls


The soundproof sites I've read say that the acoustic insulation is not much more effective than the run of the mill pink stuff. A completely decoupled wall (2 separate walls) is the most effective method for soundproofing, but I'm not quite clear on how your 2 walls are set up. If you have 2 walls with drywall only on the living space side of each wall, perfect. However, if it is two walls with 3 or 4 sides drywall, it is creating what is called the 'Triple Leaf Effect'. Here's a link:

http://www.soundproofingcompany.com/...e_leaf_effect/

And here's more:
http://www.soundproofingcompany.com/library/articles/

http://www.greengluecompany.com/technicallibrary.php


Lots of info at these sites. I did much research for soundproofing a wall between two rooms. I'm using double layers of drywall with Green Glue in-between the layers. The sound dampening is serious. I also have a case of acoustic sealant (caulk) and putty pads for electrical outlets.

There's really too much information to convey in one post, but the links above will be useful.
rightit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2011, 08:59 AM   #6
Soundproofing Guy
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 235
Rewards Points: 150
Default

sound proofing walls


I'd also be interested in hearing more details about exactly how the walls are built.
Ted White is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2011, 04:39 PM   #7
Newbie
 
diy-581's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 19
Rewards Points: 10
Default

sound proofing walls


I wonder how well silicone sealant stacks up against the Green Glue stuff. Their site gives a chart against regular construction adhesive, but not silicone.

Also, I wonder how well cinder block walls (hollow or filled with sand, gravel, or concrete) is compared to sheetrock wall construction (with and without the Green Glue)....

I'm getting ready to build a hangar and apartment at an airpark and even though I don't find the noise of an aircraft all that irritating when I'm outside, I would prefer to minimize it inside when I'm trying to sleep...
diy-581 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2011, 09:10 AM   #8
Soundproofing Guy
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 235
Rewards Points: 150
Default

sound proofing walls


Quote:
Originally Posted by diy-581 View Post
I wonder how well silicone sealant stacks up against the Green Glue stuff.
People have wondered for the past 10 years. It's an urban legend. It's far too stiff and elastic. Plus, you'll likely find silicone costs more on a per-ounce basis.

Quote:
Originally Posted by diy-581 View Post
Also, I wonder how well cinder block walls (hollow or filled with sand, gravel, or concrete) is compared to sheetrock wall construction (with and without the Green Glue)....
A solid block wall filled with concrete would do well
Ted White is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2011, 09:20 AM   #9
Learning by Doing
 
Leah Frances's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Easton, Maryland
Posts: 3,156
Rewards Points: 2,000
Blog Entries: 7
Default

sound proofing walls


Wouldn't a hollow block wall do better than a solid one? Being that sound travels better through denser medium.....
__________________
If I could only remember to THINK about what I was doing before I did it.
Leah Frances is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2011, 09:22 AM   #10
Soundproofing Guy
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 235
Rewards Points: 150
Default

sound proofing walls


No. Mass is the primary driver in sound isolation.
Ted White is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2011, 09:28 AM   #11
Learning by Doing
 
Leah Frances's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Easton, Maryland
Posts: 3,156
Rewards Points: 2,000
Blog Entries: 7
Default

sound proofing walls


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted White View Post
No. Mass is the primary driver in sound isolation.
That makes sense. Is it the same for rigid mass as flexible mass?
__________________
If I could only remember to THINK about what I was doing before I did it.
Leah Frances is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2011, 09:30 AM   #12
Soundproofing Guy
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 235
Rewards Points: 150
Default

sound proofing walls


Yes it is, although flexible mass will not have a resonance point that we can hear. Rigid mass will have an audible resonance point (called a coincidence point) which is why we damp that rigid mass.
Ted White is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Ted White For This Useful Post:
Leah Frances (05-09-2011)
Old 05-09-2011, 05:43 PM   #13
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 130
Rewards Points: 75
Default

sound proofing walls


There's lots of ways to sound proof, some of these although sound means of doing so are over kill in my opinion. For the sound seperation of two suites, an insulated wall with 5/8 drywall (and acoustical sealant) on either side should suffice. Want more preotection add another layer of 5/8's drywall. If you really want to ensure you don't hear anything as the poster above mentioned build both sides as seperate untouching walls.
dberladyn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2011, 06:32 PM   #14
Soundproofing Guy
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 235
Rewards Points: 150
Default

sound proofing walls


I think that's generally true.

As a side note, insulation in a single stud (coupled) wall can drop the noise but not by much. Tests would show you'll get more bang by adding the drywall as you say.
Ted White is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2011, 08:29 AM   #15
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Southeast US
Posts: 244
Rewards Points: 150
Default

sound proofing walls


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted White View Post
I think that's generally true.

As a side note, insulation in a single stud (coupled) wall can drop the noise but not by much. Tests would show you'll get more bang by adding the drywall as you say.
Any comments on insulation in a 5" staggered wall (created from an existing 2x4 wall)? I plan on pink 3.5" paper-backed (paper facing toward the new space..."new staggered stud side"), stapled between the 'pre-existing' studs (about 8" cavities, unless I compress it behind the new staggered studs, which seems counter-productive). Is there a more efficient way to do this?

Thanks,
Mark

rightit is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Finishing Basement Walls, Inside Perimeter Drains, and Moisture, Oh My BSponz1 Building & Construction 1 02-08-2011 01:20 PM
Need help with very ugly basement walls GrandmaStormy Remodeling 5 03-05-2009 02:43 PM
Sound proofing ceiling West4141 Building & Construction 4 02-28-2009 01:26 PM
Replace exterior walls or build false walls Medic507 Carpentry 3 11-12-2008 09:48 AM
Sound proof walls!!! Fux39 Building & Construction 3 11-29-2006 08:28 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.