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Old 08-17-2014, 08:47 PM   #1
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Freeze home made ketshup?


We made some ketchup from the roma ect. tomatoes and onions from the garden.
Used a recipe loosely based off a Vitamix recipe found on the internet ( our Vitamix book didn't list one).
Anywho it tastes good and and I want to make more and freeze it.
The recipe says good for up to 3 weeks in the refrigerator..nothing about freezing was said in the recipe .

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Old 08-17-2014, 09:44 PM   #2
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Freeze home made ketshup?


xxxxxxxxxxxx sure xxxxxxxxxxxx

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Old 08-17-2014, 09:53 PM   #3
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Freeze home made ketshup?


Do you cook it? What about canning it?
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Old 08-17-2014, 10:27 PM   #4
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Freeze home made ketshup?


Yes it is cooked down for 1.25 hrs then pulverized in the vitamix for about a minute.
Don't really want to can as of yet ...plenty of freezer space for the small amount I'm planning( maybe 8 pints).
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Old 08-17-2014, 11:01 PM   #5
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Freeze home made ketshup?


If you are cooking the liquid, then canning isn't that much harder. Of course, many people with disagree with this method, it's what my grandmother and mother always used. Simply put the jars and lids in the dishwasher to get them nice and hot. Then take your hot liquid and pour it into the jars. Tighten the lids, put them in a place where there are no drafts or blowing air to let them cool. While cooling, the lids will pop down, and you're done. Canned many hundreds of jars of tomatoes this way.
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Old 08-18-2014, 02:02 AM   #6
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Freeze home made ketshup?


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Originally Posted by taylorjm View Post
If you are cooking the liquid, then canning isn't that much harder. Of course, many people with disagree with this method, it's what my grandmother and mother always used. Simply put the jars and lids in the dishwasher to get them nice and hot. Then take your hot liquid and pour it into the jars. Tighten the lids, put them in a place where there are no drafts or blowing air to let them cool. While cooling, the lids will pop down, and you're done. Canned many hundreds of jars of tomatoes this way.
Wow.. and you're still alive?? Some things still surprise me.

What you have described here is a perfect recipe and home for botulism poisoning.. The botulism toxin is something like 100,000 times more toxic than Sarin Gas.. This is nasty stuff.

With the amount of vinegar in Ketchup, I would venture a guess that the pH is low enough for a normal 45 minute water bath canning process to do the job sufficiently and kill any botulism spores.
That said, I use a pressure cooker on everything. Above a pH of around 4.5 and the botulism spores can survive at temperatures above the boiling point of water. Pressure canning is the only solution other than lowering the pH.

Hope that helps,
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Old 08-18-2014, 10:52 AM   #7
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Wow.. and you're still alive?? Some things still surprise me.

What you have described here is a perfect recipe and home for botulism poisoning.. The botulism toxin is something like 100,000 times more toxic than Sarin Gas.. This is nasty stuff.

With the amount of vinegar in Ketchup, I would venture a guess that the pH is low enough for a normal 45 minute water bath canning process to do the job sufficiently and kill any botulism spores.
That said, I use a pressure cooker on everything. Above a pH of around 4.5 and the botulism spores can survive at temperatures above the boiling point of water. Pressure canning is the only solution other than lowering the pH.

Hope that helps,
What temperature does the canning process take the containers and their ingredients to, and maintain that temperature for what length of time, that's necessary to kill all the spores ?
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Old 08-18-2014, 11:06 AM   #8
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Freeze home made ketshup?


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Originally Posted by PaulBob View Post
Wow.. and you're still alive?? Some things still surprise me.

What you have described here is a perfect recipe and home for botulism poisoning.. The botulism toxin is something like 100,000 times more toxic than Sarin Gas.. This is nasty stuff.

With the amount of vinegar in Ketchup, I would venture a guess that the pH is low enough for a normal 45 minute water bath canning process to do the job sufficiently and kill any botulism spores.
That said, I use a pressure cooker on everything. Above a pH of around 4.5 and the botulism spores can survive at temperatures above the boiling point of water. Pressure canning is the only solution other than lowering the pH.

Hope that helps,
This is a tiny bit dramatic. Botulism is extremely rare, and nearly every canning guide you follow will tell you to boil the jars for five minutes and you're fine.

