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Old 01-08-2011, 08:34 PM   #1
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unwrapping drywall covered corners


I am in the process of installing craftsman style door trim to a previously drywall covered doorway. How do I get rid of the mud buildup to the metal bead. With the added thickness of the mud, my trim does not sit flat against the wall.

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Old 01-08-2011, 08:51 PM   #2
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unwrapping drywall covered corners


Have you removed the corner bead yet?

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Old 01-08-2011, 09:22 PM   #3
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unwrapping drywall covered corners


No, I haven't started yet.
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Old 01-08-2011, 10:21 PM   #4
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unwrapping drywall covered corners


I would need to know more about the project. Can you just wrap the new trim package around the existing corners? Are the corners in bad shape as far as trying to line up the new trim?

If you can give me a little more information, I might be able to help.
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Old 01-09-2011, 06:53 AM   #5
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unwrapping drywall covered corners


Typically,the trims will fit just fine after you remove the corner bead---and the casings will hide the disturbed area.
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Old 01-09-2011, 10:34 AM   #6
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unwrapping drywall covered corners


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Typically,the trims will fit just fine after you remove the corner bead---and the casings will hide the disturbed area.
Thanks,
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Old 01-09-2011, 10:41 AM   #7
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unwrapping drywall covered corners


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Originally Posted by redmanblackdog View Post
I would need to know more about the project. Can you just wrap the new trim package around the existing corners? Are the corners in bad shape as far as trying to line up the new trim?

If you can give me a little more information, I might be able to help.
New construction actually, I told the contractor not to wrap the openings but he did anyway. I want these doorways to have wood casings with headers in craftsman style. I do not know if I should just put my casings over the drywall or rip out the drywall wrap and expose the studs and go from there. These doorways do not have doors.
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Old 01-09-2011, 11:46 AM   #8
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unwrapping drywall covered corners


I have done it both ways. It depends on whether the quality of the drywall work and the desired width of the jamb. I would line the trim up just by holding it in place over the drywall corners to see if it would work.

If you feel you need to remove the drywall corners, then use a sharp pointed cats paw. Typically a metal corner that nails on is about 1 1/8 inches wide on each side. But a taped on corner can be as little as 5/8" wide.

I would establish which kind you have. If it is tape on then all you have to do is slice with a utility knife along the metal and pull it off. If it is nailed on then you will need a cats paw. Usually the nailing pattern on a metal corner is about every 12". I would start at the bottom, and once you have found and removed those nails, then you can grab the metal and pull it up to show where the next nails are located, and so on and so on. Be carefull because it is metal and you can cut your hands.
If you use this process then I would also remove the (typically) 1/2" drywall on the jamb.

Then like Mike said the casing will hide any disturbed parts of the arch. Remember though that there are a thousand ways to skin a cat. So I can't tell you every possible scenario. For example I know a taper that nails his metal on and then paper tapes it. So go slow to start with until you know exactly what you have. Even though you will be going over it, try to keep the drywall in as good as shape as you can.

One more thing. Once you have found the metal under the mud. It is still a good idea to slice moderately along metal edge to keep damage close to the corner. I have seen many times where pulling something away from a painted wall can sometimes pull the paint off in sheets, causing more damage and work over the wall area.


Last edited by redmanblackdog; 01-09-2011 at 11:54 AM.
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