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-   -   Blown In Cellulose Contacting Concrete (http://www.diychatroom.com/f103/blown-cellulose-contacting-concrete-150118/)

kaalapurushha 07-13-2012 09:49 AM

Blown In Cellulose Contacting Concrete
 
Hello,

I have a 'hallway' (About 3 x 10), that is actually a projection of the floor beams over the concrete garage slab. The hallway is very cold in the winter, and I recently found out that although the wally have R-13, and I have 2 layers of R-13 fiberglass at 90 degree angles in the roof, the floor has no insulation underneath the subfloor.

I am planning on replacing the floating laminate floor with something nicer, and want to fix this at the same time. I would prefer not to remove the subfloor, and there is no other way to access this area.

I was thinking that I could drill 1" holes and dense pack cellulose in the bays, then plug the holes back up. I would use a polyurethane foam underlayment for the new floor and tape the seams.

The concrete slab has no moisture issues. We are on the top of a sandy hill, and dranage is not a problem. Is this something that I can do?

Windows on Wash 07-13-2012 01:24 PM

You will need more than a 1" hole to push the cellulose but that would work.

Dense packing is not easy with the little blowers you get from Home Depot and may require a professional blower machine.

jklingel 07-13-2012 04:45 PM

Although I am not excited about using foam, this may be a good application for it. Can you get someone to spray closed cell foam through the holes, or is that too iffy? (I'd hate to hear about your floor inching up a bit from the expanding foam. Hmmm. ???) I really don't know why, but I don't like the concept of cellulose against a slab. If I did that, I would make sure that the floor above was vapor open.

Windows on Wash 07-14-2012 11:35 AM

If he went with foam, they do have lower pressure spray foam (i.e. drip foam), but the aren't cheap.

You will be much cheaper just removing the sub-floor entirely and insulating the area with rigid/spray combination.

kaalapurushha 07-17-2012 09:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Windows on Wash (Post 965464)
If he went with foam, they do have lower pressure spray foam (i.e. drip foam), but the aren't cheap.

You will be much cheaper just removing the sub-floor entirely and insulating the area with rigid/spray combination.


You mean using XPS and great stuff to seal the edges?

I was wary of removing the subfloor since I am not sure yet if it is nailed or screwed, and I am assuming that it may extend under the wall (There is a non load-bearing wall that makes a small closet.

I suppose I could just get a circular saw and make very straight cuts 6" or so from the wall?

Windows on Wash 07-18-2012 10:50 AM

By the time that you remove parts of the floor and pay a SPF contractor to fill the area, you can probably do just as good a job by removing some of the subfloor and insulating the area.

Cut the subfloor a few inches from the wall as you mentioned and go that route.


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