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Old 05-23-2013, 10:23 AM   #1
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Sweet Corn and Field Corn


We live on a few acres surrounded by field. This year there is corn going in all around us. We thought about planting a few rows (small patch) of sweet corn for our family. The farmer that farms the land around us said that planting sweet corn will cause problems for them. Is this true? I find it hard to believe that this would cause problems. He seemed like the kind of guy that just likes to tell people what to do. Any suggestions?

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Old 05-23-2013, 10:41 AM   #2
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Sweet Corn and Field Corn


He is right. But it will cause problems for both of you...mostly you.

Field corn makes up about 98-99% of corn production. It's used for livestock feed, ethanol...basically everything involving corn. Sweet corn is what we eat.

When the corn pollinates, depending on which one pollinates first, the other will be affected. Chances are it would make your cord not so sweet.

Some farmers do plant both...but they tend to keep them separate.

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Old 05-23-2013, 10:46 AM   #3
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Sweet Corn and Field Corn


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He is right. But it will cause problems for both of you...mostly you.

Field corn makes up about 98-99% of corn production. It's used for livestock feed, ethanol...basically everything involving corn. Sweet corn is what we eat.

When the corn pollinates, depending on which one pollinates first, the other will be affected. Chances are it would make your cord not so sweet.

Some farmers do plant both...but they tend to keep them separate.
Yes, so I realize when each variety pollinates would determine how much the corn would be affected, but what if there's 50-60 ft of space between the two types. Would this diminish or eliminate any cross pollination?
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Old 05-23-2013, 10:47 AM   #4
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Sweet Corn and Field Corn


I am surrounded by corn fields, field corn. The fields surround my property. I plant sweet corn in my garden which is approximately 40-50 yds from the field corn. No problem, in fact the farmer gave me the sweet corn to plant. I also have farmer friends that plant 6-20 rows of sweet corn right next to their field corn so I don't think it would cause any problems for your farmer. I live in west central Wis...field corn is planted much earlier than sweet corn; sweet corn needs warmer soil/temperature and usually the pollination is done for the field corn by the time the sweet corn is pollinating...he may be worried about cross pollination but it is more the other way around and I don't think a few rows of sweet corn would cause any need of concern..."Different varieties of corn planted near one another will pollinate each other, potentially passing on characteristics not normally present. For example, if you plant sweet corn near field corn, your sweet corn may have less sweetness and more starchiness. Leaving at least 250 feet between different types of corn reduces cross-pollination. (http://homeguides.sfgate.com/problem...orn-22482.html)"
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Old 05-23-2013, 10:52 AM   #5
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Sweet Corn and Field Corn


The key is distance and planting time. Like nr noted...you plant the sweet corn a lot later....

Field corn takes longer because they leave it on the stalk to dry out a bit.
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Old 05-23-2013, 01:26 PM   #6
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Sweet Corn and Field Corn


Thanks for the info. I believe like most fields, the crops are rotated from year to year, so I can always plant sweet corn every other year. I guess I was just a bit offended that someone would tell me what I could and couldn't do on my property. If I want sweet corn, I'll plant it is what I thought. Out of respect, I probably won't plant any this year, but I'm sure not going to say I never will just because a few ears of corn might cross pollinate. I mean I'd be sewing roughly 30-40 seeds of sweet corn to his 150 acres of seed corn/field corn.

On a side note, this year because of a cool/wet spring the corn was planted last weekend. They will be detasseling mid July. If I were to plant sweet corn right now, I'd be harvesting sometime early to mid August.

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Old 05-23-2013, 05:05 PM   #7
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Sweet Corn and Field Corn


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Originally Posted by cibula11 View Post
We live on a few acres surrounded by field. This year there is corn going in all around us. We thought about planting a few rows (small patch) of sweet corn for our family. The farmer that farms the land around us said that planting sweet corn will cause problems for them. Is this true? I find it hard to believe that this would cause problems. He seemed like the kind of guy that just likes to tell people what to do. Any suggestions?

I say, if the farmer is worried about it, then he shouldn't plant near your lot.
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Old 05-24-2013, 08:52 AM   #8
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Sweet Corn and Field Corn


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I say, if the farmer is worried about it, then he shouldn't plant near your lot.
Yes, I agree. This was my initial thought . I realize he has probably been farming that land for decades and I don't want to damage the relationship I have with him, but certainly am not going to be told what plant on my property.
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Old 05-25-2013, 07:39 AM   #9
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Sweet Corn and Field Corn


Think about something else for a second. If you had to package a ring to remind your wife you loved her? How would you do it? Box, nice wrapping paper, ribbon and so forth.

If you were a computer nerd, how would you package say intellectual property having to do with new software? On a disc, or downloadable from a site somewhere right?

How would you package a plant patent? The only packaging available is seed. And when you drive around seeing those seed company signs you are seeing that whatever company has contracted with the farmer to grow not only corn we cannot eat directly but the next GMO generation of it. You render the crop yield to the farmer questionable if there is any chance you planted so much as one sweet corn plant that did not match the GMO seed he planted.

Corn in this country is out of control. We can buy roughage cheaper than growing it and subsidiizing the losses for ethanol. We waste this country's largest and most productive farmland on crops that cannot be eaten without post processing. And excuse me, we do eat them as high carbohydrates in corn syrups. You cannot find much with other sweeteners in them these days. Don't believe me, just look at some labels today and then we can talk about obesity and type 2 diabetes in young ones too. We feed corn to cattle that were never built to eat corn and compensate with antibiotics. 67 percent of antibiotics sold in this country last year were sold to the ag industry---most to keep livestock eating the wrong stuff from getting too noticeably sick. We wonder why even Superman died of non-healing, and antibiotic resistant bed sores.

Your farmer had to sign a contract stating, to the best of his knowledge, someone like you was not going to plant legacy sweet corn seeds anywhere near. It is your land, you can do what you want. You render part of his seed crop worthless if you do.


Last edited by user1007; 05-25-2013 at 07:43 AM.
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