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Old 12-01-2012, 09:45 AM   #1
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Cellulose vs. Fiberglass Insulation in Walls to lower energy bills


I would like to new if anyone has used Cellulose vs. Fiberglass insulation in attic and walls. What was the out come of it? Which one saved you the most in energy bills?
Has any one use d Instant Energy Solutions (ENERGY EXPERTS)?

I am putting in R-60 Cellulose Insulation over my Fiberglass Insulation to cut my heating bills in the attic.
How much loose do you loose on the walls?
The house was built in 1973 and very poor insulated.
Give your feed back. I live in Ohio.

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Old 12-01-2012, 12:28 PM   #2
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Cellulose vs. Fiberglass Insulation in Walls to lower energy bills


Sealing air leaks, insulating attic space, insulating around the sill & rim joists if you have a cellar or basement does a lot more than insulating the walls. Insulating the walls for the majority just cuts down noise, not stopping air infiltration.

I have no insulation in my walls of my 1937 Bungalow, but have sealed every possible leak, have at least 6" Cellulose in the attic, sealed the attic hatch, R-13 around the Sill & Rim joists in the basement, so I can still have enough air movement into the basement, but not so much that it causes the reverse of what I tried to accomplish.

My house stays cool in the Summer & Warm in the Winter, without the hvac system cycling too much. Another item we knocked off this year, was taking out the old back door, which was never installed properly from the beginning, and put in a new Steel insulated core door, which has helped even more.

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Old 12-01-2012, 01:06 PM   #3
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Cellulose vs. Fiberglass Insulation in Walls to lower energy bills


It sound as if you have done a very good job.

When I have the attic done I will have 12 inches of cellulose insulation in there. At R-60 and that should do the job up there.

I have sealed all around the sills of the basement and insulated it with R-25 and on the walls put R-10 Blue Faom on the walls. and another layer of the same than drywall. Last winter it was nice down there not cold like it was in years past.


My diggest concuren is the walls now. Because the person who built this house was looking out for one person only, how to screw the homeowner and make big bucks off of them.
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Old 12-01-2012, 01:18 PM   #4
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Cellulose vs. Fiberglass Insulation in Walls to lower energy bills


Much as I want to see you buy cellulose insulation, I have to say in all honesty I think adding R60 over existing insulation in Ohio is serious overkill. The Department of Energy suggests R49, and some people think that is overkill in climate zone 5. I live in Ohio too, and if it were my home I wouldn't add more than R38. Even if you only have R11 now that would bring the attic up to near R49. I say "near R49" because there will be some compression of the existing insulation if it's loose fill. Not so much if it's batts.

I agree with the reply emphasizing the importance of caulking and sealing the building shell, but disagree strongly with the statement that adding insulation to walls doesn't help much. Batt insulation is leaky and even very diligent attention to sealing probably won't result in a tight building shell. Dense packing cellulose or the new fiber glass products will produce very tight walls. These materials enhance the effect of good sealing practices

Finally, 6" of insulation is an attic isn't nearly enough. Even 6" of spray foam is only about R36. 6" of cellulose is about R23! 6" of loose fill fiber glass will be well under R19.
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Old 12-01-2012, 01:26 PM   #5
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Cellulose vs. Fiberglass Insulation in Walls to lower energy bills


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Much as I want to see you buy cellulose insulation, I have to say in all honesty I think adding R60 over existing insulation in Ohio is serious overkill. The Department of Energy suggests R49, and some people think that is overkill in climate zone 5. I live in Ohio too, and if it were my home I wouldn't add more than R38. Even if you only have R11 now that would bring the attic up to near R49. I say "near R49" because there will be some compression of the existing insulation if it's loose fill. Not so much if it's batts.

I agree with the reply emphasizing the importance of caulking and sealing the building shell, but disagree strongly with the statement that adding insulation to walls doesn't help much. Batt insulation is leaky and even very diligent attention to sealing probably won't result in a tight building shell. Dense packing cellulose or the new fiber glass products will produce very tight walls. These materials enhance the effect of good sealing practices

Finally, 6" of insulation is an attic isn't nearly enough. Even 6" of spray foam is only about R36. 6" of cellulose is about R23! 6" of loose fill fiber glass will be well under R19.

