Forums | Home Repair | Home Improvement | Painting | Interior Decorating | Remodeling | Landscaping


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Insulation

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-15-2011, 03:45 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Plattsburgh, NY
Posts: 241
Share |
Default

Increasing Home Efficency


I have an oil boiler and would like to save as much money as possible this winter. I'm in northern NY and it gets pretty cold. House is 1 story, built in the 1950s. Attic and basement are both unfinished and not used. There's R19 fiberglass insulation (with paper backing) on the basement ceiling and attic floor. The house gets pretty hot in the summer. There's new vinyl windows and doors in the whole house.

1. What would be the most cost-effective things to insulate/increase insulation on? What type of insulation should I use?

2. Basement walls are block and uninsulated. Should I insulate them?

3. Boiler and hot water pipes are uninsulated. Should I insulate them or is it good to let some heat into the basement?
matt151617 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2011, 04:13 PM   #2
Windows & Remodeling
 
HomeSealed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Milwaukee,WI
Posts: 1,367
Default

Increasing Home Efficency


1. Insulate and airseal the attic.
2.Yes... although this is probably not the most pertinent issue in the basement, let alone the home. Insulate/airseal the sill boxes/rim joist first.
3.Insulation is good.

I'd highly recommend an energy audit. This would give you a detailed report of the problem spots in your home and the results that you could see by addressing them. It will help you prioritize the projects on a cost vs benefit basis.They typically cost $2-$400, however, many states have rewards programs where you can get cash back based on the improvements and performance achieved thereafter. In WI, most homeowners get more back than they spend on the audit itself with the Focus on Energy program.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
,
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
,
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
,
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
,
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
HomeSealed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2011, 05:41 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Freeport Maine
Posts: 484
Default

Increasing Home Efficency


Quote:
Originally Posted by matt151617 View Post
I have an oil boiler and would like to save as much money as possible this winter. I'm in northern NY and it gets pretty cold. House is 1 story, built in the 1950s. Attic and basement are both unfinished and not used. There's R19 fiberglass insulation (with paper backing) on the basement ceiling and attic floor. The house gets pretty hot in the summer. There's new vinyl windows and doors in the whole house.

1. What would be the most cost-effective things to insulate/increase insulation on? What type of insulation should I use?

2. Basement walls are block and uninsulated. Should I insulate them?

3. Boiler and hot water pipes are uninsulated. Should I insulate them or is it good to let some heat into the basement?
1) Attic seal and R value increase, as mentioned
2) How deep is the basement? I personally think it's a waste of time to insulate below the frost line. Definitely insulate the sill though..
4) I wouldn't bother. A warm basement is only going to contribute to a warm 1st floor.
1910NE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2011, 12:27 AM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Plattsburgh, NY
Posts: 241
Default

Increasing Home Efficency


Basement is about 7 feet, about 6 feet of it is below the ground. I was told it stays in the mid 50s without additional heating.

Thanks for the info on the energy audit. New York offers free ones, I looked it up and submitted the paperwork.

What's the best way to add more insulation to the attic? Additional rolled fiberglass? Or blow-in?
matt151617 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2011, 08:55 AM   #5
Exterior Construction
 
Windows on Wash's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: VA, MD, DC
Posts: 5,067
Default

Increasing Home Efficency


+1

To the previous comments and recommendations.

Blow in (cellulose) is best.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Windows on Wash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2011, 09:40 AM   #6
Windows & Remodeling
 
HomeSealed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Milwaukee,WI
Posts: 1,367
Default

Increasing Home Efficency


Agreed on blown-in cellulose.... That is great that you can get the audit for free. Do you know if they do a post test as well? That really insures that the installations are effective.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
,
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
,
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
,
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
,
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
HomeSealed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2011, 01:31 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Plattsburgh, NY
Posts: 241
Default

Increasing Home Efficency


Not sure if they'll do a post test or not.

I researched blown-in, it would be about $700 to have a professional do it, and $450 to do it myself. Lowes has rolls of R-30 right now for $10, so this would be the cheapest option for me; add another layer of insulation sideways across the existing attic insulation.

As far as the basement; at some point I plan on finishing it. What exactly should I insulate now? With the pipes uninsulated and below the floor insulation, it seems like that heat will mostly be wasted. Do I just stuff fiberglass insulation into the gap between the floor and the start of the foundation blocks?
matt151617 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2011, 03:00 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 36
Default

Increasing Home Efficency


The rim joist (space between basement ceiling joists) should be air sealed. This can be achieved using Great Stuff Pro applied using a professional reusable gun. You can get the gun at HD for $40 and the cartridges for ~$9 each. Spray in the crack (corner) all away around and then use fiberglass batts for R value. I've also read using XPS cut to fit and pressed tight against rim joist. And then foam
Any gap all away around.

