DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Drywall & Plaster (http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/)
-   -   Placing drywall ceiling butt joints off joist. (http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/placing-drywall-ceiling-butt-joints-off-joist-160604/)

ppeetteerr 10-19-2012 11:58 PM

Placing drywall ceiling butt joints off joist.
 
1 Attachment(s)
I was wondering if anyone has any experience with not ending the drywall. I am used to hanging drywall such that the but joint ends on the ceiling joist --similar to the but joint of the wall ending on the stud. However, recently I have found several sources demonstrating ending the joint off of the joist. The two sheets are then secured using a piece of plywood and two 1/8" shims to create a tapered joint. Your thoughts?

Sources

http://joneakes.com/jons-fixit-datab...hout-any-bumps

http://www.finehomebuilding.com/PDF/Free/021174058.pdf

ToolSeeker 10-20-2012 08:21 AM

I have the ones from trimtex called butt boards and they are fantastic.

oh'mike 10-20-2012 08:59 AM

It's a tried and true method----Willie T promotes the use----I say--try it and let us know how you like that method--

joecaption 10-20-2012 09:24 AM

Why in the picture are they showing shims on the ends of the piece of plywood not just a simple piece of plywood laying flat on the boards?
Seems like that would be a sure way to not have the sheets line up at the joint, and allow the sheets to flex.
Cutting the first sheet so it lines up with a joist, or starting from the other direction will often times keep the sheets lined up with the joist instead of having to use the blocking.

Fix'n it 10-20-2012 09:28 AM

i am using it, and i think it is fantastic ! i made my own butt boards = 1/2" osb, about 12" wide and 4' long. i found some thick paper (free is always good. it was at walmart, in between layers of paper towels on the pallet). i then cut 2" strips and calked it to the wide sides of the boards, let dry. this comes out to less that 1/8" , i would not go larger that this, as it will cause drywall problems . i installed all of the ceiling drywall first. i then layed the boards out in a the attic. from below, i drilled a hole for the first screw and put screw in.. after that no other drilling is needed. i put screws every 3-4".

Fix'n it 10-20-2012 09:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1034441)
Why in the picture are they showing shims on the ends of the piece of plywood not just a simple piece of plywood laying flat on the boards?
Seems like that would be a sure way to not have the sheets line up at the joint, and allow the sheets to flex.
Cutting the first sheet so it lines up with a joist, or starting from the other direction will often times keep the sheets lined up with the joist instead of having to use the blocking.

joe. the idea is to make the drywall flex up a little. creating a low spot for the tape to set down into, just like on the long sides of the drywall.

joecaption 10-20-2012 09:44 AM

Got ya.

Fix'n it 10-20-2012 09:54 AM

look at the pic in the first link. at first i used shims about that thick. when i put the screws in, they pulled through the drywall and cracked it up quit a bit, it was a mess. not only that, a valley that deep would use a lot of mud to fill.

drywallfinisher 10-20-2012 07:51 PM

Why would you do this other than to have no waste. The plyboard shim system has no integrity. The seem could crack easily and if your ceiling joints crack with a textured surface...you then have a mess to deal with.
Tride and true is conventionalism....there's a reason we hang to joist and not play chance to a system that has flaws....I dont like this :(

ToolSeeker 10-20-2012 08:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by drywallfinisher (Post 1034705)
Why would you do this other than to have no waste. The plyboard shim system has no integrity. The seem could crack easily and if your ceiling joints crack with a textured surface...you then have a mess to deal with.
Tride and true is conventionalism....there's a reason we hang to joist and not play chance to a system that has flaws....I dont like this :(

Because you haven't tried it. Why have a butt to mess with when you don't have to. It tapes and muds just like a factory seam. Just for fun go to drywall talk.com and ask for an opinion. I think you will be surprised.

drywallfinisher 10-20-2012 09:31 PM

I guarantee my work with 23 years of experience. I will never use this system.
https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphot..._3482104_n.jpg

Gary in WA 10-21-2012 12:05 AM

If it is getting inspected, it may not meet minimum safety code: http://publicecodes.cyberregs.com/ic...002_par010.htm "shall occur on the framing members"

The drywall board manufacturers mention wood framing members OR other "solid backing", you could use them but may need to support them securely to the framing to pass minimum code. (Not just to each other and floating board).pp.3,4; 4.1-4.8, pp.8, 5.2, 5.4 and on furring; 8.2; http://publicecodes.cyberregs.com/ic...002_par010.htm

So far as I know, butt boards haven't been approved (in case of fire) -which is why we use drywall, check with local AHJ.

Gary

mae-ling 10-21-2012 02:44 AM

Butt boards give a recess for the mud to go in, you don't have to deal with crooked, uneven, wane, angled, or twisted studs/rafters/etc.

1/8" thick on the sides is a little much, causes screws to rip the paper. A heavy 1/16 is nice.

ToolSeeker 10-21-2012 08:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by drywallfinisher (Post 1034760)
I guarantee my work with 23 years of experience. I will never use this system.
https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphot..._3482104_n.jpg

Wow you remind me of the guys that used to say they would never change to latex paint, or would never change from plaster to drywall, and this may surprise you but I also guarantee my work. And in the 7 or 8 years I have been using butt boards I have never had a callback because of one. And most of us don't have a $1200 bazooka laying around. To do butts with a knife and pan and get it right is a royal PIA. Even the guys on drywall talk.com that use the zooms and mud boxes swear by these just for ease of use and time saved. I know I'm not going to change your mind but just for fun do a little research.
GBR these are considered wood backing, I guess, as they are approved and they have nothing to do with fire you still use drywall these go behind it and is taped and mudded the same as any other joint.

drywallfinisher 10-21-2012 12:27 PM

Personally I think this thread is spam.
Trolls looking to generate traffic to their websites to pitch a sale.
I came to this site 16 months ago because I was putting an addition onto my home and needed some advice on sure-ing up a load baring wall. I see post like this with questionable content and I get prompted to go to another web address? I got everything I need as far as knowledge of my profession and being a professional I offer up solutions willing. Here..not somewhere else.
I'd advocate a reliable source of info between diy-ers and professionals on this site and put questionable content to the front pages for the professionals to offer up their opinions. At this point it is obvious this system is questionable.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:52 PM.