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Old 12-23-2009, 02:31 PM   #16
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sound proofing utility room


Many good thoughts here. The pre-damped drywall brands mentioned do a great job. These panels are essentially (generally) standard drywall with a bit of damping compound put in between on an assembly line. QuietRock, Supress, ComfortGuard, SoundBreak. All great, and all work.

Better and cheaper to just use really inexpensive standard 5/8" drywall and damp the panels yourself in the field. You can use QuietGlue, Swedak, DecibleDrop or Green Glue. The resulting wall will be heavier (very critical) and likely better damped.

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Old 12-23-2009, 02:40 PM   #17
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If he can have an outside air supply that would be even better

I wonder how much of the noise is being transferred from the furnace directly to the basement floor and propogating through the foundation. No amount of wall treatment can mitigate that.
what do you mean by outside air supply? The furnance right now has its fresh air intake coming in from outside, it has PVC pipe running to the side of the house along with the exhaust going a similar route..
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Old 12-23-2009, 02:44 PM   #18
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I wonder how much of the noise is being transferred from the furnace directly to the basement floor and propogating through the foundation. No amount of wall treatment can mitigate that.
That's certainly a consideration. Given the mass of the slab, it's not likely to get excited from the vibration of the fan. Not likely, but anything's possible
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Old 12-23-2009, 02:52 PM   #19
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That's certainly a consideration. Given the mass of the slab, it's not likely to get excited from the vibration of the fan. Not likely, but anything's possible
I think 90% of the noise is transfered in the open air... because in the furance room its loud... go to the next room next to it, its about 70% of the noise... farthest room abou 30%.. upstairs about 10-20%
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Old 12-23-2009, 02:55 PM   #20
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sound proofing utility room


That's a good bit of data and a good assessment.

In my opinion there's just not enough noise to warrant anything more than drywall. The mass of double drywall will stop a great deal of sound. The trick is sealing the room up. This means any air exchange in and out of that room as well as the door itself. Someone else mentioned this. Maybe pyper. He had nailed some great info.
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Old 12-23-2009, 03:00 PM   #21
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That's a good bit of data and a good assessment.

In my opinion there's just not enough noise to warrant anything more than drywall. The mass of double drywall will stop a great deal of sound. The trick is sealing the room up. This means any air exchange in and out of that room as well as the door itself. Someone else mentioned this. Maybe pyper. He had nailed some great info.
I kind of think if I sub divide that room into two rooms, one where the furnance and water heater are and drywall it up, and maybe have something like a low profile carpet on the floor around the rest of the room (with some space left between it and the furance for fire reasons) it would damper the noise a good bit, the other half of the room now has "extra" carpet laying in it and the noise on that end does damper down some due to the carpet...
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Old 12-23-2009, 03:04 PM   #22
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Not a bad plan. I think, though, that just sealing the room will do the trick. Any sound waves that are of a low enough energy to be absorbed by that carpet would (generally) have insufficient energy to make it through a sealed wall, especially if made more massive with a second layer of drywall.
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Old 12-23-2009, 03:07 PM   #23
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Not a bad plan. I think, though, that just sealing the room will do the trick. Any sound waves that are of a low enough energy to be absorbed by that carpet would (generally) have insufficient energy to make it through a sealed wall, especially if made more massive with a second layer of drywall.
Going to have to run these ideas up against the local code guy and see what comes back as a plan
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Old 12-23-2009, 03:26 PM   #24
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I suspect the biggest issue is sealing the room. I'm no HVAC guym but most utioity rooms require a slooted door, etc due to the combustion taking place in there. May not be an issue with you, as you have fresh air coming in as part of the air exchange.
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Old 12-24-2009, 05:00 AM   #25
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sound proofing utility room


Cork is a renewable resource. You might even be able to claim a green credit for using it. It has great natural sound insulating properties perfect to your situation. Libraries and museums have been using it for years for this reason.

Since this is a utility room, you don't care but it does come in beautiful colors should you ever want to be creative and do a floor. Clients do not always take my advice but any nailed floor I recommend installing comes with a recommendation for a cork underlay layer because of its natural qualities.

You should probably insulate those walls with something before you put it up. Your local box store will not have it in the thickness and sizes you need to finish a wall but shop online.
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Old 12-24-2009, 10:41 AM   #26
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Cork is a little soft and a little resilient and essentially does a little. It was used to reduce footfall noise years ago as an underlayment.

Today there are much more effective materials and systems, but the real issue here is that a floor treatment isn't going to help in this fellow's case.
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Old 12-24-2009, 11:22 AM   #27
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Cork is a little soft and a little resilient and essentially does a little. It was used to reduce footfall noise years ago as an underlayment.

Today there are much more effective materials and systems, but the real issue here is that a floor treatment isn't going to help in this fellow's case.
Was not suggesting a flooring material. I use panels of cork all the time on walls. I get nice, thick 4x8 sheets.
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Old 12-24-2009, 12:27 PM   #28
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Well, cork on the surface of a wall may help with sound conditioning (reverb) for the sound waves that have insufficient energy to leave the room. Just like the use of foam panels on the walls of a sound room.

For higher energy waves (low frequency bass or high volume mids), lightweight spongy materials just aren't going to do a whole heck of a lot.

Given that the walls are drywalled and sound is still escaping, we can conclude that the energy of the sound is sufficient to get the walls moving and / or the sound is leaking.

I'm more in the camp of the sound leaking, but sound would likely easily pass through single sheet drywall.

Anything we use for sound isolation (not in-room sound conditioning) has to fall into one of these four buckets:

- Decoupling
- Absorption
- Mass
- Damping

Lightly spongy, lightweight materials can't effectively decouple if deployed on the studs.

Spongy materials are too dense to contribute to cavity resonance absorption.

These materials generally have very low density and mass.

These materials don't damp what thay are in contact with.

This is why humble drywall really works well. Very low cost, yet great mass.
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Old 12-24-2009, 12:34 PM   #29
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Was not suggesting a flooring material. I use panels of cork all the time on walls. I get nice, thick 4x8 sheets.
this method is used to reduce the sound from bouncing around the room. Usually used in media rooms to retain a pure sound. BUT... it will do nothing to keep the sound from leaving the room which is what the OP is asking for.
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Old 12-24-2009, 12:44 PM   #30
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Exactly

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