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-   -   Resilient channel? To use or not to use, that is the question. (http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/resilient-channel-use-not-use-question-128282/)

hyunelan2 12-31-2011 11:11 AM

Resilient channel? To use or not to use, that is the question.
 
I am currently framing my basement. Walls are composed by 2x4s, framed 16" oc. Basement is poured concrete foundation, built 2002.

I had planned on furring the ceiling with 2x2s @ 16" oc, to solve the issue of conduit and pipe runs getting in the way of the drywall. Since I'm going through the effort of furring the ceiling (about 800sqft), I decided to consider resilient channel for sound deadening reasons.

Does anyone have anything to share about their experiences with this, either installing or having it? Does it make that big of a difference to justify 3x-5x cost of wood furring?

I planned on stuffing the joist spaces with pink.

As for the walls, I see that it is supposed to be installed 24" oc, perpendicular to the studs. If I were to do this, does that reduce the drywall strength to similar to framing 24" oc? I don't want to have someone lean up against 1/2" drywall and start cracking it. Is a double layer a better idea, or 5/8? Does it make a big difference on walls? I would think decoupling the ceiling would be a bigger difference maker than the walls.


The basement is basically one big open room, plus a laundry room, HVAC room, and 2 closets. I don't need to deaden sound between rooms in the basement. The laundry room was built a year ago, and the walls are all insulated (both inside and outside walls). It might be nice to keep some of the noise from kids or if I'm watching a movie. I have 2 6 month old kids that will eventually be playing down there, so less sound transmission is good but I don't want it at the cost of fragile walls.


Thanks in advance :thumbup:

TarheelTerp 12-31-2011 11:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hyunelan2 (Post 808155)
The basement is basically one big open room, plus a laundry room, HVAC room, and 2 closets. I don't need to deaden sound between rooms in the basement.

Based on your intended use... go simple.
GWB direct to the studs and T-Bar drop ceiling.

hth

gma2rjc 12-31-2011 11:43 AM

Roxul Safe & Sound would provide better sound proofing than f/g.

Check into the Green Glue. I don't know a lot about it, but have heard that it's pretty good.

hyunelan2 12-31-2011 12:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TarheelTerp (Post 808164)
Based on your intended use... go simple.
GWB direct to the studs and T-Bar drop ceiling.

hth

Don't want to do a drop ceiling for 3 reasons:
  • It kills more headroom than drywall
  • Metal bars vibrate (there will be home theater equipment)
  • Not a fan of its appearance
I also remember when I briefly priced it out, that it cost more than just drywalling it.


Quote:

Originally Posted by gma2rjc (Post 808185)
Roxul Safe & Sound would provide better sound proofing than f/g.

Check into the Green Glue. I don't know a lot about it, but have heard that it's pretty good.

I'll check into the Roxul, thanks.

From what I saw on Green Glue, it's used as a layer between drywall: basically the cream filling in an Oreo.

TarheelTerp 12-31-2011 12:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hyunelan2 (Post 808201)
Don't want to do a drop ceiling for 3 reasons:

I saw this comment:
"to solve the issue of conduit and pipe runs getting in the way of the drywall".

Before you close up the ceiling (I'd use the channel) be sure you have dealt with EVERY single mechanical question mark that currently exists and allow for the 5 or 10 new issues that can reasonably be expected to show up in years to come.

gma2rjc 12-31-2011 12:49 PM

Before I had my basement ceiling drywalled, I wrapped all of the water pipes - warm and cold - in foam and used metal tape to seal all of the seams.

I also took a LOT of pictures of all of the plumbing, electrical, hvac ducts and gas lines making sure to include a window or doorway in each picture. That gives you perspective as to where things are in relation to the door or window. If you do that, make sure to get the pictures developed and keep them in a safe place where you can get to them right away - filing cabinet?

*knock on wood* So far I've had no problems with our drywall ceiling. I see it as being no different than having a second floor bathroom above a main floor living room. There's a potential for problems there too, but it doesn't stop people from putting a bathroom or two up there.

hyunelan2 12-31-2011 01:53 PM

To address some comments:

I plan on including access panels for key valves and dampners. Worst case scenario, I have to cut a hole out of the drywall. Not the end of the world. When I had my last house built, I videotaped a walk-through of the whole thing pre-drywall, following each run of HVAC, electric, gas, and water. It came in handy a couple of times. Thanks for the reminder to do that down there, although from my sketchup drawings I could probably re-engineer this place if I had to.

Back to the question of resilient channel: how much of a difference does it make? At this point, I am leaning in that direction but am not completely sold. What about drywall cracking/tape-pop? If you have a ceiling that is basically made to move, won't that be an issue?

chrisBC 01-02-2012 08:30 PM

If installed properly I don't believe you'd have an issue with cracking or pops. It is pretty standard in a lot of newer condos and apartment buildings, i've never seen it be an issue.

As to whether it would be better than 2x2's- in theory it is supposed to be, because it does not conduct sound as much as other building materials. I believe it does make a difference, judging by the differences in sound in older and newer buildings i've been in.

Whether it would merrit the extra cost, depends just how picky you are about sound. The roxul is definitely a good idea.

coupe 01-03-2012 04:52 PM

Don't want to do a drop ceiling for 3 reasons:
  • It kills more headroom than drywall
  • Metal bars vibrate (there will be home theater equipment)
  • Not a fan of its appearance
I also remember when I briefly priced it out, that it cost more than just drywalling it.


lets compare apples to apples.

when you factor in 2x2's for furring strips, plus drywall you're looking at lowering ceiling height by 2 1/4-2 3/8 inches. you can hang drop ceiling to within that limit, and still lift and slide panels back for access. I'd use a sheet of graph paper and number access needs with directory written as to what is where?

I've never heard a drop ceiling noise caused by vibrations, if each end of main beams are pop riveted. the weight of panels keeps them quiet.

with all the new styles today with, slim line grid or super fine. all different colors and patterns, surely you can find something you can live with. if you find something porous you like? it will absorb the sound, drywall will just bounce sound around til it dies.

yes drop ceilings cost more per square foot than drywall, but your time is worth something! when you figure the time to install furring strips +cost buy drywall, time to hang it, tape,finish and paint it, you're talking 3-4 days? if you have just a hint of knowledge of how to install drop ceilings? 800 square feet should only take you about 7-8 hours and it's done! if you can find a tile that you like and is white? I always pushed a white pop rivet up through the center of tile for each access panel needed for easy locating


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