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Old 09-20-2011, 01:23 PM   #1
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Another basement insulating question. To dry-loc or not?


I am redoing the basement now that the new B-Dry system is installed. I will be glueing 2" xps board directly to the cinder block walls and rim joist cavities followed by sealing all joints with tape and expanding foam. Eventually i will build a 2x4 wall in front and finish with drywall.
My question is...... Should i dry lock the interior surface of the walls before putting up the foam board? Or just glue it strait to the cinder block?

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Old 09-20-2011, 03:53 PM   #2
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Another basement insulating question. To dry-loc or not?


providing the appropriate thickness, the foam will vapor retard just as much as the paint will...

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Old 09-21-2011, 10:06 AM   #3
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Another basement insulating question. To dry-loc or not?


Glue straight to the concrete.

I would skip the paint as it will be duplicative and may interfere with the proper bond of the adhesive.
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Old 09-21-2011, 06:00 PM   #4
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Another basement insulating question. To dry-loc or not?


I agree, the Dryloc will seal the surface to negate the foam's "slowly release the stored moisture at the whole wall surface below grade to the inside over a season" and direct it elsewhere to surface (usually at the concrete wall/footing/slab area). If the wall is blocked by the vapor barrier (Dryloc), it will become saturated to maximum then leak.
Remember sill sealer under p.t. plate for air/thermal/capillary break, ADA the drywall, provide egress and pass all Building Inspections with the "paper trail" for H.O. Insurance carrier.

PS- you may be required to directly fasten the foam board mechanically- nails w. washers, etc.
Remember the required top plate and fire-stop in the foam board every 10' lineally.

Gary
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Old 09-23-2011, 07:58 PM   #5
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Another basement insulating question. To dry-loc or not?


Can you clarify the previous post for a newbie? What is the p.t. Plate and, ADA the drywall. I'm doing the same thing to my basement except my floor has radiant heat tubes so I'll be gluing not nailing. Thanks.
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Old 09-23-2011, 11:57 PM   #6
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Another basement insulating question. To dry-loc or not?


Ok so no dry loc. What about that sill sealer? Due to the drains and fresh concrete in the floor i need to use construction adhesive to secure the p.t. sill plate. Will that be enough of a thermal break?

I to would like to know what ADA the drywall means....Thanks to all for the help.
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Old 09-25-2011, 08:45 PM   #7
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Another basement insulating question. To dry-loc or not?


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Originally Posted by 1jumper View Post
Can you clarify the previous post for a newbie? What is the p.t. Plate and, ADA the drywall. I'm doing the same thing to my basement except my floor has radiant heat tubes so I'll be gluing not nailing. Thanks.
P.T. Plate: Pressure-Treated lumber should always be used for members closest to the concrete. They should be seperated from direct contact with the concrete surface by use of a sill seal (i.e. plastic sheeting, foam sill seal, etc.).

ADA Drywall: It's an acronym for a process of air sealing the drywall surfaces to minimize air movement within the wall and insulation. Stick with "Air Seal Drywall" and ditch the acronym as "ADA" in the professional realm of construction is well known as an acronym for Handicapped Accessibility requirements.
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Old 09-25-2011, 11:51 PM   #8
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Another basement insulating question. To dry-loc or not?


P.t.- pressure treated wood on a concrete slab or wall- OR an approved decay-resistant wood, as per Code--- #2 and #3: http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico...9_3_sec017.htm

A foam poly sill-sealer would air seal the wall cavity from the air leaks under the bottom plate due to irregularities in the concrete. P.t. wood is not water-proof, it will wick moisture through it; http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/...-building-code

The sill sealer would act as a thermal break stopping the warm 8’ x 60’+- wall from losing its heat to a colder concrete slab/earth below (heat sink). Poly sheeting would not thermal break though would capillary break. The poly sheeting would need continuous caulking to effectively air seal, both above and below it. Sill sealer is also a capillary break, standing alone.

ADA --- airtight drywall approach was first coined in 1986, though some trades people are still unfamiliar with the term. Sorry I didn’t give a reference site for the explanation—for those that don’t know: http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...wall-approach/

If you type “ADA drywall” in Google, it is sited a few times……

Gary
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Old 09-26-2011, 11:57 AM   #9
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Another basement insulating question. To dry-loc or not?


Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR in WA View Post
ADA --- airtight drywall approach was first coined in 1986, though some trades people are still unfamiliar with the term. If you type “ADA drywall” in Google, it is sited a few times……
I've asked a dozen professionals if they know what ADA drywall is. They all were confused because "drywall type has no effect on accessibility". Then I ask if they know what "Air Sealing Drywall" is and the rattle off the correct answer. The residential realm may know ADA as this, but in the commercial world where Handicapped Accessibility (ADA) is far more important and code required, you'll have you're clientel and contractors confused...

Notice the use of ADA:
http://www.ada.gov/stdspdf.htm
http://www.us.kohler.com/onlinecatalog/ada.jsp
http://www.grabbars.com/
http://adabasics.org/
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Old 09-26-2011, 01:22 PM   #10
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Another basement insulating question. To dry-loc or not?


So, your "dozen professionals" didn't know it...might just say something about them, wouldn't you think?

Quit splitting hairs, Whitehouse, some of us got what GBR was talking about even though you didn't. The two acronyms can coexist quite happily.
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Old 09-26-2011, 02:20 PM   #11
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Another basement insulating question. To dry-loc or not?


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Originally Posted by ccarlisle View Post
So, your "dozen professionals" didn't know it...might just say something about them, wouldn't you think?

Quit splitting hairs, Whitehouse, some of us got what GBR was talking about even though you didn't. The two acronyms can coexist quite happily.
I wouldn't question their professionalism based on one question, especially the one noted. It's pretty ignorant. Both acronyms can exist, I was only informing people that if they use the "ADA" acronym, in reference to drywall, with most commercial "professionals" then they are likely to get a few weird looks. www.ada.gov pertains to Handicapped Accessibility in construction, not air sealing. Sorry you're feelings got hurt...
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Old 09-26-2011, 11:05 PM   #12
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Another basement insulating question. To dry-loc or not?


You’ll want to send a letter to U.S. Dept. Energy, to enlighten them; http://www.energysavers.gov/your_hom.../mytopic=11310

Need more stamps; http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=...jSURd5YuEIvVog

One to the UK: http://www.encyclo.co.uk/define/Airt...ch%20%28ADA%29

One to Canada: http://www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/en/inpr/b...codemo_090.cfm

To GBA (they are just learning, also): http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/...drywall-anyone

Building “Green”; http://oikos.com/library/airsealing/...pproaches.html

In “Construction”: http://construction.about.com/od/The...l-Approach.htm

My point was this: ADA in a commercial application is as you stated. In a residential--- DIY vein, with the word drywall after it is “Airtight Drywall Approach”. Far as I know, we haven’t had very many posters asking of ADA compliance Questions here at DIYChatroom. I do remember one….. I’m trying to enlighten those interested in ADA drywall for better building practices, the goal of this Chatroom and others is helping with helpful answers. Any more concerns, feel free to PM me rather than taking up valuable time/space from us both.

Gary
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Old 09-27-2011, 12:46 PM   #13
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Another basement insulating question. To dry-loc or not?


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Originally Posted by GBR in WA View Post
the goal of this Chatroom and others is helping with helpful answers.
Whoa big spender! I concurred that both acronym's do co-exist if you read. And I find that providing the understanding of the "double standard" of the acronym would help should the DIY'er be faced with a confused professional. Sorry?
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Old 10-22-2011, 10:53 AM   #14
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Another basement insulating question. To dry-loc or not?


Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR in WA
I agree, the Dryloc will seal the surface to negate the foam's "slowly release the stored moisture at the whole wall surface below grade to the inside over a season" and direct it elsewhere to surface (usually at the concrete wall/footing/slab area). If the wall is blocked by the vapor barrier (Dryloc), it will become saturated to maximum then leak.
Remember sill sealer under p.t. plate for air/thermal/capillary break, ADA the drywall, provide egress and pass all Building Inspections with the "paper trail" for H.O. Insurance carrier.

PS- you may be required to directly fasten the foam board mechanically- nails w. washers, etc.
Remember the required top plate and fire-stop in the foam board every 10' lineally.

Gary
What does the fire stop entail?
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Old 10-26-2011, 11:15 PM   #15
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Another basement insulating question. To dry-loc or not?


http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico...002_par031.htm

http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico...002_par032.htm

Gary

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