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-   -   Repair method question (http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/repair-method-question-167470/)

harlan07 12-27-2012 12:27 AM

Repair method question
 
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Hi. I am inexperienced with drywall, so I really don't know where to start for my repair.

I ripped some trim off around this shower and it pulled some of the drywall off, and tore the paper some places too. I am retiling the shower and will use a corner trim piece that wraps around and covers part of the drywall, so it's not critical that I get a perfectly square edge to meet the tile plane (which probably isn't possible with that jagged mortar wall anyway).

Seattle2k 12-27-2012 01:38 AM

Did you pull off the metal corner bead? You'll now need to cut out the damaged drywall, from stud to stud. Then, use a sharp utility knife to cut the drywall back another 3/4", in order to reveal 1/2 of the face of the studs - this is to allow the new drywall patch to have all of its edges supported. You'll probably need to drive additional drywall screws into the old drywall's cut edge, to ensure it's fastened securely.
Then, install new strips of drywall with drywall screws. You want the head of the screws to sit just below the surface, without ripping through the paper face of the drywall. Lowes sells inexpensive drywall screw-setter bits that make this pretty much foolproof. http://www.lowes.com/pd_300547-353-D...1208867&rpp=32 (you can skip the screwsetters, if you maintain a light touch on your drill/driver's trigger).

For drywall-to-drywall seams, mud & tape the seams (paper seam tape), then 3 coats of mud on top of the joints, feathering out wider with each coat. After the second coat, use your drywall knife to knock down any ridges, then apply your third coat, thin and smooth. Wait for each coat to dry completely, before moving to the next. After 3rd coat dries, sand with a fine-grit sanding sponge. Wipe dust, with a lightly-damp cloth, allow to dry again, apply a good primer that is high in solids content, then 2 coats paint.

For the cornerbead, after attaching it, apply a coat of mud to both sides. Wait for it to dry, then apply a second wider coat. Sand, prime, paint.

If your walls are textured, you'll need to match the texture either before or after priming (depends a bit on the intended end result).

drywallschool.com is a great resource too.

ToolSeeker 12-27-2012 09:13 AM

Do not repair now, wait until you rip out the tile because you will do more damage then, why fix it twice. And it looks like the drywall goes behind the tile and you can't(shouldn't) do that now you are required to use a product like cement board.

harlan07 12-28-2012 01:57 AM

There wasn't a metal corner bead. The tile is already removed. That is a mortar bed that meets the drywall. Previously some plastic trim covered the corner. After ripping it off it pulled some sheet rock off.

Thanks for that website. I went there and studied how to coat the joints.

What I ended up doing was cutting the existing wall at the nearest stud and I floated in the new piece. I did one coat tonight.

The existing was 5/8" and my new piece is 5/8" but they don't match up well because the stud is out of square. It's a short wall so I don't have much to work with. I beveled the new piece with a knife, hoping the second coat will make it look good.

Probably needed 1/2" instead of 5/8

stoner529 12-28-2012 08:24 PM

Take this advice for drywall...HIRE OUT FOR IT. you will thank me for that advice trust me.

harlan07 12-28-2012 09:02 PM

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I definitely would hire it out for a big job. But so far this small repair went well you can't tell where the taped seam is. Or the fact the new stuff wasn't flush

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Gary in WA 12-28-2012 09:47 PM

Looks good, nice!

A few professionals here do recommend "hire it out" though we are a DIY site...

Gary

stoner529 12-29-2012 07:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GBR in WA (Post 1081609)
Looks good, nice!

A few professionals here do recommend "hire it out" though we are a DIY site...

Gary

Can you agree Gary that although we are a DIY site, a recommendation to hire out sometimes is the best option for DIY. Ive noticed in that picture that it looks like there may be a slight bend in the drywall to the corner bead. The corner bead also looks bent which can make it hard to reattach to anything and may cause it to pop off. Since it looks like it is a drop ceiling for a bathroom, i would imagine it may get a tile ceiling but i could be wrong. Lets hope the twisted bead wont make things to hard to repair. Sometimes pictures hide tape lines, but in person they may be able to be picked out to someone that didnt do the work.

harlan07 12-29-2012 10:08 PM

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Yes the corner bead is bent there. I'm going to be covering the whole edge with some tiles that wrap around but I'll need to straighten that place out.

I finished the other wall today.

One place the tape is blistering back up so I cut it out. Hoping I can just cover it with mud. There isn't a seam there, it was just a place I overshot with too much tape.

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If I had to do any large amount of this I'd definitely hire it out because its taking me a really long time to make this look right.

I'm a perfectionist so I kept sanding and putting more mud until it was perfectly smooth.

stoner529 12-29-2012 10:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by harlan07 (Post 1082227)
Yes the corner bead is bent there. I'm going to be covering the whole edge with some tiles that wrap around but I'll need to straighten that place out.

I finished the other wall today.

One place the tape is blistering back up so I cut it out. Hoping I can just cover it with mud. There isn't a seam there, it was just a place I overshot with too much tape.

Attachment 62716

If I had to do any large amount of this I'd definitely hire it out because its taking me a really long time to make this look right.

I'm a perfectionist so I kept sanding and putting more mud until it was perfectly smooth.


all the more reason to hire out for it, however, no offense, you would be the type of homeowner i would not want to work for. You seem like you would pick the heck out of stuff, but i dont personally know you or have ever met you to really assume that. i have worked for homeowners like that. they dont realize a remodel is still a remodel and may not ever look like new.

harlan07 12-30-2012 11:28 AM

Well I don't expect it to look brand new but I atleast wanted it to look as close to professional as i could get. Didn't want any tape bulging out or grooves from the tape knife.

If I wanted to hire it out I wouldn't have come in here asking for help. I like to atleast try stuff and learn.

Like I said I have learned I would hire out a big job but this small repair wasn't rocket science and I enjoyed learning how to do it, it took me longer to do it than a pro, but who cares? I enjoyed it and now I know how to so small repairs. I don't see a reason to hire out a small job like this.


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