Attic should be air sealed. And then insulated. Blowing cellulose will be easier yo do than fiberglass bats in the attic. Remember, the value is in every tiny detail. Blown cellulose will fill gaps that are very hard to fill using fiberglass.

You should probably go to www.buildingscience.com for lots of detailed possible solutions for your zone.
DoItMyselfToo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2011, 03:14 PM   #9
Learning by Doing
 
Leah Frances's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Easton, Maryland
Posts: 3,156
Blog Entries: 7
Default

Increasing Home Efficency


Quote:
Originally Posted by 1910NE View Post
1) Attic seal and R value increase, as mentioned
2) How deep is the basement? I personally think it's a waste of time to insulate below the frost line. Definitely insulate the sill though..
4) I wouldn't bother. A warm basement is only going to contribute to a warm 1st floor.
1910NE, I respectfully disagree based on my own experience. We have an oil fired boiler with single pipe steam. We had a toasty warm basement - I dropped a big chunk of change to insulate all the supply pipes with solid 2-4 inch thick insulation. This has saved us a MASSIVE amount of money - we've recouped the cost of insulation AND our oil consumption dropped in half (and we actually keep the house warmer than we did that first winter).

I'd rather have more money in the bank, a warmer house, and a cool basement - the basement never gets colder than 58 degrees in my zone anyway - even when the air temp is in the teens.
__________________
If I could only remember to THINK about what I was doing before I did it.
Leah Frances is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2011, 03:19 PM   #10
Member
 
Msradell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Louisville Kentucky
Posts: 847
Default

Increasing Home Efficency


Insulating the rim joints should be your first priority in the basement.
Msradell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2011, 03:41 PM   #11
Learning by Doing
 
Leah Frances's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Easton, Maryland
Posts: 3,156
Blog Entries: 7
Default

Increasing Home Efficency


Quote:
Originally Posted by Msradell View Post
Insulating the rim joints should be your first priority in the basement.
@Msradell I'm agreeing with you a lot today.
__________________
If I could only remember to THINK about what I was doing before I did it.
Leah Frances is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2011, 04:59 PM   #12
Exterior Construction
 
Windows on Wash's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: VA, MD, DC
Posts: 5,067
Default

Increasing Home Efficency


Quote:
Originally Posted by Leah Frances View Post
1910NE, I respectfully disagree based on my own experience. We have an oil fired boiler with single pipe steam. We had a toasty warm basement - I dropped a big chunk of change to insulate all the supply pipes with solid 2-4 inch thick insulation. This has saved us a MASSIVE amount of money - we've recouped the cost of insulation AND our oil consumption dropped in half (and we actually keep the house warmer than we did that first winter).

I'd rather have more money in the bank, a warmer house, and a cool basement - the basement never gets colder than 58 degrees in my zone anyway - even when the air temp is in the teens.
+1

Heating the basement is like heating the Earth and is not necessary.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Windows on Wash is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Windows on Wash For This Useful Post:
HomeSealed (09-18-2011)
Old 09-19-2011, 09:33 PM   #13
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Plattsburgh, NY
Posts: 241
Default

Increasing Home Efficency


Went out today and bought $40 worth of pipe insulation and did all the boiler and domestic hot water pipes. The rim joist is difficult to get to, there's a board covering it for some reason. But it's full of R19.

I crawled up the attic today (heard a weird noise up there last night and wanted to see if there's any animals up there). There seems to be tar paper/felt under the insulation. Then there's R19 batts (unfaced) on top of that. Over the sunroom (which has good vinyl windows and was used year-round by the previous owners) there's no insulation! No vapor barrier, nothing, just plain drywall.

So what's my best approach to insulating the attic properly? It's a very low attic and difficult to move around in. A few spots (going to sunroom) require lying on your stomach and sliding on the plank walkways. I don't think a rolled up batt would even fit. Should I hire someone to do blown-in?
matt151617 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2011, 11:34 PM   #14
Exterior Construction
 
Windows on Wash's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: VA, MD, DC
Posts: 5,067
Default

Increasing Home Efficency


Blown in is probably best.

What is the attic venting like?
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Windows on Wash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2011, 11:52 PM   #15
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Plattsburgh, NY
Posts: 241
Default

Increasing Home Efficency


I could see sunlight under the eves in a few spots (soffit vents I'm guessing). There's 2 vents in the attic ceiling also. It was about 65 and sunny here today and the attic was probably about 80.
matt151617 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
1938 TN Home - My First Home, My First project, Tons of Pictures!!! Firefighter3244 Project Showcase 76 05-04-2013 01:57 PM
mobile home service to bond or not to bond rikmac Electrical 35 03-17-2010 03:47 PM
Owning a home (not a mobile home) on leased land? Badfish740 Off Topic 11 03-30-2008 09:34 AM
A facelift for your home Grumpy Remodeling 0 07-07-2004 07:43 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.