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-   -   Repairing textured ceiling? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/repairing-textured-ceiling-184669/)

spinnaker 08-03-2013 12:45 AM

Repairing textured ceiling?
 
1 Attachment(s)
I have had some water damage done to my textured ceiling over the many years I have lived here. I had a contractor patch it and the pattern never really matched. Later I had I have patched it myself figuring the contractor did not do a very good job anyway and did an OK job. It is just me here so I never really cared. Now I am selling my house and want to get things fixed up the best I can.


How to best repair that ceiling so the repair is fairly undetectable? One thought I had was to skim coat the whole ceiling and float out the whole texture and start over. But that is a huge job as the damage is only in my living room but the ceiling is one large ceiling connected to the kitchen.

Would textured paint cover over the existing texture? My guess is no and I would have to sand the entire ceiling.

Would a competent contractor be able to match the pattern? Or could someone tell me how I can match it? I have attached a picture.

gregzoll 08-03-2013 02:06 AM

Need a picture of the damaged section, not one that is pre-existing.

user1007 08-03-2013 07:23 AM

Matching existing texture is what we hate most. Sometimes we can guess the technique used in the first place and blend in but it can be time consuming and more than a little expensive. Working with hot mud is in your future if you want to try.

I would ask around and see if you can get bids on spraying some sort of new knockdown texture over everything but even as I type this I wonder what it will look like.

How many square feet of damaged ceiling are we talking about here and how bad is it really where damaged and obvious? If you are trying to sell the place and you think it is a deal killer, I would actually think about 1/4" drywall taped, mudded, primed and painted through the whole space. It will mean cash out of your pocket but it will be cheaper in the long run than having the offer on the home reduced by a greater amount. Or having buyers just walk away.

Nothing looks worse to a buyer than a water damaged ceiling (with the exception of painted over wallpaper, laminate flooring and vinyl siding to this one). Whether all the water issues have been fixed or not. I would drop my offer to you substantially if ceiling patches with even legacy plumbing issues you swear you fixed lurked above my head. Why would you even show them to me? If you can afford it, and the leaks are all fixed. I would put a new flat ceiling up.

Or as suggested maybe a drywall contractor can spray a new and uniform knockdown texture over what you have. Worth a couple calls or emails for some advice and bids? Patching this situation will look like you patched the situation I fear.

ToolSeeker 08-03-2013 08:38 AM

I do a lot of texture repairs and that one would be hard to match, very hard. In my opinion I would go ahead and look into removing or covering it over. When selling your house a bad patch will look almost as bad as not patching. Any buyer will say I wonder why they had to patch, and when. I would sand down the rough texture then skim coat. That way you don't have to sand the whole ceiling smooth. Then I would sand and prime then paint, no texture. Check with a couple drywall contractors in your area this may not cost as much as you think it will. Keep in mind this could save you thousands on the bid for the purchase of your home. Potential buyers who see poor attempts at repairs start to wonder what else was done poorly that they can't see. Again just my opinion.

spinnaker 08-03-2013 09:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 1224486)
Matching existing texture is what we hate most. Sometimes we can guess the technique used in the first place and blend in but it can be time consuming and more than a little expensive. Working with hot mud is in your future if you want to try.

I would ask around and see if you can get bids on spraying some sort of new knockdown texture over everything but even as I type this I wonder what it will look like.

How many square feet of damaged ceiling are we talking about here and how bad is it really where damaged and obvious? If you are trying to sell the place and you think it is a deal killer, I would actually think about 1/4" drywall taped, mudded, primed and painted through the whole space. It will mean cash out of your pocket but it will be cheaper in the long run than having the offer on the home reduced by a greater amount. Or having buyers just walk away.

Nothing looks worse to a buyer than a water damaged ceiling (with the exception of painted over wallpaper, laminate flooring and vinyl siding to this one). Whether all the water issues have been fixed or not. I would drop my offer to you substantially if ceiling patches with even legacy plumbing issues you swear you fixed lurked above my head. Why would you even show them to me? If you can afford it, and the leaks are all fixed. I would put a new flat ceiling up.

