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-   -   Does Fireproof Insulation Exist?? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f103/does-fireproof-insulation-exist-91753/)

Phriend 01-09-2011 12:58 AM

Does Fireproof Insulation Exist??
 
Hi friends,

I just installed an old fireplace insert, but there is now about a 1-inch gap between the fireplace insert and the fireplace wall itself. I am looking for some sort of fireproof insulation that I can stuff between the two in order to fill the gap. (Ideally I would like the material to be airtight, fireproof, and non-toxic). Any ideas?

Note: Specific product recommendations would be very helpful! :thumbsup:

Shamus 01-09-2011 05:17 AM

A few dozen manufacturers out there with many options for different applications. Do a search for "fireproof firebrick panels".

Bondo 01-09-2011 05:54 AM

Ayuh,... Have you ever tried to burn plain ole Fiberglass,..??

It Don't....

Shamus 01-09-2011 08:04 AM

Depending on the brand/mfg process some of it does indeed burn. It's the resin not the glass that burns. I guess the better statement might be that Brand X fiberglass does not burn.

Just Sayin.:thumbsup:

Example: Owens Corning Pink unfaced Fiberglass states:
"Do not use in areas where the temperature will exceed 250* F".

Phriend 01-09-2011 12:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shamus (Post 565906)
A few dozen manufacturers out there with many options for different applications. Do a search for "fireproof firebrick panels".

Thanks. Are these panels soft? Ideally I just want something soft that I can stuff in the opening. (Heck, I was even thinking about using socks, but I was hoping that I could find something better.

Ideally I just need something soft to stuff in the opening that will stop airflow and won't catch on fire. :)

algored2deth 01-09-2011 08:41 PM

Take a look at roxul or, in general, mineral wool based insulation. The stuff is practically fireproof.


http://www.roxul.com/home

http://www.certainteed.com/products/...wool%29/317389

dennis

Jackofall1 01-09-2011 08:46 PM

Use Fiberfrax it is rated to 2600*F

http://www.unifrax.com/web/UnifraxHo...6?OpenDocument

pyper 01-10-2011 05:37 PM

Um, did you get the instructions off the manufacturers website?

It sounds like your insert doesn't fit your fireplace. It's not worth burning your house down for.

But in a proper installation, there shouldn't be any way for cold air to get in behind the insert anyway.

masterofall 01-14-2011 10:12 PM

Mineral wool for sure. I'm sure it has been used and probably still is used for metal insulated wood stove flues.
This is something you will not be visable correct?

Termite 01-14-2011 11:13 PM

Agreed, mineral wool/rock wool would be the best product for a noncombustible insulation.

That being said, what you propose may be a pretty bad idea. Many fireplace inserts and fireplace units require a certain amount of air space between them and adjoining surfaces, combustible or not. Filling that required air gap with insulation may lead to overheating and subsequent potential for fire. Refer to the manufacturer's installation guide and don't deviate from it.

Phriend 01-21-2011 11:01 PM

Anyone happen to know if mineral wools & stone wools are safe and non-toxic? I've heard that the dust from these wools can cause respiratory ailments. (Will this dust occur after the wool is installed? Or does the dust only occur during handling?)

Also, do you think steel wool would work?

Thanks again!

jklingel 01-22-2011 12:36 AM

Steel wool? Interesting concept. Maybe using it as a mesh and gobbing in refractory caulk. ??? Whatever you stuff in there, caulk it over anyway. FG won't burn at lower temps, but it melts. Not a good app for it.

jklingel 05-01-2011 03:14 PM

Which reminds me. A rep from Eutectic (sp?) welding supplies gave a demo to one of my classes, and he had a putty of some kind. He put a layer in his palm, about 1/2" thick, and hit it for several seconds with a welding torch. I did not notice any steam coming off his hand, so I guess it worked for that period of time. I have no idea how spendy the stuff was/is, or where to get it, but maybe the stuff referred to above is it, or similar.

jcrack_corn 05-02-2011 03:03 PM

rock wool is safer than fiberglass (which is safe itself).

you can look up the info for yourself, but i believe the rock wool fibers stay in the lungs for up to a month (and are generally out within a week)....which is a relatively short period of time.

fiberglass has some longer fibers that can embedd and take quite a big longer to remove.

regarding rock wool and fires....well it is born in fire that is hot enough to melt steel and it seems to do fine! lol.


Quote:

Originally Posted by Phriend (Post 575407)
Anyone happen to know if mineral wools & stone wools are safe and non-toxic? I've heard that the dust from these wools can cause respiratory ailments. (Will this dust occur after the wool is installed? Or does the dust only occur during handling?)

Also, do you think steel wool would work?

Thanks again!


jcrack_corn 05-02-2011 03:08 PM

heres a guy that gives a summary and lists all his available references

http://www.gearslutz.com/board/bass-...rs-review.html


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