Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Drywall & Plaster

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-13-2009, 11:20 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 55
Share |
Default

Wavy taping seams - Help (drywall taping)


I just put on the taping. Some of them look wavy, did I do something wrong? The tape is stuck to sheetrock. I pulled the joint tape a couple of times to get the excess hot mud out. I pulled the middle. then I pulled pulled each side once or twice. Then the middle again. Whats going on?

newbpainter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2009, 12:46 AM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 55
Default

Wavy taping seams - Help (drywall taping)


Some more info.

I used a 4 inch knife thats quit ridgid. I didn't put a lot of mud on the seams but I did enough to cover. When I applied the tape I pulled hard at a 45 degree angle. How hard am i supposed to pull?

I'm worried I didn't do it right.


Last edited by newbpainter; 05-14-2009 at 12:52 AM.
newbpainter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2009, 07:44 AM   #3
Not so new
 
12penny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Lehigh Valley, Pa.
Posts: 932
Default

Wavy taping seams - Help (drywall taping)


newb...you shouldnt have to pull so hard or use such an aggressive angle with your knife. If you mixed your mud correctly it should flow on pretty easily.

1. Mud the joint.
2. Put the tape on.
3. At a much shallower angle, draw the knife accross the tape to embed.
4. Use the mud that comes out of the joint to lay a thin film over the tape.

It the tape bunches up dont use as much pressure and/or change the angle. The point is to get mud on the joint not pull it all off with the knife.
12penny is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2009, 01:45 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 55
Default

Wavy taping seams - Help (drywall taping)


Quote:
Originally Posted by 12penny View Post
newb...you shouldnt have to pull so hard or use such an aggressive angle with your knife. If you mixed your mud correctly it should flow on pretty easily.

1. Mud the joint.
2. Put the tape on.
3. At a much shallower angle, draw the knife accross the tape to embed.
4. Use the mud that comes out of the joint to lay a thin film over the tape.

It the tape bunches up dont use as much pressure and/or change the angle. The point is to get mud on the joint not pull it all off with the knife.
Ok. Just to be safe I'll leave a little bit more underneath the tape. I guess I'm back to scrapping and sanding.

oh and any explanation for the wavy seams?
newbpainter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2009, 01:48 PM   #5
Not so new
 
12penny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Lehigh Valley, Pa.
Posts: 932
Default

Wavy taping seams - Help (drywall taping)


not sure what you mean by "wavy". Maybe a pic would help.
12penny is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2009, 04:04 PM   #6
Drywall Contractor
 
LadyFinisher's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: GA
Posts: 7
Default

Wavy taping seams - Help (drywall taping)


Are you doing this all by hand?

Hot mud dries pretty quick especially if you don't mix it properly you might try ready mix med. weight instead.

A more flexable knife might help you as well.

Also if you have not done very much work in drywall it may help you to use fiber mesh tape instead of paper tape.

Last edited by LadyFinisher; 05-14-2009 at 04:08 PM.
LadyFinisher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2009, 04:56 PM   #7
Old School
 
Willie T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: St. Petersburg, FL Minds of moderate caliber ordinarily condemn everything which is beyond them.
Posts: 3,634
Default

Wavy taping seams - Help (drywall taping)


It helps to teach yourself "why" you are even using this tape. It's not decoration. It has a structural function just as the foundation of a house does.
· Is it to fill the gap between the two sheets of drywall? ...No.
· Is it to level out the surfaces? ...No.
· It is to create a solid, continuous surface bond between the two sheets that will show no cracks when small shrinkage and settlement movements occur in the future.
So............ Your main purpose is to allow (or "help") the three elements of...
1. The paper on the face of each sheet
2. The tape, itself
3. The mating coat of mud
... to combine smoothly as a unit... adhere to one another... and dry as a hard, solid bridge upon which to build additional layers of finishing compound (mud).

You do this by, first of all, making sure everything will stick together in more than just a physical, surface bond. You are looking for a chemical adhesion. You do not have to worry about creating a substance that will do this. It's already been created, and it's called "mud".

But you DO have to provide the proper environment and application process for it to do it's job correctly and fully.

This means (believe it or not) that you have to provide additional moisture for the chemical elements in the mud to do their thing.

Step one is to mix your taping mud a little on the sloppy side. The consistency should not be like butter or mashed potatoes... but like mashed potatoes with a big hunk of butter mixed in. The way your kids like to do it at Thanksgiving dinner.

