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Old 01-02-2012, 03:14 PM   #1
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Temporary drywall alternative/other advice


Hello everyone. I have a bit of a dilemma in regards to my house.

Katrina didn't do any damage to the structure of our house besides a drop of about 3 inches in one corner area near the kitchen. The main damage was the destruction of most of the drywall throughout. Ours is a family of 7, and we couldn't get two FEMA trailers, so we right after Katrina we removed all the drywall in the house from about 3 feet below the ceiling and down. Over the studs we put rolls of a thin silver cardboard type material. That's how things were mostly left with some repairs here and there.

The only rooms we renovated right off the bat were two bedrooms.

Now, the issue for me, is that right now I really want to go back and start making some improvements to the house interior, but seven people live here, and house is small and pretty cramped. It would be a tremendous chore for any one of the rooms to be redone with new drywall, and would require flaps of plastic and all to help with the dust from sanding and such.

SO, my question is, is there a very CLEAN way to put up drywall, maybe without mud, or maybe without sanding that I can use to cover my walls with minimal hassle for everyone involved, or is there some alternative to drywall that I can use for the present that would at least provide a covering over the studs, and allow me to remove the silver cardboard stuff.

I don't need beautiful walls, I just need a flat surface that I can paint, and put up simple trim over that will make for a room that looks at least halfway decent.

Thank you.

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Old 01-02-2012, 03:30 PM   #2
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Temporary drywall alternative/other advice


I "sanded" the drywall mud with a bucket of water and sponge recently. Time consuming, but it's a rental house I was remodeling a family room in, with the family living in the house. I couldn't have the cloud of white dust going everywhere.

You might want to give that some thought.

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Old 01-02-2012, 03:43 PM   #3
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Temporary drywall alternative/other advice


Drywalling done right has very little dust. It should only need sanding on the last coat. Even then if you use a shop vac and a cheap attachment that attaches to the hose with a sanding pad on it most will go in the vac.
Better yet rent a drywall sanding machine. Home Depot have these items. http://www.all-wall.com/Categories/D...ywall-Sanders/

Last edited by joecaption; 01-02-2012 at 03:48 PM.
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Old 01-02-2012, 06:48 PM   #4
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Temporary drywall alternative/other advice


hi, joecaption is right. if drywall is finished right? there is very little dust or sanding. I most always used a damp sponge mop for sanding, mostly along the edges where feathering ends. just damp not soaked! if too wet? you'll begin rollong the paper of the drywall.

just rub it over finished area lightly, if any imperfections in finish? little holes and such, the damp mop will fill those rather smoothly. too wet will go through the mud into the tape, or drywall paper. which is much harder to repair! when done with mop, let it dry completely then wip it all over with soft clean rag. to remove any dust left behind? there should be little to no dust at all.

when dry, prime and paint. it's usual to see joints and nails/screws until paint dries. if needed? two coats of paint and you should be fine
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Old 01-02-2012, 08:21 PM   #5
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Temporary drywall alternative/other advice


Thanks a million for the replies folks! I didn't realize you could "wet sand" it so to speak, that will be the ideal way to go for sure.

Thanks. :D
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