Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Landscaping & Lawn Care > Gardening Forum

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-15-2014, 12:29 PM   #1
Member
 
Wench's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Michigan
Posts: 104
Share |
Default

Arborvitaes


We just bought and put in 8 Arborvitaes, when I look at them they don't look that great, they look a little wild with branches going all over. Is that because they are new? My neighbors look nicer and uniform, but they have been in for years.Arborvitaes-image.jpg

Wench is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2014, 01:36 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Southeastern MA
Posts: 1,350
Default

Arborvitaes


They will fill out. Hard to tell by the photo but the look like they are planted too close together and too close to the fence. Arborvitae can get really tall and wide.

Last year I removed 6 that we planted next to my house. They were 15 feet tall and at least 6 feet in diameter in the base. I got rid of them because they were splitting apart from snow.

__________________
Dan
djlandkpl is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2014, 02:24 PM   #3
Member
 
Wench's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Michigan
Posts: 104
Default

Arborvitaes


There are different types of arborvititaes, some grow fast and up to 50 feet and get over 10 feet wide. The type we bought are slow growing and get 8 to 10 feet tall and 3 to 4 feet wide. We planted ours about a foot and a half to 2 feet from the fence and 3 feet (maybe a little less??) apart. We want them to grow together to make a living privacy fence.
Wench is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2014, 06:01 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Saginaw, Michigan
Posts: 325
Default

Arborvitaes


There are different types. They type you have will always look that way unless you trim them up occasional. The type your neighbor has is different. I have both types.
taylorjm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2014, 07:21 PM   #5
Member
 
Indepspirit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Southern California
Posts: 144
Default

Arborvitaes


Yes it's because they are new but that's a good thing for you. They will look most attractive if trained from a young age to develop a strong main leader.

Select the strongest branch near the top of the arborvitae that is growing vertically or nearly vertically and designate it the leader. Cut off shots that are growing upright and could potentially compete with the main leader. This is most easily done in late winter or early spring when the major annual shaping is performed but you can remove vigorous vertical shoots from near the top of the arborvitae as soon as they are noticed if they are threatening the dominance of the main leader. Arborvitaes are sometimes trained to have multiple leaders. Allow no more than three leaders and tie them together, if desired, for additional strength and a larger or denser appearance at the top of the tree.

Prune the arborvitae so it achieves or retains the desired columnar or pyramidal form. Imagine a "perimeter line" that extends between the leader and the base of the tree that essentially outlines the desired form. Within this line, cut back vertically-oriented shoots to a larger horizontal branch or the main stem. Prune back horizontal branches that reach beyond the line, cutting them back to a branch junction or bud within the perimeter line.

Tie up a strong but flexible lateral branch so it is oriented vertically if no upright branches exist at the top of the arborvitae. For small trees, you may have to place a splint or stick against the trunk so it extends above the tree and tie the main leader to it.

Provide the arborvitae with care following pruning to encourage recovery and healthy but not overly-vigorous growth. Avoid the application of excessive nitrogen fertilizer that forces the development of rapidly-growing, vertical shoots. Remove dead or diseased branches on the arborvitae as they appear. Also prune off portions of the tree that are heavily infested with aphids, scales or other pests.

Never prune off more than 20 percent of an arborvitae or remove sections of branches near enough the trunk that no green growth exists on the remaining portion of the branch, as this leaves unsightly bare spots on the specimen.
Indepspirit is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Indepspirit For This Useful Post:
Wench (05-15-2014)
Old 05-15-2014, 08:40 PM   #6
Member
 
Wench's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Michigan
Posts: 104
Default

