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Old 04-01-2010, 10:37 AM   #1
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What type of drywall for garage


I need to redo a wall in my garage that is drywalled right now, but I have to rip it out for some remodeling that is going on and to insulate the wall the one side is inside the house and a heated side the part in the garage is cold and unheated, but for some reason they didnt insulate this wall and the room inside is very cold in the winter inside the warm zone... but anyways... what is the best type of drywall to use? the garge gets very hot in the winter (100 degrees usually) and very cold in the winter (freezing and below almost constantly)... normal drywall? or water resistant stuff / mold resistant due to the massive humidity changes the garage goes through? also what thickness is good for this part since it is a wall that goes into the actual living space?

the walls are 2x6 stud walls that I am going to insulate with R-19 at the minimum (R22 if I can find it) right now it has 1/2" drywall on both sides... but should it be thicker to help block out some garage noise? or better fire barrier? what are your suggestions before I buy the wrong stuff... thanks!

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Old 04-01-2010, 08:49 PM   #2
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What type of drywall for garage


Code here would be 5/8 " Fireguard for the garage side of that wall.
Stagger the joints by a minimum of 8" for a second layer to get a better fire rating.

Taped plus 2 coats of mud to allow for a proper fire rating.

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Old 04-02-2010, 04:56 PM   #3
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What type of drywall for garage


Usually in a residential setting, one layer of 5/8" is normally used on the common wall(s) and ceiling of the garage. As stated above, two layers would give a better fire rating and would help with noise transmission to some extent. Check local code to see if this is applicable in your situation. If it's the wall where your entry door is, you'll have to extend the jamb on the door to compensate if you use an extra layer.
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Old 04-02-2010, 05:12 PM   #4
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What type of drywall for garage


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Code here would be 5/8 " Fireguard for the garage side of that wall.
Stagger the joints by a minimum of 8" for a second layer to get a better fire rating.

Taped plus 2 coats of mud to allow for a proper fire rating.
You (probably) meant "Joists"! (Intending to say) "Stagger the Joists... By a minimum of 8" (instead of the standard 16"!)
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Old 04-02-2010, 05:15 PM   #5
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What type of drywall for garage


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Usually in a residential setting, one layer of 5/8" is normally used on the common wall(s) and ceiling of the garage. As stated above, two layers would give a better fire rating and would help with noise transmission to some extent. Check local code to see if this is applicable in your situation. If it's the wall where your entry door is, you'll have to extend the jamb on the door to compensate if you use an extra layer.
I doubt if 2 layers of 5/8" sheetrock is safe to install on a ceiling without special reinforcements (i.e. framing?)!
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Old 04-02-2010, 06:28 PM   #6
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What type of drywall for garage


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You (probably) meant "Joists"! (Intending to say) "Stagger the Joists... By a minimum of 8" (instead of the standard 16"!)
I'm sure he meant joints. When double layering drywall for firecode, the joints must be staggered between layers.
I doubt the weight of 2 layers of 5/8" firecode would be an issue on the ceiling, but certainly worth checking into (again) with local code officials. It's pretty much overkill, but something the OP queried about. In many locales, 1/2" is perfectly acceptable.
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Old 04-02-2010, 06:57 PM   #7
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What type of drywall for garage


poster said wall
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Old 04-02-2010, 08:51 PM   #8
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What type of drywall for garage


I meant 'joints' of the second layer of drywall when compared to the 'joints' of the first layer.
The 'seams' of each layer needs to be staggered a minimum of 8" or the rating doesn't apply.
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Old 04-03-2010, 09:13 PM   #9
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What type of drywall for garage


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Originally Posted by bjbatlanta View Post
I'm sure he meant joints. When double layering drywall for firecode, the joints must be staggered between layers.
I doubt the weight of 2 layers of 5/8" firecode would be an issue on the ceiling, but certainly worth checking into (again) with local code officials. It's pretty much overkill, but something the OP queried about. In many locales, 1/2" is perfectly acceptable.
As far as I know, in NYC "Fireproofing" where required, calls for using 5/8" drywall. But fastening to ceilings, I'm certain requires more than the basic methods used with 1/2"!

Last edited by spark plug; 04-03-2010 at 09:14 PM. Reason: Using the same terms sequentially
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Old 04-03-2010, 11:11 PM   #10
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What type of drywall for garage


blueBSH, Massive changes in humidity? I'm not sure what you mean. As mentioned in previous posts you should use Type "X" 5/8" board between the garage and the heated living space (on the garage side of the walls.) Normally, code also requires Type "X" 5/8" board on the ceiling also. The remainder of the garage can be finished with 1/2" board. Always fire tape your joints. Don't worry about using a mold and moisture resistant board, not worth the money. If the outer garage walls and ceiling are not insulated then spend your money there and insulate them. You could also run some heat out to the garage if that is practical for you. Unless you have a dirt floor you should not have humidity problems if you follow my suggestions. Drywall board does not like unheated spaces. Over time it could deteriorate on you. At a minimum I would apply a coat of primer/sealer to further protect your board.
Cheers, and remember, my advice is worth what it cost.
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Old 04-04-2010, 07:38 AM   #11
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What type of drywall for garage


I don't know where you're located in IL, but I'm from Belleville originally and it gets awfully humid there (near St. Louis and the Mississippi). Same here in the Atlanta area. Most people tend to leave their garage doors open a lot of the time, so humidity DOES enter into the equation. I wouldn't worry with MR or Mold Resistant either.....
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Old 04-04-2010, 08:52 AM   #12
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Most people tend to leave their garage doors open a lot of the time, so humidity DOES enter into the equation.
The kind of humidity I was thinking about was more along the lines of frost in the garage on the inside of the exterior walls during freezing weather. Properly insulated and a good vapor barrier should prevent any structural problems. I don't see Summer humidity changes being problematic if his attic is properly ventilated.

Another option in the garage would be to use 1/2" OSB finished with a glossy oil based paint wherever Type "X" is not required. It's tough as nails and takes a lot of abuse in garages without showing any wear.
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Old 04-04-2010, 09:54 AM   #13
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What type of drywall for garage


Gotcha. I've got an open carport that had drywall and stippled ceiling. When the stipple started turning loose a couple of years after we bought it (as expected) the drywall came down and plywood went up. Walls are same siding as the house, of course.
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Old 04-05-2010, 11:54 PM   #14
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What type of drywall for garage


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I doubt if 2 layers of 5/8" sheetrock is safe to install on a ceiling without special reinforcements (i.e. framing?)!


ive seen triple layer 5/8ths on some multi family tuck under garages those were on very heavy laminate beams .. you really dont need more than 1 layer unless your in a multi family . last ive known anyways ....

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