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Old 08-25-2013, 01:29 PM   #31
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Basement insulation options


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Originally Posted by tommyxv
I'm in Newark DE. I'm about 15 mins from the DE/MD border. My floor has been room temp.
Interesting...that's good to know. Do you have a daylight basement or are all four walls below grade? Was your floor level or did you have to lay the fabric underneath it?

As for my flooring, I'll have floating vinyl planks in the all rooms except the bathroom (tile), laundry room (tile) and home theater (carpet).

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Old 08-27-2013, 09:18 AM   #32
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Did anyone insulate interior basement walls? Is standards Kraft paper insulation okay for interior walls?
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Old 08-27-2013, 10:05 AM   #33
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Did anyone insulate interior basement walls? Is standards Kraft paper insulation okay for interior walls?
Interior basement walls can be standard paperbacked insulation. I will be using Roxul insulation personally.
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Old 08-27-2013, 12:33 PM   #34
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I love Roxul insulation in a multitude of different installation applications. That being said I would recommend you use it for a little bit before you specify it for interior walls. This stuff will make itch like crazy, be more expensive than standard fiberglass, and does not have the option of a paper facing four easy hanging in interior walls.
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Old 08-27-2013, 02:29 PM   #35
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It's one interior wall 20 ft long and and another 6 foot walls. Guess ill see how difficult it's to work with and make the call after that.
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Old 08-27-2013, 03:12 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by Windows on Wash View Post
I love Roxul insulation in a multitude of different installation applications. That being said I would recommend you use it for a little bit before you specify it for interior walls. This stuff will make itch like crazy, be more expensive than standard fiberglass, and does not have the option of a paper facing four easy hanging in interior walls.
I looked into fiberglass insulation and Roxul...after the research I did and everything I decided on Roxul due to the fire resistance, moisture resistance and sound dampening properties. Also after my rough calculations for how much insulation I needed, Roxul was only $100 more expensive than Owens Corning (see below):

Interior walls square footage: 1,034sqft
Roxul price: $724.09
Johns Manville price: $973.67
Owens Corning price: $621.08
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Old 09-05-2013, 07:04 AM   #37
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If the delta is that little, no reason not to use it.

There is not real appreciable sound attenuation benefit from the research that I have done. Ted White is the resident sound expert and he knows better but the claims that Roxul are better than fiberglass (or that the insulation inside the walls is a huge driver of performance) are questionable to say the least.
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Old 09-05-2013, 11:00 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Windows on Wash View Post
If the delta is that little, no reason not to use it.

There is not real appreciable sound attenuation benefit from the research that I have done. Ted White is the resident sound expert and he knows better but the claims that Roxul are better than fiberglass (or that the insulation inside the walls is a huge driver of performance) are questionable to say the least.
I am talking with him on AVSforums about the insulation on the interior walls...thanks for the suggestion though

My biggest hurdle right now is what to do about the concrete floor. I keep seeing different options and can't tell which would be best.

Option 1:
  • 1" XPS; glued and seams taped directly on slab
  • 2 layers of 1/2" plywood (installed with staggered seams, and with the top layer Tapcon screwed to the lower layer & concrete floor) and seams taped
  • Floating vinyl planks or engineered wood flooring; carpet in Home Theater

Option 2:
  • 1" XPS; glued and seams taped directly on slab
  • One layer of 23/32" T&G plywood Tapcon screwed to the concrete floor
  • Floating vinyl planks or engineered wood flooring; carpet in Home Theater
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Old 11-10-2013, 12:27 PM   #39
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So quick question...should I lay the subfloor (xps & 23/32" plywood) prior to framing the walls? Why or why not?
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Old 11-10-2013, 07:50 PM   #40
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Check it out. It was designed by basement insulation guys for exactly your situation.

It even has channels for the moisture.

Very quick & easy to install. It glues to wall. Rock it then installed traditionally by screwing to the built in ferring strips.

If your time is worth even $10 an hour you will ave a lot by using InSoFast.

But more importantly, it is the best solution. No mold. No holes in your blocks letting even more water in. And minimum lost room area.

http://insofast.com

InSoFast UX 2.0 provides a continuous wall of R-8.5 insulation with built-in mold-resistant framing, moisture control channels and electrical chaseways in a single, interlocking panel that's ready for drywall attachment.
The perfect solution for below-grade applications and moisture-prone environments like basements.
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Old 11-11-2013, 02:15 PM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DoodDank View Post
Check it out. It was designed by basement insulation guys for exactly your situation.