With what you have said is true about R-49, if you could get the job done at R-49 and when ask if they would put in R-60 and you tell them at the same cost and they agreed in writing wouldn't you take it?
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Old 12-01-2012, 01:55 PM   #6
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Cellulose vs. Fiberglass Insulation in Walls to lower energy bills


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With what you have said is true about R-49, if you could get the job done at R-49 and when ask if they would put in R-60 and you tell them at the same cost and they agreed in writing wouldn't you take it?

The only reason for not accepting more insulation at the same price would be concern for not wasting resources. Can you justify using more than you really need? That's a decision only you can make.
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Old 12-01-2012, 02:20 PM   #7
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Cellulose vs. Fiberglass Insulation in Walls to lower energy bills


I was always told that the more you put up there the more you will save on energy.

And after whacting a demo on what happens with faberglass and cellulose, the cellulose held the heat out more in the summer when it get 80 or 90 and higher so this would help keep the house cooler in the Summer. An keep the heat in in the Winter.
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Old 12-01-2012, 03:02 PM   #8
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Cellulose vs. Fiberglass Insulation in Walls to lower energy bills


Compare none, to some, to excessive vs. cost; http://www.enersavesystems.com/pdf/E...Insulation.pdf

Gary

P.S. be sure the ceiling drywall can support the weight of cellulose; http://www.energyguide.com/library/E...SubjectID=8375
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Old 12-01-2012, 04:21 PM   #9
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Cellulose vs. Fiberglass Insulation in Walls to lower energy bills


Not to change the subject on you but it still is connected to it, we have a whole house ceiling fan that I want to take out and pasteboard the hole closed and in the garage there is a opening where you can go up in the attic, and I plan to put a door on that.

Will I make it to tight up there?

It has a ridge vent and gable vent and they are putting air baffles in it so the air can move out and breath.

Gave me your comments on this.
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Old 12-01-2012, 05:19 PM   #10
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Cellulose vs. Fiberglass Insulation in Walls to lower energy bills


The garage attic should be separate from the house attic OR the garage ceiling drywall with 5/8" Type X, check local AHJ. The access lid/door should be insulated and air-tight to stop flames/smoke spread to roof. A door/drop stairs requires fire-stopping drywall in a garage to keep the ceiling fire-rating. You require soffit venting with your ridge/gable exhaust vents or you will pull conditioned air from the house or moist air from the basement/crawlspace (via walls/wiring,plumbing holes), wetting/dirtying the attic insulation, degrading its R-value; http://www.finehomebuilding.com/PDF/Free/021105092.pdf

Gary
P.S. WH Fan should be ducted outside, not to an attic, depositing excess house moisture on the roof framing/sheathing.
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Old 12-01-2012, 07:01 PM   #11
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Cellulose vs. Fiberglass Insulation in Walls to lower energy bills


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Originally Posted by GBR in WA View Post
The garage attic should be separate from the house attic OR the garage ceiling drywall with 5/8" Type X, check local AHJ. The access lid/door should be insulated and air-tight to stop flames/smoke spread to roof. A door/drop stairs requires fire-stopping drywall in a garage to keep the ceiling fire-rating. You require soffit venting with your ridge/gable exhaust vents or you will pull conditioned air from the house or moist air from the basement/crawlspace (via walls/wiring,plumbing holes), wetting/dirtying the attic insulation, degrading its R-value; http://www.finehomebuilding.com/PDF/Free/021105092.pdf

Gary
P.S. WH Fan should be ducted outside, not to an attic, depositing excess house moisture on the roof framing/sheathing.

I am sorry when I said baffle vents I ment soffit vents.

The grage is not finished and the wall that is part of the hose in the grage only has a craw opening at the ceiling level of the attic. So I was thing of putting a door there. Does it need to be a fire proof door? The opening is only 24 inch wide and 3 foot high.

Part of the wall has 5/8 inch drywall on it and the top has this black insulated board on the top.

Do they even make a 24 inch wide by 3 foot door that is fireproof?
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Old 12-02-2012, 07:27 PM   #12
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Cellulose vs. Fiberglass Insulation in Walls to lower energy bills


Check with your local Building Dept. or Fire Marshall. The Cellotex (black board) is not fire-resistant. Sounds as if a vehicle/gasoline fire could add fumes/smoke/flames to the house, get this fixed ASAP!

Gary

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