Arborvitaes


Because I just put them in would this fall be to early to prune them? Thanks for all the advice, one of my neighbors has several arborvitae's that are about 25 30 feet high and are grown together but when you look at the top of them some of the have 3 or 4 tips at the top of one now I know how that happened. My other neighbor has only 2, he put his in about 3 years ago and hasn't done anything to them and they look perfect, maybe he has a different type. I will have to look closer, maybe it isn't an arborvitae???? I was hoping I could shape them but wasn't sure if it would hurt them, I can wait until next year if it's safer for them because of the transplant.
Wench is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2014, 07:11 AM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Saginaw, Michigan
Posts: 325
Default

Arborvitaes


Around here the type you bought are called swamp cedars. The more shaped, neater ones are the pyramidal arborvitaes, or some other type. My neighbor has those as a border and they are beautiful. We have the swamp cedars and there's definitely a difference. I see you are in Michigan, so you probably heard of a swamp cedar before. Those will get huge if you let them.
taylorjm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2014, 07:35 AM   #8
Member
 
Wench's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Michigan
Posts: 104
Default

Arborvitaes


I've never heard of swamp cedars, but the name sounds awful. I looked them up and don't think that's what they are...at least I hope not they get huge the tags on mine said they were Emerald Green, I looked at other places that had Emerald Green and they looked like mine......unless "Emerald Green" also means swamp cedars.
Wench is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2014, 09:19 AM   #9
Member
 
Indepspirit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Southern California
Posts: 144
Default

Arborvitaes


Quote:
Originally Posted by Wench View Post
Because I just put them in would this fall be to early to prune them? Thanks for all the advice, one of my neighbors has several arborvitae's that are about 25 30 feet high and are grown together but when you look at the top of them some of the have 3 or 4 tips at the top of one now I know how that happened. My other neighbor has only 2, he put his in about 3 years ago and hasn't done anything to them and they look perfect, maybe he has a different type. I will have to look closer, maybe it isn't an arborvitae???? I was hoping I could shape them but wasn't sure if it would hurt them, I can wait until next year if it's safer for them because of the transplant.
You can start pruning them late fall -- about December -- if you like. Trim in late fall, when there is little or no chance of a late warm spell to force new growth. Fresh growth will be damaged by winter temperatures and winds.
Indepspirit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2014, 11:32 AM   #10
Member
 
Wench's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Michigan
Posts: 104
Default

Arborvitaes


Michigan's late fall is mid October, by December it's cold and have snow....I'm not lucky enough to live in a warmer climate. If we have another winter lake last years I think I will start looking for a warmer climate to live in.
Wench is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2014, 11:43 AM   #11
Member
 
PoleCat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Dayton, Ohio
Posts: 1,348
Default

Arborvitaes


If you want them to grow together do not prune them. I have the same variety and they will expand to meet each other. It is important to keep snow loads off of them when they get heavy.
__________________
"Ask me anything. If I don't know the answer I'll make something up."
PoleCat is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2014, 12:24 PM   #12
Member
 
Indepspirit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Southern California
Posts: 144
Default

Arborvitaes


A couple of tricks can be used before winter to help minimize winter damage. Don't baby arborvitaes with perpetual watering right up to freeze-up and do not fertilize the plants any more than absolutely necessary. The objective is to get them "conditioned" for the winter by slowing or stopping cell growth, getting the cell protoplasm more viscous and less apt to be lost to winter desiccation.

Instead of pruning in fall take some wooden stakes and build an open-top tepee around the arborvitae. Build it along the side of the plant (usually on the south or west side) to intercept the direct rays of the sun from raising the foliage temperature to the point of causing transpiration( water movement through a plant and its evaporation). Arborvitaes are native to North America and established ones put up with the continent's worst weather and barely shed a single bit of foliage. Most people simply keep them too soft. After August additional water is not applied to mine. If it rains, so be it. By that time, the arborvitae is reading the shortening days and beginning to close down physiologically for winter. Many people "confuse" these plants by attempting to over-water and using those blasted fertilizer spikes.

Indepspirit is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Planting Emerald Green Arborvitaes zephed666 Landscaping & Lawn Care 2 04-19-2011 06:28 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.