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Old 05-18-2013, 10:04 PM   #1
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skim coat advice


Hi There. Thanks to all who have offered me tips at each step of my drywall finishing. I am in the middle of putting on the first coat after taping, both walls and ceilings. I really dislike texture on walls and ceilings, so I think I am considering trying to skim coat the drywall.

So I am looking for any tips you may have to help with that. I have the blue lid finishing compound from Home Depot. Do I just thin that out a little and put as thin of a coat on the entire wall as possible? Multiple coats?

If I feather out edges and keep everything thin, can I achieve decent results with good paint and a thicker nap on the rollers? Trying to make the finished product look good.

All help and advice is much appreciated!
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Old 05-19-2013, 12:34 AM   #2
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skim coat advice


This might help you out. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OUxt_DQlSR8
Best of luck
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Old 05-19-2013, 04:52 AM   #3
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skim coat advice


If you do not like texture, why in the world would you skim coat the whole wall?
Whole lot of extra work for nothing. Just do the seams and screw heads.
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Old 05-19-2013, 06:00 AM   #4
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skim coat advice


I have used this method and the results are very good. If you don't want any texture be sure to use a small nap roller when you paint. That will cut down on the stipple from the roller cover.
Joe what this does is give you an equal transition from your smooth mud on your joints and screw heads to the rough paper on your drywall.
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Old 05-19-2013, 09:09 AM   #5
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As mentioned I'm interested in doing it to eliminate texture differences.

Again with the original question, is the blue lid compound good, and do I need to thin it down at all? And is it just put it on scrape it off like the first coat for filling screw holes or should it go on thicker than that?
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Old 05-19-2013, 09:25 AM   #6
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skim coat advice


Quote:
Originally Posted by joshs View Post
As mentioned I'm interested in doing it to eliminate texture differences.

Again with the original question, is the blue lid compound good, and do I need to thin it down at all? And is it just put it on scrape it off like the first coat for filling screw holes or should it go on thicker than that?
Did you watch the video?
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Old 05-19-2013, 09:39 AM   #7
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I did watch the video. Trying to avoid having to get more tools since I don't have an electric drill/mixer. He says in the video that he basically takes everything back off once it's on. Can I achieve that same effect with a 12" knife and just putting a thin layer of the blue lid compound on? Trying to avoid buying too many tools since this is the last time I'll probably have to do drywall for a long time. Thanks!
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Old 05-19-2013, 11:27 AM   #8
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ya you can thin your mud in pan mixing up small batches and apply with it your 12" knife and wipe it off with the 12" knife. its alot slower process and your arms will start to get sore especially once you get a bunch of mud wiped off and it gets thicker on you but its totally doable.
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Old 05-19-2013, 04:21 PM   #9
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Not the blue lids; http://www.usg.com/sheetrock-plus-3-...-compound.html

http://www.usg.com/sheetrock-topping...l#tab-features

This will work better; http://www.usg.com/usg-cover-coat-co...l#tab-features
Or use an "all-purpose" or "mid-weight" (pp.184) I'll let you figure out the best/most recent, lol; http://www.usg.com/documents/constru...k/chapter5.pdf

Last section; http://www.usg.com/rc/white-papers/f...r-en-J2010.pdf

Gary
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Old 05-19-2013, 04:24 PM   #10
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It's seriously a lot more work to just use the mud and a knife. What makes this so simple is thinning the mud so you can put it on with a roller. I mean a drill is something you can always use, heck get one at a pawn shop or on the internet for $20 and the paddle mixer is less than $10. I have always used the blue lid, I have never seen or used or even heard of that other one. Might be something new. But USG also tells you not to use this method of thinning and rolling. But I know for a fact it is used by several big drywall co.

Last edited by ToolSeeker; 05-19-2013 at 04:34 PM.
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Old 05-19-2013, 04:38 PM   #11
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Also, you seriously do NOT need to thin the mud, so you do not need a drill. mixer, etc. I have applied tons of this stuff without thinning it
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Old 05-19-2013, 04:55 PM   #12
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If your not going to thin it then I would go with the ultra light mud in the puke green lid, a lot easier to work with.
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Old 05-20-2013, 05:08 PM   #13
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Just my opinion, but anything other than regular ready-mix compound is crap. That said, IF you want the SLICKEST possible finish and plan on glaze coating the walls. Especially if you're using a short nap roller. Not wanting to create an argument, but YES I would thin the mud even if you just add a little bit of water in the pan you're using and "mix" it with your knife. What you're basically doing is just putting a thin layer of mud on the surface on and wiping it back off. The more you do the process, the "dryer" the mud gets since the drywall absorbs the moisture out of the mud. Adding water makes for easier application and wipe down. The finished joints are actually smother than the face paper on the drywall. You are just making the surfaces "equally" smooth. One coat should suffice for new work. Sand the entire surface, touch up as needed, and paint....
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Old 05-20-2013, 05:51 PM   #14
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You can certainly do it without thinning but it's a lot harder and a lot more work. Skim coat means a very light skim of mud on the wall not a thicker coat like to bury tape or feather a repair. A very light coat is what makes it possible to put it on with a paint roller like in the vid. then you take almost all of it back off. But even if you don"t thin it you should mix a bucket of mud before you use it. If you can't borrow a drill get a used 1/2" one then sell it on craigs list. Make sure the drill is 1/2" and get a paddle mixer not a paint mixer.
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