Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Drywall & Plaster

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

View Poll Results: What is your preference?
Vertical and Paper tape 2 18.18%
Vertical and Mesh 0 0%
Horizonial and Paper 5 45.45%
Horizonial and Mesh 5 45.45%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 11. This poll is closed

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-06-2011, 02:38 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Philadelphia Pa
Posts: 190
Rewards Points: 0
Share |
Default

Vertical or Horizonal & Papertape or Plastic mesh?


Age old debate! Ok so I am soon to be hanging three fairly small rooms, (8X10, 8x13 and 12X14) ceiling and walls. I can hang the drywall as well as the next guy but must admit I SUCK at finisihing. Luckily I have a couple buddies that ARE good at it. (beer and pizza rocks) My question is residential hang drywall vertical or horizonal? I have always done vertical, but see alot of people go horizonal on here? (ceilings are 7'6") SHOULD a gap be left at the floor? If so how much? I have used paper tape and mesh, didnt see that much of a difference, but again I SUCK at finishing!


Evil Scotsman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2011, 03:26 PM   #2
Member
 
rditz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Lindsay, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 271
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Vertical or Horizonal & Papertape or Plastic mesh?


i personally do it horizontally and use paper tape. always start with the top sheet tight to your ceiling boards and the bottom sheet i leave up to 1" from the rough flooring. this gives me enough room for a pry tool to stand on to press the sheet tightly to the top sheet. the pry tool (if you balance left-right on it) allows for easy adjustment

also, by going horizontally, you can use longer sheets of drywall (if you can get them to the room you are doing. this will mean less seams.

secret to taping is a thin coat of mud, i pre-cut the tape and pre-fold it for the corners. then i gently press it in with my trowel and coat with a this layer of compound. key is thin... thin means less sanding, less air bubbles, less coats.

good luck.

rod

rditz is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to rditz For This Useful Post:
Evil Scotsman (01-07-2011)
Old 01-07-2011, 06:15 AM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Philadelphia Pa
Posts: 190
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Vertical or Horizonal & Papertape or Plastic mesh?


Less sanding, air bubbles, less coats IS A GOOD THING! Thanks
Evil Scotsman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2011, 09:06 AM   #4
Drywall Texture Pro in Fl
 
stoner529's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 174
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Vertical or Horizonal & Papertape or Plastic mesh?


Quote:
Originally Posted by rditz View Post
i personally do it horizontally and use paper tape. always start with the top sheet tight to your ceiling boards and the bottom sheet i leave up to 1" from the rough flooring. this gives me enough room for a pry tool to stand on to press the sheet tightly to the top sheet. the pry tool (if you balance left-right on it) allows for easy adjustment

also, by going horizontally, you can use longer sheets of drywall (if you can get them to the room you are doing. this will mean less seams.

secret to taping is a thin coat of mud, i pre-cut the tape and pre-fold it for the corners. then i gently press it in with my trowel and coat with a this layer of compound. key is thin... thin means less sanding, less air bubbles, less coats.

good luck.

rod

Wow you just pretty much cured the vertical vs horizontal debate with me. I am thinking the only reason people go vertical is because they can do it themselves easier then hanging a 4X12. they are very heavy and it isnt easy doing yourself.

Paper or mesh doesnt matter. Just the mesh saves a step but i have heard you should only use hot mud on mesh and not regular.
__________________
how to remove popcorn
stoner529 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2011, 09:12 AM   #5
Experienced
 
Jackofall1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Southern Michigan
Posts: 2,822
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Vertical or Horizonal & Papertape or Plastic mesh?


You should definately hang the ceiling horizontal.... takes a lot more sheets to do vertical.

I'm no pro but I like to hand walls vertical, just my preference.
__________________
When its all said and done there is usually more said than done

Last edited by Jackofall1; 01-07-2011 at 10:11 AM.
Jackofall1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2011, 09:24 AM   #6
Drywall Texture Pro in Fl
 
stoner529's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 174
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Vertical or Horizonal & Papertape or Plastic mesh?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackofall1 View Post
You should definately hand the ceiling horizontal.... takes a lot more sheets to do vertical.

