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Old 08-28-2009, 07:21 PM   #16
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Is it possible to do an entire home interior in cement board & avoid flimsy drywall?


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Isn't one of the selling features for concrete homes greater energy efficiency? Acts like a big heat sink.

As for PT in roof framing, I can't see how they'd change more or less than ordinary lumber. Better yet, what about steel or laminate?

In short, there has to be a better way than weak wood & paper covered drywall which storms find amazingly easy to blow away & bugs love to eat. There has to be a better way......
what you described...
"studded out with either pressure treated or ripped down laminate and covered in 1/2" concrete board in place of drywall"...
is not a concrete house.
Just build your exterior walls from cinder block, fill them solid and build the interior the regular way.

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Old 08-28-2009, 08:22 PM   #17
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Is it possible to do an entire home interior in cement board & avoid flimsy drywall?


how about interior plaster?
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Old 08-28-2009, 08:44 PM   #18
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Is it possible to do an entire home interior in cement board & avoid flimsy drywall?


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what you described...
"studded out with either pressure treated or ripped down laminate and covered in 1/2" concrete board in place of drywall"...
is not a concrete house.
Just build your exterior walls from cinder block, fill them solid and build the interior the regular way.
Build the walls as you describe, but use moisture/rot/insect/mold resistant materials in the inside, too. Still stuck on the walls. I don't like anything that I can too easily damage or that crumbles the second it sees water as sheetrock does.

The roof is harder. I was thinking of a flat steel plate of sorts bolted to the upper level of the wall. To that plate one could have pre welded sets of brackets that roof rafters would slip into & be bolted in. Sort of like this side view: ___ll____ll____ll_____ll_____ . The idea is to have the roof strong enough so that even a twister couldn't budge it? The roof decking? Hmm.... maybe 2x6 PT covered with waterproof membrane and then synthetic slate or metal, if it doesn't look too cheap.

I'm just at the musing stage now. Just thinking a few ideas through & wondered if others had better ideas than I.
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Old 08-29-2009, 11:36 AM   #19
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Is it possible to do an entire home interior in cement board & avoid flimsy drywall?


you could go with steel framing 12" o.c. ( overkill), spray foam insulation and 5/8" rock. 5/8" rock is solid and I always recommend it. Makes for a much better job IMO.
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Old 08-29-2009, 11:42 AM   #20
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Is it possible to do an entire home interior in cement board & avoid flimsy drywall?


To the extent that you are concernd about the durability of interior panalized finish materials, take a look here http://www.usg.com/resources/architect/pdf/01JuneAbuseResistantWalls.pdf .
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Old 08-29-2009, 11:44 AM   #21
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Is it possible to do an entire home interior in cement board & avoid flimsy drywall?


i think you could buy an old nike missle silo and be very comfortable there
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Old 08-29-2009, 12:45 PM   #22
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Is it possible to do an entire home interior in cement board & avoid flimsy drywall?


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To the extent that you are concernd about the durability of interior panalized finish materials, take a look here http://www.usg.com/resources/architect/pdf/01JuneAbuseResistantWalls.pdf .
Sounds great. It has long puzzled me that we use what is essentially paper covered talcum powder that crumbles under the slightest blow or wetness for our homes. Seems so...... primitive.
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Old 08-29-2009, 08:12 PM   #23
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Is it possible to do an entire home interior in cement board & avoid flimsy drywall?


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....Seems so...... primitive.
So does sex, but it works


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Old 09-02-2009, 11:45 AM   #24
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Is it possible to do an entire home interior in cement board & avoid flimsy drywall?


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So does sex, but it works
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Hey Man, dream away and do whatever you want, I like creative.

In my opinion though, I'm not going to be here in 200 years so I really don't give a ____ if my house is. I like to build, move things, add walls, etc... so drywall is a great product for me. And the rock/cement buildings I have been in have all been stinky, ugly, and usually damp.

Fact is, water shouldn't be making contact with drywall, if it is... there's a problem, and that needs to be fixed!

Same thing goes for any products in the house. If you build a water 'resistant' house, then are you going to use carpet? And if not, then are you going to use waterproof furniture? What about water proof electrical?

