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Old 06-07-2013, 06:01 PM   #1
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A little garden how-to


Here is how I make a new bed, or rather an existing one bigger to accomodate a Japanese lillac that has grown too big for its current spot.

Using a half moon edger, cut the shape you like. Cut across to make managable pieces.

Using a garden or pitch fork, lift up the pieces of sod. Dump the contents of the wheelbarrow into the neighbours yard (in my case the farmers field. I don't know your neighbour, their reaction is not my problem)

Dig a hole twice the size of the expected root ball of the newcomer or the transplantee.

Do not use a the hoe..never use the hoe..they are just trouble..especially the not fat ones. Stick with the good old garden fork

Here are some photos of the subject shrub. It needs to be moved, its crowding out the solomon seal and the hosta. Another reason to research the expected mature size of your new plantings
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Last edited by creeper; 06-07-2013 at 06:20 PM.
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Old 06-07-2013, 06:10 PM   #2
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Whatever you do try not to move your shrub when its in full flower...its an added stress

Plop the plant into the new hole that you have partially refilled with compost.

Fill all the way so the soil around the shrub is the same level as the previous.

push down on the soil to eliminate any air pockets. Water

Done
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Old 06-10-2013, 11:27 AM   #3
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Very helpful info. Many ppl are afraid to transplant things. I thought shrubs needed to be cut back when transplanted to compensate for the loss of roots?

Your yard is beautiful. I'd guess you're up in the NE. I like how you put pavers down on top of gravel. You're lucky to have such good soil.

I try not to buy many tools but think I could use a half moon edger and a pitch fork. thanks.

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Old 06-10-2013, 11:45 AM   #4
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A little garden how-to


Thanks for the compliments. I'm north but not far east..1 hour north/east of Toronto to be exact.

That small path is just a simple little thing. Hard to tell from the distant picture but those pavers are laid directly on landscape fabric and small river rock poured around them.

A garden fork is the most used tool in my garden. I never turn soil completely over..not even in the veg patch. Just plunge and lift to loosen weed roots and yank by hand

In the fall I do dig a pit in the veg patch and all the summer flower scraps get tossed in there. And then a small layer of soil on top. Since they don't start to decompose in the frozen north until the next planting season starts again, I just plant seeds right on top without turning that pit over.

Works for me
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Old 06-10-2013, 11:55 AM   #5
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Man...I wish my soil looked like that.....try digging in clay adobe......
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Old 06-10-2013, 12:00 PM   #6
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A little garden how-to


You can see the native topsoil as the hunks of sod is being torn off. Its all clay in my area. This spring /summer has been very wet, making the sod easy to slice through.

In July and August one would need a jackhammer to get through.

Some of the beds in particular the veg patch is pure horse barn muckout. .... Black gold

I once grew sunflowers 12 feet high with flower heads bigger than a large dinner plate
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Old 06-10-2013, 12:04 PM   #7
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Sun Flowers? Reminds me of one time driving through Winnipeg one late summer....back side of the airport....2 miles of fields of sunflowers....gorgeous....
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Old 06-10-2013, 12:17 PM   #8
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I remember once as a child coming across a field of sunflowers and eating whatever the birds hadn't gotten first. I also remember the stomach ache that night
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Old 06-10-2013, 12:20 PM   #9
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I remember once as a child coming across a field of sunflowers and eating whatever the birds hadn't gotten first. I also remember the stomach ache that night
Yep.....that is about how it looked.
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Old 06-10-2013, 12:48 PM   #10
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Here is a photo taken just now of some sunflowers in my veg patch. The three plants in the foreground. The idea is that the cucumber will climb up the stalks
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Old 06-10-2013, 01:37 PM   #11
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I put landscape fabric down, from Home Depot, then mulch, but weeds grow thru it anyway. Then the weeds are hard to pull up and rip the fabric. Maybe I should look at the nursery for better fabric?

Another problem I have is with all the planting I'm doing in my new house, I have piles of dirt and no place on my city lot to put it.
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Old 06-10-2013, 02:07 PM   #12
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My experience with fabric has had mixed results. In the last picture , the one with the stairs everything to the left of the giant hostas has landscape fabric underneath. Then a very thick layer of mulch.

Its not that the weeds grow up through the fabric, but rather new seeds land and take root in the mulch and fabric. I find those ones easy to yank out in comparison to ones straight in the ground.
Maybe a better quality fabric will work.

I've also made gardens using cardboard then mulch. Then Idea being I didn't have to rip out the sod first. Everything will decompose over time anyway
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Old 06-10-2013, 02:23 PM   #13
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My experience with fabric has had mixed results. In the last picture , the one with the stairs everything to the left of the giant hostas has landscape fabric underneath. Then a very thick layer of mulch.

Its not that the weeds grow up through the fabric, but rather new seeds land and take root in the mulch and fabric. I find those ones easy to yank out in comparison to ones straight in the ground.
Maybe a better quality fabric will work.

I've also made gardens using cardboard then mulch. Then Idea being I didn't have to rip out the sod first. Everything will decompose over time anyway
That is exactly what is happening. I have a patio done with pavers....4" of crushed stone...2" of sand....then the 4" thick pavers...I'm always pulling out weeds...but they are shallow...just growing between the pavers....
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Old 06-10-2013, 03:04 PM   #14
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I put landscape fabric down, from Home Depot, then mulch, but weeds grow thru it anyway. Then the weeds are hard to pull up and rip the fabric. Maybe I should look at the nursery for better fabric?

Another problem I have is with all the planting I'm doing in my new house, I have piles of dirt and no place on my city lot to put it.
I remember seeing pictures of your place in other threads. You can get creative and get rid of the extra soil quite easily.

You could spread thinly on the exisiting lawn and overseed. A couple of good Floridian rains and it will not even be noticed.

You could use it to fill any low spots or dips on the lawn

You could make a berm or raised garden without the use of borders. (most of mine look like that)

Raise the areas close to the foundation to prevent any future drainage problems

Or give it to the neighbourbour who is a pain in the arse. Stake a sign on his lawn that says "FILL WANTED" and then claim that you thought he wanted it.
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Old 06-11-2013, 06:30 AM   #15
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LOL. That started my day with a laugh! I do have a few low spots so I'll try adding it there.

Is that a white Birch in your yard? They were always a favorite of mine, but I've never lived in the right zone for them.

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