Secondly, this mud is laid into a "prepared surface". Too big a gap between sheets, chunks missing from edges, and paper scraped off the surface of the sheet are bad. They draw water out of the mud too quickly, leaving a dry surface that will not glue itself down right. They also provide huge areas for the mud to shrink into, instead of staying where it is needed... up on the surfaces, helping all three elements combine as one sheet. All these problem areas need to be filled with mud, and left to thoroughly dry hard before you begin taping.

Now you can go on to step two. This is the process of spreading a “thicker than necessary” layer of mud down the strip to be covered with tape... and it needs to be wider than the tape that will cover it. You want plenty of mud on there.

Next, we consider water. Do you know some guys even quickly wipe a wet sponge across the joint before applying mud because moist surfaces are that important for good adhesion? I don’t do that, but I do religiously follow this next procedure.

I keep a bucket of clean water at hand to not only keep all my tools wet, but to also moisten the tape before application. After I cut a piece of tape to length, I loosely wrap it around one hand. I dip this hand (with the tape wrapped around it) into the bucket of water for about a half a second. Just dip it in, and pull it out. Then I proceed like you have probably already been doing.

The trick in wiping the tape on is to, one, keep your knife wet, two, tilt it at about a 45 degree angle, three, keep firm (not hard... just solid and firm) pressure against the wall, and four, be certain that you are always squeezing mud out from under the tape as you drag the knife along.

That’s it. I used to also apply some of that excess mud back onto the tape. I’m learning it is better not to. You are now at the stage where you want that tape, mud, and paper to all dry together............... THOROUGHLY. Additional mud on top of the tape right now really does little more than prolong the deep drying process. It often won’t hurt anything, but why add more time?

One more thing. DO NOT start applying more mud until the tape coat has dried all the way. ALL THE WAY.

Try this, and I think you will soon begin to be happy with your taping jobs.
__________________
"True eloquence consists in saying all that is necessary, and only that which is."
François Duc de La Rochefoucauld
Willie T

Last edited by Willie T; 05-14-2009 at 05:15 PM.
Willie T is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Willie T For This Useful Post:
Axecutioner-B (07-25-2010)
Old 05-15-2009, 02:33 AM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 55
Default

Wavy taping seams - Help (drywall taping)


I think the "wavy" is from my pulling technique. Thanks guys for the help. Especially Willie T, all of that it is really helping me. I greatly appreciate the help.
newbpainter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2009, 07:42 AM   #9
Old School
 
Willie T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: St. Petersburg, FL Minds of moderate caliber ordinarily condemn everything which is beyond them.
Posts: 3,634
Default

Wavy taping seams - Help (drywall taping)


Quote:
Originally Posted by newbpainter View Post
I think the "wavy" is from my pulling technique. Thanks guys for the help. Especially Willie T, all of that it is really helping me. I greatly appreciate the help.
It sure would be helpful if you could further describe your "wavy". At the other end of a computer screen like we are, that could mean almost anything.

A question. After they are dried, do the "wavy" parts move in and out as you apply pressure to them with a finger nail?
__________________
"True eloquence consists in saying all that is necessary, and only that which is."
François Duc de La Rochefoucauld
Willie T

Last edited by Willie T; 05-15-2009 at 07:48 AM.
Willie T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2009, 09:09 AM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 55
Default

Wavy taping seams - Help (drywall taping)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Willie T View Post
It sure would be helpful if you could further describe your "wavy". At the other end of a computer screen like we are, that could mean almost anything.

A question. After they are dried, do the "wavy" parts move in and out as you apply pressure to them with a finger nail?
Sorry I don't have a digital camera to take pics. No, the wavy parts don't move after it's dry. It's mud underneath the tape from my stop on go pulling technique.
newbpainter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2009, 09:36 AM   #11
Old School
 
Willie T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: St. Petersburg, FL Minds of moderate caliber ordinarily condemn everything which is beyond them.
Posts: 3,634
Default

Wavy taping seams - Help (drywall taping)


Yeah, like I wrote, squeezing out that mud from underneath is your aim in the taping process. You just want to leave a smooth, relatively thin layer underneath to cement everything together to create that hard bridge.

__________________
"True eloquence consists in saying all that is necessary, and only that which is."
François Duc de La Rochefoucauld
Willie T
Willie T is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Repairing cracked drywall seams pjm Drywall & Plaster 3 03-08-2009 12:34 PM
Bad drywall taping GSaunders02 Drywall & Plaster 27 01-06-2009 08:02 AM
Drywall Taping Cost loosegroove Building & Construction 10 10-22-2007 05:41 PM
Drywall seams tenzo Building & Construction 13 08-14-2007 11:39 AM
Drywall taping and skim coats helpless handyman Painting 7 08-11-2006 09:09 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.