The reality is, after you do all this environment proofing, what are you going to do..... spray it all down with water and be amazed how it doesn't wreck anything?

I think the missile silo idea is the best option for ya dude!
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Old 09-06-2009, 05:05 PM   #25
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Is it possible to do an entire home interior in cement board & avoid flimsy drywall?


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Well,if you like extreme,find a cave somewhere and drill out a couple of holes for ventilation and light.


On a serious note though:

You really should consider conventional framing for the purpose of resale value alone.Most extreme construction is a hard sell and if you get in a position where you have to move,you may get stuck with not being able to recoup your investment.
I'm not saying that it's a bad idea to think outside the box,but in the real world,economics is a major consideration.
Incorporating some of your ideas into construction is a valid approach,but the test of time should be a determining factor in any mods you decide to make.
I like your way of thinking,as new ideas help evolve the industry.Keep doing the research,but watch for fads and gimmicks that compliment your ideals,but haven't been tested in the field.


Thinking outside the box is very good, if it is done the right way.

Since i live in the US I was not able to find a big vari of building material.
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Old 09-12-2009, 08:08 PM   #26
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Is it possible to do an entire home interior in cement board & avoid flimsy drywall?


18" thick foundation: 3" for brick ledge, 8" for block walls (filled w/ concrete & rebar) plus a 7" "shelf" to support the inner structure. All wood framing would be PT or glulam PT and where ever possible ripped to the exact same width, i.e no more wavy walls. Of course, all PT would have to be allowed to dry & then ripped to an exact width. Of course, we'd need to use setting compound.

The roof rafters and ceiling joists would be bolted inside a steel sill plate, with spaces every 16" OC for them. The steel still would itself be bolted to the top of the filled block wall. Would look sorta kinda like this from a side view:

____ll_____ll______ll______ll______

Roof sheathing would be tongue & grove 2x6 PT covered with ice/water shield & the heaviest duty non industrial roofing I could find. Windows would be hurricane/impact resistant. Floors might be ipe or some other very hard wood.


If I won the lottery, maybe I'd have a commercial steel inside frame & a concrete floor/ceiling.

All interior walls would be first covered perhaps in 1/2" plywood & then 1/2" mold/moisture resistant "heavy duty" sheetrock or the like. All electircal boxes would be metal and all wire BX. No flimsy plastic. Nothing weak, wimpy or easily damaged.

Well, thats my dream. Doubt it'll ever happen, but perhaps when I build my next house I'll incorpora
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Old 09-13-2009, 01:44 AM   #27
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Is it possible to do an entire home interior in cement board & avoid flimsy drywall?


FYI, ripping graded dimension lumber (or LVL, PSL, Timberstrand, etc) negates the grade, thereby creating something that cannot be utilized in span or bearing elements of the home.
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Old 09-13-2009, 07:45 AM   #28
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Is it possible to do an entire home interior in cement board & avoid flimsy drywall?


Saying gyproc is 'talcum powder between paper' is like saying concrete is just sand and rock.

You might as well go full hog and say talcum powder is baby powder, which it is. So say gyproc is 'baby powder and paper'.

Actually, gyproc is made of gypsum, not talc.
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Old 09-13-2009, 09:03 AM   #29
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Is it possible to do an entire home interior in cement board & avoid flimsy drywall?


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FYI, ripping graded dimension lumber (or LVL, PSL, Timberstrand, etc) negates the grade, thereby creating something that cannot be utilized in span or bearing elements of the home.
Did not know this, but wouldn't have to rip it. LVL is uniform, unlike the crappy wood available today.
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Old 09-13-2009, 09:05 AM   #30
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Is it possible to do an entire home interior in cement board & avoid flimsy drywall?


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Saying gyproc is 'talcum powder between paper' is like saying concrete is just sand and rock.

You might as well go full hog and say talcum powder is baby powder, which it is. So say gyproc is 'baby powder and paper'.

Actually, gyproc is made of gypsum, not talc.
Too easily damaged, too frail & too susceptible to moisture. Paper backed crumbly dust....how weak can we get? At least the sand, rock & cement in concrete becomes something more stable & strong.

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