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-   -   painting new drywall in bathroom (http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/painting-new-drywall-bathroom-50939/)

LittleBrownDog 08-15-2009 09:31 AM

painting new drywall in bathroom
 
I just had new drywall installed in the bathroom-walls only, ceiling is still old.

1. I have heard good things about Zinsser 123 primer. Can that be used directly on the drywall or do I need to use Zinsser's drywall primer first? Basically, I'm asking if I need to use two coats of primer.

2. Also, what's the best way to handle the ceiling. It's probably got at least two coats of paint on it already and all around the edge has drywall tape/joint compound from when the drywall went up. What type of primer and paint would work best there?

3. The drywall that was put up is mold/mildew resistant? Does the primer need to be? The paint as well?

4. This is our only shower. How can we cut down on moisture while the paint is drying?

Thanks!

KLR 08-15-2009 11:08 AM

If the drywall has been properly sanded smooth...One coat is all you need of the Zinsser 123 primer or Kilz (oil based for bathroom areas). Yes, it goes directly over the drywall and over the corner tape/joint compound, etc, use a roller to get maximum amount of primer/paint on the walls and ceiling. Be sure to use an oil based paint also. Always cut in the corners with a brush first, before using the roller. You don't need to sand in between primer and paint. The higher the gloss the longer it will last (high gloss resists moisture better).

To cut down on moister you can:
leave the overhead fan on all the time;
run the air conditioner more;
leave the bathroom window open;
run a portable fan in the bathroom.

TheDIYerGuy 08-15-2009 12:58 PM

Although an Oil based primer, like Zinsser's cover stain, is good in a bathroom, there are other paints available that will work well as topcoats but are latex, easier to clean up and lower VOC's. Because the Zinsser primer is considered a universal undercoat, your latex will stick just fine to this, just make sure you get a mold or mildew resistant finish like a satin or semi-gloss

KLR 08-15-2009 01:33 PM

Our bathroom was painted with a "good latex". I protested but the painter said he would come back and redo it for free if it failed....well it failed after less than a year, streaks are running from the top of the walls down. It looks aweful. The painter can't be found. I will never use anything but oil based in a bathroom area. Just my 2 cents.

Forgot to mention, if you want a more textured look, you will have to spray the walls with texture. They sell it in cans at Lowes or Home Smepo. This is also good to cover small imperfections on the walls/ceiling

chrisn 08-16-2009 05:44 AM

http://www.zinsser.com/product_detail.asp?ProductId=35

LeviDIY 08-17-2009 02:31 PM

HD sells this mildecide additive they can stir into your paints for an extra $2... not sure if it even does anything, but helps me sleep a little better :)

chrisn 08-17-2009 05:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LeviDIY (Post 315667)
HD sells this mildecide additive they can stir into your paints for an extra $2... not sure if it even does anything, but helps me sleep a little better :)


As long as you are not stirring it into Behr, you should sleep fine, it does work.

mazzonetv 08-18-2009 01:35 PM

the fact that you mentioned this was your only bathroom and you are concerned about moisture would have me definitely suggest your stay away from oils. They take a long time to dry and if moisture gets in the finish it looks awful and is prone to failure. My personal preference is the Aura Bath and Spa from Ben Moore. One hour recoat, dries fast, self priming, and extremely durable. Hasn't been out all that long but their products certainly have a good rep. Oil is definitely the "old school" way of thinking - no offense old guys :no: but technology has progressed enough that it is so rarely used for interior walls anymore and is really not necessary. If you wanted to do an oil based primer and top coat with a good latex, you certainly could but just be aware of the humidity in the room. Do you have an exhaust fan?

chrisn 08-18-2009 06:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mazzonetv (Post 316115)
the fact that you mentioned this was your only bathroom and you are concerned about moisture would have me definitely suggest your stay away from oils. They take a long time to dry and if moisture gets in the finish it looks awful and is prone to failure. My personal preference is the Aura Bath and Spa from Ben Moore. One hour recoat, dries fast, self priming, and extremely durable. Hasn't been out all that long but their products certainly have a good rep. Oil is definitely the "old school" way of thinking - no offense old guys :no: but technology has progressed enough that it is so rarely used for interior walls anymore and is really not necessary. If you wanted to do an oil based primer and top coat with a good latex, you certainly could but just be aware of the humidity in the room. Do you have an exhaust fan?


Watch out who you are calling old:wink:


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