I'm no pro but I like to hand walls vertical, just my preference.

Well if you are hanging a ceiling you should always go perpendicular to the joists anyway. never parellel.
__________________
how to remove popcorn
stoner529 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2011, 10:49 AM   #7
Member
 
rditz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Lindsay, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 271
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Vertical or Horizonal & Papertape or Plastic mesh?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackofall1 View Post
You should definately hang the ceiling horizontal.... takes a lot more sheets to do vertical.

I'm no pro but I like to hand walls vertical, just my preference.

That is just TOOOOOO funny...

it took me a second to get it, but when I did I was laughin'

thanks Jack


rod
rditz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2011, 11:04 AM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South of Boston, MA
Posts: 17,248
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Vertical or Horizonal & Papertape or Plastic mesh?


Quote:
Originally Posted by rditz View Post
That is just TOOOOOO funny...
it took me a second to get it, but when I did I was laughin'
thanks Jack
rod
I had to read that 2x before I got it

I have hung walls vertical in the past
Never could get butt joints to look right
Now I have the proper tool for butt joints so I hang horizontal
Scuba_Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2011, 11:24 AM   #9
Member
 
rditz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Lindsay, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 271
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Vertical or Horizonal & Papertape or Plastic mesh?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackofall1 View Post
You should definately hang the ceiling horizontal.... takes a lot more sheets to do vertical.

I'm no pro but I like to hand walls vertical, just my preference.

you would need one heck of a pouch to hold the screws to do it that way... but think of the other benefit... you wouldn't need a lift or tall friends to put them up.... hahaha
rditz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2011, 11:26 AM   #10
Experienced
 
Jackofall1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Southern Michigan
Posts: 2,822
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Vertical or Horizonal & Papertape or Plastic mesh?


Puts a whole new meaning to a drop ceiling......
__________________
When its all said and done there is usually more said than done
Jackofall1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2011, 12:14 PM   #11
Household Handyman
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Albany, Ga.
Posts: 2,270
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Vertical or Horizonal & Papertape or Plastic mesh?


This is one of those questions that if you asked ten (10) sheet-rock hangers how they do this: You would get ten (10) different answers.
I was always taught to hang the sheets as "rditz" stated, this would be for wall strength also. I never tried to hand the ceiling "horizontal" though, interesting concept there,
"Jackofall1".
Thurman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2011, 12:18 PM   #12
Member
 
rditz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Lindsay, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 271
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Vertical or Horizonal & Papertape or Plastic mesh?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Thurman View Post
I never tried to hand the ceiling "horizontal" though, interesting concept there, "Jackofall1".
please... send pictures of a ceiling with the drywall vertically installed..

rod
rditz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2011, 01:39 PM   #13
Experienced
 
Jackofall1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Southern Michigan
Posts: 2,822
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Vertical or Horizonal & Papertape or Plastic mesh?


I am working on it, the trouble is it keeps falling down, anyone know of any good glue?
__________________
When its all said and done there is usually more said than done
Jackofall1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2011, 02:54 PM   #14
Drywall Texture Pro in Fl
 
stoner529's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 174
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Vertical or Horizonal & Papertape or Plastic mesh?


Quote:
Originally Posted by jackofall1 View Post
i am working on it, the trouble is it keeps falling down, anyone know of any good glue?

duh. You ever heard of liquid nails? Sticks great! Watch out for stalagtites
__________________
how to remove popcorn
stoner529 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2011, 06:40 PM   #15
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 72
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Vertical or Horizonal & Papertape or Plastic mesh?


