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-   -   What's the "Butt" and "Rail?" (http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/whats-butt-rail-61907/)

TomBrooklyn 01-15-2010 03:30 AM

What's the "Butt" and "Rail?"
 
What is meant by the "butt" and "rail" edges of a sheet of drywall?

rocketdoctor 01-15-2010 02:57 PM

the butt is the tapered side of the drywall, that allows it to be butted to another sheet of drywall this allows room for you to tape and mud easier. In most cases the butt joints run vertical around the wall. The rail is the end that is not tapered generally these are fastened to the floor and cieling.

Willie T 01-15-2010 03:54 PM

I'm willing to be wrong, but I have always known it to be just the opposite of that. The butt has always been the 4 foot end to me.

ARI001 01-15-2010 04:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Willie T (Post 383422)
I'm willing to be wrong, but I have always known it to be just the opposite of that. The butt has always been the 4 foot end to me.

:thumbsup:
Same concept as a stile and rail.

rocketdoctor 01-15-2010 04:37 PM

I am no expert so I could be wrong, I just assume the butt end is called that since its meant to be butted to the other drywalls and the rail end is where you would place a chair rail. I was really curious about this before I posted originally and searched around for the official definitions and couldn't find anything except for one post that said you should only nail the rail ends, so thats where I figured its the 4' section.

Michael Thomas 01-15-2010 05:45 PM

Did you see the terms in a written context? If so, where?

user1007 01-15-2010 08:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Willie T (Post 383422)
I'm willing to be wrong, but I have always known it to be just the opposite of that. The butt has always been the 4 foot end to me.

Me too. Maybe I have had it all 90 degrees wrong for years. No wonder my layouts suck and I spend so much on the stuff, tape and mud.

Scuba_Dave 01-15-2010 08:17 PM

Butt ends are the 4' non-tapered ends
Butt joints are the ones that need a special mudding tool to blend them in
A simple google search will explain this, never known a man not too look for butt on the Internet :lol:
The tool is curved slightly to form a joint over the butt joints

http://www.diytools.co.uk/diy/Images...696_128848.jpg http://images.meredith.com/diy/image...CTC_108_04.jpg

http://www.tape-finish-texture-drywa...g_drywall.html




http://www.tape-finish-texture-drywa...buttjoint1.jpg Butt Joint


http://www.tape-finish-texture-drywa...toryjoint1.jpg Recessed Joint


http://media.rd.com/dynamic/24/21/02...ps_002_sz2.jpg

Michael Thomas 01-15-2010 09:05 PM

But , where does "rail" come from?

user1007 01-15-2010 10:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Michael Thomas (Post 383615)
But , where does "rail" come from?

Who cares. It refers to the long edges of the sheets.

Ron Franck 01-16-2010 01:20 AM

You can make finishing your butt joints easier and flatter by using a butt board. Let's see how many questions that statement creates.......:jester:

oldrivers 01-17-2010 02:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Michael Thomas (Post 383615)
But , where does "rail" come from?


think of studs and trusses like long train tracks- rails , then think of drywall as the cars , if you put the drywall parrell to the rails studs trusses like a train car its called railroading. such as standing up sheets , its bad to railroad ceiling sheets so dont do it , it needs extra framing.

Willie T 01-17-2010 08:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ron Franck (Post 383748)
You can make finishing your butt joints easier and flatter by using a butt board. Let's see how many questions that statement creates.......:jester:

I LOVE them... especially on ceilings.

Thurman 01-17-2010 12:02 PM

With all due respect to everyone, and to the drywall tradesmen in different areas, I have never (in this area) seen drywall hung as the man in the picture is doing around here. He is hanging the sheet vertically, whereas the sheets on the other side of the wall studs appear to be hung horizontally, as we do around here. We start at the top working down, and stagger the sheets. I was taught that by hanging the sheets perpendicular to the framing, this would make a stronger wall. Is this a regional thing, or a tradesman's preference? Thanks, David

Ron Franck 01-17-2010 08:22 PM

I'm not a tradesman but I have done my homework. In most cases drywall that is hung on the wall is hung horizontally. Yes, you end up with butt joints (commonly called 'bastard joint' by the finishers) but many can be eliminated by using 12' board lengths. If you are totally adverse to finishing butt joints then, by all means, incorporate a butt board and place the butt joint between the framing rather than on it. It creates a recess just like an edge joint.
Gypsum board does have a grain to it and it is stronger along it's length, weaker across it's width. That's why it's hung on a ceiling perpendicular to the rafters. Doing the same on walls should therefore make the application stronger as opposed to placing the board vertically. It also places the tapered joint at waist level and the finishers love you for it. On the other hand, if your layout is such that you can place your board vertically and eliminate butt joints altogether and you or your finisher don't object to mudding the joint from floor to ceiling, then that is your preference. There really is no right or wrong on walls, but simply what works best for your situation or what happens to be customary for your rock men.
As for the guy in the picture, I doubt he's really a pro, but rather just some actor they used for the photo. No respectable tradesman would carry a framing hammer on his tool belt..........
JMTCW,
Ron


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