It even has channels for the moisture.

Very quick & easy to install. It glues to wall. Rock it then installed traditionally by screwing to the built in ferring strips.

If your time is worth even $10 an hour you will ave a lot by using InSoFast.

But more importantly, it is the best solution. No mold. No holes in your blocks letting even more water in. And minimum lost room area.

http://insofast.com

InSoFast UX 2.0 provides a continuous wall of R-8.5 insulation with built-in mold-resistant framing, moisture control channels and electrical chaseways in a single, interlocking panel that's ready for drywall attachment.
The perfect solution for below-grade applications and moisture-prone environments like basements.
As you brought it up on an old post for your advertising purpose, I have to retort;

"channels for the moisture"- appear to be 3/8"x3/8" cut every 3/4" apart on the back= 1-1/2" x 3/8' missing foam per foot. Double that for 2' wide= 3" x 0.375" = 1.125 sq.in. per 2' panel.

Every 2' is a wiring channel cut (missing foam/R-value again); 3/4" x 3/4" or 0.56 (1/2") x 1" deep ----- added to the back drains = total of 1-1/2" wide where the R-value is only R-4.45---- that is every 2' times a 30' wall = 1.5 x 15= 22.5" almost 2' of only R-4.4 rather than your R-9.8--- full 2" of thickness.

The channels also promote air movement dispersing any moisture vapor through the network of channels- wiring every 2' horizontally and every 16" vertically. Where foam board should be applied with a 1' square grid glue pattern- IMO, to limit air movement behind the foam board; http://joneakes.com/jons-fixit-database/743

"No holes in your blocks letting even more water in."------- the water will find a way in regardless of holes. Best to use an interior drainage (block walls) with solid foam board as bought at local stores without the huge mark-up for an inferior product;
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...,d.cGE&cad=rja

http://www.dow.com/webapps/lit/litor...0.pdf&pdf=true

Few other comparisons;

Inso. -- R-4.45 per in vs. R-5 per inch (true R-value, no thermal reduction by 50% every 2' panel for drainage).

Inso.- 3.5 perms rating vs. 1.5 or 1.1 perms for others sited. Less water per hour coming through at a slower rate- 50% slower- easier for HVAC to handle.

Inso.- 3% water intake volume vs. 0.9 % to 1.3%

Inso.- 1.25# cu.ft. density vs. 1.3- 2#

A good building inspector will catch the rated R-=4.45 per inch and product is 2" thick = R-9.8 not R-10 as most locals require- or more- what then buy more Inso. and double wall? You count the rated R-value of "continuous" footnote "c" not the inside air film= 0.68 plus the 1/2"gypsum board = R-0.45 to get code minimums; and under new codes- min. for Zone 5, 6, 7, and 8 are now R-15- redesign......http://publicecodes.cyberregs.com/ic..._11_sec002.htm

So it is all chopped up with wiring/drainage raceways that you may not even need, robbing the R-value. Much cheaper to DIY and add some 2x2 furring in front of full R-value XPS foam board as thickness varies per location. Most older concrete walls require a wood frame wall in front just to straighten them anyway, let alone the DWV lines tight alongside. More of a lazymans DIY with lacking design/R-value, IMHO.

Gary
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Last edited by Gary in WA; 11-11-2013 at 05:19 PM.
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Old 11-11-2013, 03:09 PM   #42
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Gary in WA...I already reported his post lol.

On another note, how about my question above his advertisement
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Old 11-11-2013, 05:24 PM   #43
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I reported it also as I am no longer a moderator. Yet here it sits.....

Sorry, never saw your previous question. If you ever have water in basement, easier to remove ply to dry foam without a wall on it. Just add foam board under wall plate (pt not required, check local AHJ) with continuous bead of caulking for irregularities in slab and air sealing wall as first line of defense.

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Old 11-11-2013, 08:18 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary in WA
I reported it also as I am no longer a moderator. Yet here it sits..... Sorry, never saw your previous question. If you ever have water in basement, easier to remove ply to dry foam without a wall on it. Just add foam board under wall plate (pt not required, check local AHJ) with continuous bead of caulking for irregularities in slab and air sealing wall as first line of defense. Gary
That's good to know. Yeah I'll be using 1" FB under the wall plate with adhesive in 1x1 squares (not necessary but peace of mind) and caulking on all edges .

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