I always go perpendicular to the framing member, few exceptions. First, 5/8" sheetrock over 2' centers on the ceiling, 1/2" can be used over 16" centers. Perpendicular will give it more strength less chance of sagging. Perpendicular on the walls will allow you to be working a seem around most of the room at 4'. Yes you will have butt joints. But you will not be going up and down as much as if you go vertical. I would take the 6" off of the bottom. You can use that scrap sometimes around doors, windows and such. I would keep the gap at the floor between 1/4"and 1/2". Just enough to keep it minimal but with enough tolerance to make it fit simply. To big of a gap and it can cause problems with the baseboard. I would be using 1 1/2" nails when necessary and 1 1/4" screws everywhere else. You can cut the top off of the top sheet going to the ceiling but remember that then your tapered edge of the sheetrock is on the bottom and it may need to be mudded to kill the look of the tapered edge, but if you put in base board molding then that would hide it.

I use only 90 minute or less hot mud over fiberglass tape. My method is to fiberglass the tapered seems and angles (making sure that you push the fiberglass into the angles as best you can with your fingers, because using a knife can slice the tape). Prefill the butts and headers and use taping mud and paper tape on those. If the prefill on the butts and headers are dry then the taping mud (very loose mud) with tape will dry fast, because you will wipe most of that mud out from under the tape. Then mix up a 1/3 of a bucket of hot mud. Start with a few inches of water in the bucket and a half of a bag of hot mud be sure to mix thoroughly but don't over mix. Add water or powder as needed, looking for the mud to fall off of a scoup with your 6" knife in a blob when turned sideways. Thick but easy to work. Be sure and clean all tools between each bucket so the old mud doesn't set up the new!
Do the recessed tapered edged seems first with an 8" knife. Make sure you feather the edges always, but if there are a few that get away from you then scrape it down and fill in with a tight swipe of mud. After you spread the mud on the seem and have feathered the edges and made a pass or two over the seem to even it out, you can check the seem by laying your 8" knife perpendicular to the ceiling across the seem. If you see a line you may need to take a little more off. Better a bit recessed than to have a hump with hot mud. Then I start my angles with a method called north south, east west. Start with either but keep them together. In other words walls opposite of each other not adjacent. If you do north south walls then you will be mudding the east west ceiling angles with them on the first trip around. I use a 4 inch knife here, feather the edge and turn the bottom of the handle in a bit towards the angle as you go. By now your butts and headers should be ready for the second coat. They are done with an 8" knife also. A pass on each side, with feathered edges, leaving a line in the middle. Go easy on the mud here. You again can check the recess that will be caused by the taped joint by holding your 8" knife perpendicular to the sheetrock with one tip on the middle of the taped joint and the other on the sheetrock. Again less is better with hot mud. Once hot mud is dry you can use a 6" knife to scrape ridges and lap marks and any bumps and use a sander after that if needed. I start with the other side of the angles next with mud straight out of the finish mud box (it may need a little thinning but usually it works)and the 4" knife. Once those are done, then thin the mud so a scoup with your six inch knife and then turned sideways will allow two to three drops to fall off. Use your 12 inch knife and do the tapered seems, feathering the edge and making a few passing to even it up. You check it the same way by sticking your knife perpendicular to the sheetrock over the seem to see if more mud needs to come off to keep it flat. If you leave a fine line then you know that you have a little sanding to do. Don't try and make it perfect, thats why you sand and touch at the end. Then last you run your butts and headers. 12" pass on each side, feathering the edges, checking with the knife. The finish mud is more foregiving than hot mud.

There will still be wet mud that gets disturbed as you cross over with the different applications, don't worry, when dry put more mud on.

After its dry, sand and touch up. If you don't like it, sand and touch up some more. A journey man will apply three coats of mud and sand and touch up. You can apply ever what is needed to make the job look good. Oh and buy a sponge sander from Home Depot, fine grit. Never use to coarse of sandpaper or screens.

redmanblackdog is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to redmanblackdog For This Useful Post:
Dusty1 (03-19-2011), Evil Scotsman (01-10-2011)
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Can you snake plastic pipes? rosemonster Plumbing 10 01-17-2011 07:09 AM
Plastic plywood, Plastic sheets, Plastic decking Spud Building & Construction 1 10-16-2009 04:43 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.