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Between 1990 and 2000, the Centers for Disease Control reported 263 individual cases from 160 foodborne botulism events in the United States with a case-fatality rate of 4%. Thirty-nine percent (103 cases and 58 events) occurred in Alaska, all of which were attributable to traditional Alaska aboriginal foods. In the lower 49 states, home-canned food was implicated in 70 (91%) events with canned asparagus being the most numerous cause.
I mean, you should certainly be careful and prepare, but it's still really hard to get.
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Old 08-18-2014, 12:34 PM   #9
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What temperature does the canning process take the containers and their ingredients to, and maintain that temperature for what length of time, that's necessary to kill all the spores ?
240 DegF to kill the spores..

The stuff you buy in cans at the grocery store has been cooked at a temperature high enough for the contents to reach 250 deg for 3 minutes.. (got that bit from wiki)..

If you want to truly be safe from bad canning practices, get a pressure cooker.. The best brand is "All American".. They don't have seals so nothing to wear out.. I bought one and I absolutely love it. I can meats and fish, vegetables, fruits, etc.. We put all the ingredients for beef stew into a large boiling pot and get it almost to the point of boiling.. Then we scoop the stuff out into 1 quart jars and can it in the cooker.. It cooks while canning.. We have jars in the basement that are 6 years old and taste like we just canned them yesterday.

Water bath canning ONLY works for foods that are very acidic... That used to mean tomatoes but todays hybrid tomatoes are not as acidic as they used to be so you have to add things like lemon juice or other acids to bring down the pH to a point (4.5) that kills the botulism spores at a lower temperature.
For canning mixes like beef stew that contains meat and potatoes and onions and stuff, adding acid won't work.. They must be canned in a pressure cooker.
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Old 08-18-2014, 12:43 PM   #10
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This is a tiny bit dramatic. Botulism is extremely rare, and nearly every canning guide you follow will tell you to boil the jars for five minutes and you're fine.
LOL.. boil the jars for five minutes are you're done?? Are you serious or being sarcastic or something? Or are you referring to killing the toxin while preparing dinner? In other words, after your jars have been in storage for a year or whatever, you open one to use it and you need to boil the contents before eating it... Then yes,, that is true.. But it is also true that you're going to also destroy much of the texture and flavor by boiling it again... not to mention the loss of nutrients...

I can pop open any one of my jars after several years and eat the contents without any further treatment and I'm perfectly safe.

Botulism spores are found naturally in the soil and are very common.. Put them into a poorly prepared jar of canned food and they'll sprout and grow quite nicely.

Cases of botulism poisoning are rare these days because of industry and world wide manufacturing standards for canned goods.. Combine that with a gazillion web pages telling people how to can things properly and the number of poisoning cases have fallen.


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I mean, you should certainly be careful and prepare, but it's still really hard to get.
It is quite easy to get poisoned if you don't prepare properly... Hard to get if you do it right...
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Old 08-18-2014, 01:01 PM   #11
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Freeze home made ketshup?


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LOL.. boil the jars for five minutes are you're done?? Are you serious or being sarcastic or something?
Don't be a jerk. I've only ever made fruit jams, and yes, you boil them for five to ten minutes and you're done. Even according to the USDA.

http://nchfp.uga.edu/publications/us...Home%20Can.pdf

I see from that site that tomato products are much different, which is why you should never take advice from people like me on the Internet.

http://nchfp.uga.edu/publications/us...Home%20Can.pdf

Just follow the instructions that come with any canning service and you'll be fine, no need to be dramatic.

Last edited by TheBobmanNH; 08-18-2014 at 01:07 PM.
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Old 08-18-2014, 01:24 PM   #12
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Don't be a jerk. I've only ever made fruit jams, and yes, you boil them for five to ten minutes and you're done. Even according to the USDA.
Sorry.. I really didn't meant to be a jerk.. its just came out that way.
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Old 08-18-2014, 01:37 PM   #13
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Sorry.. I really didn't meant to be a jerk.. its just came out that way.
Eh, it's the Internet, it makes 80% of what I type come off like I'm a jerk, when really I'm only a jerk 50% of the time.
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Old 08-18-2014, 09:52 PM   #14
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Freeze home made ketshup?


Thanks for the spirited reply's... heh heh
Good thing we're only talking ketchup here.
Going to freeze it this year.
Canning does hold my interest and maybe next year I'll get a pressure cooker.
I know canning takes specific methods and little deviation from proven recipe's.
As kids we helped our parents water bath can but that's been eons ago.
Good skills to relearn and pass on and in the mean time enjoy the fruits of our labor.
Have given so much away over the years as the wife has not always been fully on board but she's coming around.
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Old 08-18-2014, 10:47 PM   #15
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Freeze home made ketshup?


So care to share your ketchup recipe? I prefer to make things from scratch verses the processed stuff that you have no idea what's really in it.

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