Or as suggested maybe a drywall contractor can spray a new and uniform knockdown texture over what you have. Worth a couple calls or emails for some advice and bids? Patching this situation will look like you patched the situation I fear.


Quote:

Originally Posted by ToolSeeker (Post 1224513)
I do a lot of texture repairs and that one would be hard to match, very hard. In my opinion I would go ahead and look into removing or covering it over. When selling your house a bad patch will look almost as bad as not patching. Any buyer will say I wonder why they had to patch, and when. I would sand down the rough texture then skim coat. That way you don't have to sand the whole ceiling smooth. Then I would sand and prime then paint, no texture. Check with a couple drywall contractors in your area this may not cost as much as you think it will. Keep in mind this could save you thousands on the bid for the purchase of your home. Potential buyers who see poor attempts at repairs start to wonder what else was done poorly that they can't see. Again just my opinion.

I am leaning toward having someone do it. Maybe talk to the contractor. Perhaps save a bit by doing some of the prep work myself. Or perhaps depending on what he recommends, he will just do everything.

Downstairs measures around 25'x14'. Any idea what it would cost to cover that?

Also the question is where to stop. Same texture upstairs. Would that be noticed? Could the contractor at least get the textures close enough on the lower floor that the difference to the upper floor might not be noticed?

spinnaker 08-03-2013 09:18 AM

Also I am wondering if the contractor could build a bulkhead in the ceiling between the kitchen and living room (damage is in living room). As mentioned the living room flows into the kitchen but there is a doorway of sorts but the ceiling is contiguous.

Or would differences in kitchen / upstairs and living room be suspect? Also it is a townhouse and if there was another place up for sale not sure if buyer would figure the difference with the "bulk head".

user1007 08-03-2013 10:34 AM

Seems like you need to talk with local contractors. I know what a job like you need would cost here, and not as much as you might think, if it is just about spraying knockdown texture or drywalling your ceilings. But real labor in Chicago is expensive. Scabs without contractors licenses charge much less.

I don't really know what your place looks like or what the going rate around you is. Get some bids. For anyone to suggest what things might cost you, from where we are, would not be at all helpful to you.

Unless I missed something, you enhanced your thread to include discussion of fixing ceilings on two floors now? Or did I read wrong?

A competent real estate agent and a licensed general or renovation contactor, or maybe just a drywall contractor, can help you with this. The real estate agent will tell you, I hope, realistically, what you can get out of your place, fixed or not.

I hope it will be cheaper to fix this than having someone like me slice and dice an offer for the place because I see patch work. Ask your real estate person though. If the repairs you make are not what you will ever get for your place just do what you can and move on. Take the lowball offer. Someone like me might buy it. Just not for your asking price if there is water damage showing in the ceiling on two floors.

spinnaker 08-03-2013 11:41 AM

No my question on the second floor was simply had to do with matching. Say a contractor sprays the second floor. Is is unusual for homes to have a different ceiling on the first and second floor?

Or if different would that set off alarm bells too (with a potential buyer)?

user1007 08-03-2013 12:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spinnaker (Post 1224615)
No my question on the second floor was simply had to do with matching. Say a contractor sprays the second floor. Is is unusual for homes to have a different ceiling on the first and second floor?

Or if different would that set off alarm bells too (with a potential buyer)?

If both ceilings showed no patching, I don't think most would notice a texture difference.

ToolSeeker 08-03-2013 01:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 1224628)
If both ceilings showed no patching, I don't think most would notice a texture difference.

^^^^^agree.

spinnaker 08-03-2013 02:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 1224628)
If both ceilings showed no patching, I don't think most would notice a texture difference.

Quote:

Originally Posted by ToolSeeker (Post 1224643)
^^^^^agree.

Yeah I am thinking you would really need to be aware if you went upstairs and noticed the difference.

Now downstairs how the living room flows into the kitchen via a hallway of sorts (no doorway sadly. They might notice but maybe the contractor can somehow blend it in between living room and kitchen???


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